What You Need to Know About Stocks

Stocks are a common choice for many investors.  There are two types of stocks – preferred and common.  Because most investors buy common stocks, they will be the subject of this post.  I’ll talk about what you need to know about stocks before you buy them, including:

  • Stocks and how they work.
  • The price you will pay.
  • The risks of owning stocks.
  • Approaches people use for selecting stocks.
  • How stock are taxed.
  • When you might consider buying stocks.
  • How to buy a stock.

What are Stocks?

Stocks are ownership interests in companies.  They are sometimes called equities or shares.  When you buy a stock, you receive a certificate that indicates the number of shares you own.  If you buy your investments through a brokerage firm, it will hold your certificates for you.  If you buy them directly, you will usually receive the certificate (and will want to maintain it in an extremely safe place as it is your only proof that you own the stock).  Some companies track their stock’s owners electronically, so you may not always get a physical certificate.

How Do Stocks Work?

Companies sell stock as a way to raise money.  The company receives the amount paid for the shares of stock when they are issued, minus a fee paid to the investment banker that assists with the sale.  The process of issuing stock is called a public offering.  The first time a company offers its shares to the public, it is called an initial public offering (IPO).

Stockholder-Company Interactions

After the stock has been sold by the company, the stockholder has the following interactions with the company:

  • It receives any dividends paid by the company.
  • It gets to vote on matters brought before shareholders at least annually.  These issues include election of directors, advisory input on executive compensation, selection of auditors and other matters.
  • It has the option to sell the stock back to the company if the company decides to repurchase some of its stock.

In addition to these benefits of owning stock, you also can sell it at the then-current market price at any time.

Why Companies Care About Their Stock Prices

Interestingly, after the stock has been sold by the company, future sales of the stock do not impact the finances of the company other than its impact on executive compensation.  That is, if you buy stock in a company other than when it is issued, you pay for the stock and the proceeds go to the seller (who isn’t the company)!

You might wonder, then, why a company might care about its stock price.  That’s where executive compensation comes in!  Many directors and senior executives at publicly traded companies have a portion of their compensation either paid in stock or determined based on the price of the company’s stock.  When the leadership owns a lot of stock or is paid based on the stock price, it has a strong incentive to act in a way that will increase the price of the stock.  As such, with appropriate incentive compensation for directors and executives, their interests are more closely aligned with yours (i.e., you both want the price of the company’s stock to go up).

What Price Will I Pay?

The price you will pay for a stock is the amount that the person selling the stock is willing to take in payment.  Finance theory asserts that the price of a stock should be the present value of the cash flows you will receive as the owner of a stock.

In my post on bonds, I explain present values.  They apply fairly easily to the price of a bond, as the cash flows to the owner of a bond are fairly clear – the coupons or interest payments and the return of the principal on a known date.

By comparison, the cash flows to the owner of a stock are much more uncertain.  There are two types of cash flows to the owner of a stock – dividends and the money you receive when you sell the stock.

Dividends

Dividends are amounts paid by the company to stockholders.  Many companies pay dividends every quarter or every year.  In most cases, the amount of these dividends stay fairly constant or increase a little bit every year.  The company, though, is under no obligation to pay dividends and can decide at any time to stop paying them.  As such, while many people assume that dividends will continue to be paid, there is more uncertainty in whether they will be paid than there is with bond interest.

Proceeds from the Sale of the Stock

The owner of the stock will receive an amount equal to the number of shares sold times the price per share at the time of sale.  This cash flow has two components of uncertainty to it.

  1. You don’t know when you will sell it. You therefore don’t know for how long you need to discount this cash flow to calculate the present value.
  2. It is impossible to predict the price of a stock in the future.

What are the Risks?

The biggest risk of buying a stock is that its value could decrease.   At the extreme, a company could go bankrupt.  In a bankruptcy, creditors (e.g., employees and vendors) are paid first.  If there is money left after creditors have been paid, then the remaining funds are used to re-pay a portion of any bond principal.  By definition, there isn’t enough money to pay all of the creditors and bondholders when there is a bankruptcy.  As such, the bondholders will not get all of their principal re-paid and there will be no money left after payment has been made to bondholders and creditors.  When there is no money left in the company, the stock becomes worthless.

Any of the following factors (and others) can cause the price of the stock to go down.

Economic Conditions Change

Changes in economic conditions can cause the interest rate used for discounting in the present value calculation to increase. When the interest rate increases, present values (estimates of the price) will go down.

Company Changes

Something changes at the company that causes other investors to believe that the company’s profits will be less than previously expected. One simple way that some investors estimate the price of a company’s stock is to multiply the company’s earnings by a factor, called the price-to-earnings ratio or P/E ratio.  Although P/E ratios aren’t constant over time, the price of a stock goes down when its earnings either decrease or are forecast to be lower than expected in the future.

Increased Risk

Changes either in the economy or at the company can cause investors to think that the future profits of the company are more uncertain, i.e., riskier. When a cash flow is perceived to be riskier, a higher interest rate is used in the present value calculation.  This concept is illustrated in my post on bonds in the graph that shows how interest rates on bonds increase as the credit rating of the company goes down.  Recall that lower credit ratings correspond to higher risk.  The same concept applies to stock prices.  The prices of riskier stocks are less than the prices of less risky stocks if all other things are equal.

How Do People Decide What to Buy?

There are a number of approaches investors use to decide in which companies to buy stocks and when to buy and sell them.   I will discuss several of them in future posts.

Reasonable Price Investing

Reasonable price investors look at the financial fundaments and stock prices of companies to decide whether and when to buy and sell them.

Technical Analysis

Technical analysts, sometimes called momentum investors, look at patterns in the movement of the prices of companies’ stocks.  Day traders tend to be technical analysts whose time horizon for owning a stock can be hours or days.

High-Yield Investing

Some investors focus on companies whose stock pays high dividends relative to the price of the stock.

Mutual Funds and Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs)

Rather than invest in individual companies, some investors purchase either mutual or exchange-traded funds.  Under this approach, the investor relies on the fund managers to select the companies and determine when to buy and sell each position.

How are Stocks Taxed?

There are two ways in which stocks can impact your income taxes:

  • When you receive a dividend.
  • When you sell your ownership interest in the stock.

The total amount of the dividend is subject to tax.  The difference between the proceeds of selling the stock and the amount you paid for the stock is called a realized capital gain or loss.  It is gain if the sale proceeds is more than the purchase amount and a loss if the sale proceeds are less than the purchase amount.

In the US, realized capital gains and losses on stocks you have owned for more than a year are added to dividends.  For most people, the sum of these two amounts is taxed at 15%.  For stocks owned for less than a year, the realized capital gains are taxed at your ordinary tax rate (i.e., the rate you pay on your wages).

In Canada, dividends and half of your realized capital gains are added to your wages.  The total of those amounts is subject to your ordinary income tax rate.

When Should I Buy Stocks?

Understand Stocks

The most important consideration in determining when to buy stocks is that you understand how stocks work.  One of the messages I wished I had given our children is to invest only in things you understand.  If you don’t understand stocks, you don’t want to invest in them.

Understand the Companies or Funds

You also want to make sure you understand the particular company or fund you are purchasing.  One of the biggest investing mistakes I made was when I was quite young and didn’t understand the business of the company whose stock I owned.

My parents gave me some shares of a company called Wang Laboratories.  In the 1970s and early 1980s, Wang was one of the leaders in the market for dedicated word processors.  Picture a desktop computer with a monitor that’s only software was Microsoft Word, only much harder to use.  That was Wang’s biggest product.  At one time, the stock price was $42.  Not understanding that PCs were entering the market and would be able to do so much more than a dedicated word processor, I was oblivious.  As the stock started going down, I sold a few shares in the high $30s.  When the stock dropped to $18, I told myself I would sell the rest when it got back to $21.  It never did.  A year or so later, the stock was completely worthless. Fortunately, I was young enough that I had a lot of time to recover and learn from this mistake.

Be Willing and Able to Understand the Risks

You should also not buy stocks if you can’t afford to lose some or all of your principal.  Even though only a few companies go bankrupt, such as Wang, the price of individual stocks can be quite volatile.  As discussed in my post on diversification, you can reduce the chances that your portfolio will have a decline in value by either owning a large number of stocks or owning them for a long time.  Nonetheless, you might find that the value of your portfolio is less than the amount you invested especially over short periods of time when you invest in stocks.  If you want to invest in stocks, you need to be willing to tolerate those ups and downs in value both mentally and financially.

Market Timing

There is an old investing adage, “Buy low, sell high.”  In principle, it is a great strategy.  In practice, though, it is hard to identify the peaks and valleys in either the market as a whole or an individual stock.

People who invest over very short time frames – hours or days – often use technical analysis to try to identify very short-term highs and lows to create gains.  I anticipate that most of my followers, though, will be investing for the long term and not day trading.  While you will want to select stocks that are expected to produce a return commensurate with their riskiness, it is very difficult to time the market.

That is, my suggestion for new investors with long-term investment horizons (e.g., for retirement or your young children’s college expenses) is to buy stocks or mutual funds you understand and think are likely to appreciate whenever you have the time and money available to do so.  If you happen to buy a fundamentally sound stock or index fund just before its price drops, it will be difficult to hang on but it is likely to increase in the price by the time you need to sell it.

As Chris @MoneyStir learned when he reviewed the post I wrote about whether he should pre-pay his mortgage, a fall in the stock market right after he started using his extra cash to buy stocks on a monthly basis was actually good for him!  While he lost money at first on his first few month’s investments, the ones he made over the next several months were at a lower stock price and produced a higher-than-average return over his investment horizon.  The process of buying stocks periodically, such as every month, is called dollar-cost averaging.

How and Where Do I Buy Stocks?

You can buy stocks, mutual funds and ETFs at any brokerage firm.  This article by Invested Wallet provides details on how to open an account at a brokerage firm.

Once you have an account, you need to know the name of the company or its symbol (usually 2-5 letters that can be found using Google or Yahoo Finance, for example), how many shares you want to buy and whether you want to set the price at which you purchase the stocks or buy them at the market price.

Limit Orders

If you determine you want to buy a stock at a particular price, it is called a limit order.  The advantage of a limit order is you know exactly how much you will pay.  The disadvantages of a limit order are:

  • You might pay more than you have to if the stock price is lower at the time you place your order.
  • You might not buy the stock if no one is interested in selling the stock at a price that is a low as your desired purchase price.

Market Orders

If you place a market order, you will buy the stock at whatever price sellers are willing to take for their stock at the moment you place your order.  In some cases, you may end up paying more than you want for a stock if the price jumps up right at the time you place your order.  The advantages of a market order are (1) you know you will own the stock and (2) you know you are getting the best price available at the time you buy the stock.

Transaction Fees

Many of the major brokerage firms have recently announced that they will no longer charge you each time you purchase or sell a stock.  Some firms charge you small transaction fees, such as $4.95, each time you place a buy or sell order.  Other firms have higher charges.  You’ll want to consider the fees when you select a brokerage firm.

Recovery from Financial Disaster

Ever wonder how you’d handle a complete reversal of your finances? I have a friend who had a lifestyle most people would envy and lost everything, including her marriage. I didn’t meet her until after her recovery from her financial disaster. She is one of the most resilient, generous people I know and was kind enough to let me interview her about the changes in her life, the financial lessons she learned and her advice to you on how to avoid finding yourself in a similar situation.

The High Life

“My life was very plentiful with many material objects.

  • 6,000+ square foot custom designed home – 6 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms and two full kitchens
  • Photography and recording studios
  • In ground swimming pool
  • Custom designed furniture
  • Six cars
  • Trips
  • Private education for both kids
  • Entertainment

I never priced groceries, just grab and dash.  We belonged to a private country club as well.  We also had an investment property that we rented to a family member.”

Tell Me about Your Finances

“I did not think of my financial future.  I was in my mid to late 40s and I thought the gravy train would never stop.  We had many investments, 401(k) and IRA retirement accounts for us as well as the children.  My husband was a very successful stock broker, financial planner and money management specialist. We had a dual income, and mine paid for the cream on the top.”

What Happened?

“The stock market along with the real estate market became very soft in 2007.  When I began to notice that these change were imminent, I suggested that we liquidate assets into a strong cash position.  My husband dismissed my thoughts on this topic because I had never been persistent in being a co-manager of our funds.  The economy was showing its ugly powerful head and so was our 40-year marriage.

Things went from bad to worse.  We lost our home. Instead of getting money from the buyer when we sold our house, we had to come to closing with a six-figure check to pay off the mortgage balance (because we owed more than we got for the house). Otherwise, we would have had to negotiate a short sale with the holders of the loan on the house to try to get them to accept only the amount for which we sold it, but chose to close in a traditional manner due to a prideful attitude that made no sense at all.

We divorced.  The money, the investments and the lifestyle were gone.  I was 59 years old. Our children were grown and gone.  Thank God they had their educations!”

What Did You Do?

“I moved into a house with five other people to secure a reasonable rent of $600 a month.  I rolled up my sleeves and decided to re-invent myself as a strong salesperson with a steady stream of income.  As part of creating a fiscally responsible lifestyle, I consolidated my debt and made a conscious effort to understand my taxes and my expenses.  These changes allowed me to pay off the tax liability for which I was half responsible after the divorce.”

What is Your Life like Now?

“My lifestyle now is very simple.

  • I use one credit card.
  • If I can’t afford something, I don’t buy it.
  • I shop at thrift stores, make curtains, paint, have learned some electrical skills and can do just about anything.

Having made the financial changes, I now have the opportunity to travel. I have investments and simple monthly debt. My credit score is very high and I am able to contribute to my savings account and an IRA on a regular basis.”

What Advice Do You Have?

“I learned these financial lessons that might help your readers:

  • Always know your cash position whether or not you are wealthy.
  • Have a good grasp on your finances.  Knowledge is power.
  • Cash is king.
  • Know your financial position at all times.
  • Stay away from credit cards and their incredible interest rates.
  • Save and keep adding to your retirement.”

Closing Thoughts from Susie Q

You’ll notice that my friend’s financial lessons learned are similar to themes you’ve seen in posts I’ve written, especially in the post on advice we gave our kids.

Her story, though, provides real-life insights into why these actions are so important.

You’d never know if you met my friend now that she had to make such a long recovery from financial disaster. She is always upbeat, willing to lend a hand and a great motivator. In fact, she contributed to the initial costs of this blog because she was so thrilled that I am willing to share my knowledge with others to help them be financially literate. I hope I am as resilient as she is if I ever face an equally daunting challenge.

Top Ten Posts in Our First Year

Financial IQ by Susie Q celebrated its first birthday last week. In the first year, we published 52 posts on our site, two of which were guest posts from other authors, and published two posts on other blogs. In case you haven’t had time to keep up with reading the posts as they are published, we provide you with a list of our ten posts with the highest page views. (We note that there were two periods during which our site wasn’t “talking” to Google Analytics, so there might be a few posts that should have made the top ten, but didn’t.)

#1 Advice We Gave our Kids

This post had almost 1,000 page views in large part because it is the only post we’ve had featured on Money Mix. It provides a list of 7 themes about money that my kids heard frequently as they were growing up or as they were starting to make their own financial decisions. In addition, I added two other pieces of advice I wished I had given them.

#2 Should Chris Pre-Pay His Mortgage

This post was one of my favorite ones to write! Chris @MoneyStir published a post given a lot of detail about his financial situation. He asked others whether their opinion on whether he should pre-pay his mortgage. In my response, I showed Chris that, given his particular circumstances, he would be substantially better off after he fully re-paid his mortgage a large percentage of the time if he invested his extra cash instead of using it to pre-pay his mortgage. One of the broader takeaways from this post is the importance of isolating a single decision and not confusing your thinking by combining separate decisions into one process.

#3 Introduction to Budgeting

Introduction to Budgeting was our very first post. I’m not sure how high on the list it would have been had we published it later, as many of our friends viewed the post just to see what we were doing. I still think budgeting, whether done in great detail or at a high level, is a critical component of financial literacy, so hope that it is valuable to our regular followers and not just our curious friends.

#4 What to Do Once You have Savings

This post is the first in a series of three posts intended to provide a framework and guidance once you have some savings. The series talks about how much to put in emergency savings, how to save for big-ticket items, savings for retirement and deciding whether to pre-pay your student loans. For each type of savings, it provides suggestions for appropriate asset choices.

#5 Getting Started with Budgeting

This post is the first in a series of nine posts on how to create a detailed budget. The process starts with tracking your expenses to see how you are spending your money.  Subsequent posts talk about setting financial goals and figuring out how you want to spend your money.  The series finishes with monitoring your expenses to see how you are doing relative to your budget. This post includes a spreadsheet that allows you to track your expenses.

#6 New vs Used Cars

This post totals up all of the costs of owning a car to help you understand how much better off you might be by buying a used car rather than a new car.  For some cars, it is much less expensive to buy used, whereas for other cars it doesn’t cost much more to buy new especially if you plan to own it for a long time.

#7 Traditional vs Roth Retirement Plans

This post provides lots of information about Traditional and Roth IRAs and 401(k)s. It also explains in what situations a Roth is better than a Traditional plan and vice versa, including some examples. The biggest determinant of that decision is your expectations about your marginal tax rate at the time you save relative to your marginal tax rate at the time you make withdrawals. The post provides lots of information on taxes, too, to help you make that decision.

#8 New Cars: Cash, Lease or Borrow?

This post explains the costs related to buying a new car with cash, leasing a new car and borrowing to pay for a new car. It provides a detailed illustration for three different models.  The best choice among those three options depends on your ability to pay cash, how many miles you plan to drive, and the terms of each individual offer. For some cars and situations, leasing is less expensive than borrowing whereas, for others, borrowing is better. It also provides a spreadsheet that allows you to compare your offers.

#9 Car Insurance

I was surprised that this post made the top 10.  I spent my entire career in the insurance business so probably have forgotten how complicated car insurance is! This post describes all of the important terms and coverages you’ll find in a car insurance policy. It also provides some insights on how to decide what coverages, deductibles and limits to select.

#10 Health Insurance

On the other hand, it didn’t surprise me at all that this post made the top 10. In fact, I would have expected it to rate higher than it did. As with #9, this post explains all of the terms included in health insurance policies. Its companion post explains how to select the health insurance plan that best meets your needs and your budget.  That post includes a spreadsheet that follows along with the calculations. I recently had to select an individual health insurance plan as my COBRA benefits expired.  I used exactly the process described in this post to make my decision!

Umbrella Insurance Reduces Your Risk

Umbrella insurance provides broader coverage and more limits than your auto and homeowners policy for liability claims made against you. In this post, I’ll provide:

  • An explanation of what liability is.
  • A description of what is covered under an umbrella policy.
  • An illustration of how the limits work.
  • Some examples that compare the cost of an umbrella policy to the cost of buying higher limits of liability on your auto and homeowners policies.
  • A few suggestions for deciding whether an umbrella policy might be a good purchase for you.

What is Liability

According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, liability is “the responsibility of a person, business, or organization to pay or give up something of value.” In the context of insurance, it is something for which you are responsible to repair, replace or pay related to a third party (i.e., not you or your immediate family). That is, if you injure someone or damage their property, you are liable for their medical costs and lost wages and the repair or replacement cost of their property.

The most commonly considered forms of personal liability relate to your car and your residence. One component of your automobile policy is liability coverage. That coverage defends you and pays the cost (up to your limit of liability) of any injuries to other people or damage to other people’s property from accidents you cause. Similarly, your homeowners (or renters or condo-owners) policy defends you and pays the cost of any injuries to other people or damage to their property related to owning your home.   For example, if someone trips over an uneven spot in your front walk and gets injured or is injured or killed in fire in your home, the costs will be covered by your Homeowners policy.

What is Covered by an Umbrella

There are two ways in which an umbrella policy provides coverage for you:

  • It provides additional liability limits above those on your Homeowners and Auto policies.
  • It provides protection from other sources of personal liability.

Home and Auto

One of the choices you have when purchasing home and auto policies is the liability limit. Most insurers offer limits as high as $500,000 and some have limits has high as $1 million. There are many types of injuries, such a brain trauma, burns and quadriplegia, which can cost well in excess of $500,000 or even $1 million. One source estimates that the average lifetime medical cost for a 25-year-old paraplegic is $2.5 million; for a quadriplegic, $3.6 million to $5 million depending on the location of the injury. In addition, the person causing the injury could be liable for lost wages.

If you injure someone in a car accident or they are injured in your home, you are liable for the total cost of their injuries. If that total is more than the limit of liability on your policy, you are responsible for the excess. That doesn’t mean everyone will make a claim against you for the excess, but they generally have the legal right to make a claim on and, if successful, take your assets.

To reduce the likelihood that your insurance won’t be enough to cover the costs in these situations, you can purchase an umbrella policy that, in essence, increases the limits on your home and auto policies by the limit on the umbrella policy. For example, if you have a $500,000 liability limit on your auto insurance policy and purchase an umbrella policy with a $2 million limit, your insurer will pay $2.5 million to people you injure in auto accidents you cause. It is much less likely that their costs will exceed $2.5 million than $500,000 or $1 million.

Other Sources of Personal Liability

There are many sources of personal liability other than your home and cars. These include injuries or damages from:

  • pets
  • boats
  • ATVs or other “toys”
  • libel
  • slander
  • volunteer activities
  • participation in sports in which you might injure someone else
  • vacant land you own, especially if you lease it out for activities such as hunting

Generally, these sources of personal liability are covered under an umbrella policy though there are exclusions that you’ll want to check.

For example, there are exclusions that limit the coverage for motorized boats and toys and large boats, such as requiring them to be listed on the declaration page and paying a higher premium, buying an underlying policy to provide insurance for liability related to them or limiting the locations at which they are insured. If you have any of these “toys,” you’ll want to make sure that the umbrella policy you purchase is going to provide the coverage you seek.

Limits of Liability

Personal umbrella policies are generally offered with limits ranging from $1 million to $10 million. I’ve read that most people who purchase umbrella policies select a $1 million limit. Our umbrella policy has a $2 million limit, though I don’t have an analytical reason why we chose $2 million.

How Limits Work

The limits on an umbrella policy apply differently for the two types of coverage, as illustrated in the graphic below for an umbrella policy with a $2 million limit and the required liability limits of $300,000 on homeowners and $500,000 on auto.

Your homeowners and auto policies will pay the first $300,000 and $500,000, respectively, of any covered claim. The $2 million of umbrella limit applies on top of these limits, for a total of $2.3 million of liability coverage for homeowners claims and $2.5 million for auto claims. For all other types of personal liability claims, the umbrella policy starts paying immediately (after any deductible on the umbrella policy) and provides $2 million of total coverage for these claims.

I note that many umbrella policies have a small deductible. For example, ours has a $250 deductible. In the graphic above, there should be a very small layer just below the orange box that represents the deductible. In our case, we will pay the first $250 of every claim before our umbrella policy starts paying.

A Clarification about Insurance

As indicated above, if you cause an injury to someone and don’t have enough liability limit on your insurance policies, they can make a claim against your assets. An important point to understand is that insurance policies don’t “protect” or shelter any of your assets. That is, if you buy an umbrella policy with a $1 million limit, it doesn’t mean that claimants won’t be able to take some or all of that $1 million in assets. Rather, it means that claimants can only take your assets if their claims are larger than the total coverage provided by your insurance (e.g., $1 million for personal liability claims and $1 million plus the liability limit on your auto and homeowners policies for those types of claims).

Cost Comparison

I asked my insurance agent, Billy Wagner, Personal Insurance Sales Executive at PayneWest Insurance in Helena, MT, for some examples of the pricing of umbrella policies. He created three different insurance buyers to use as illustrations.

Buyer 1 Single male 1 car Renter No kids No toys or high-risk activities (e.g., dogs that might attack, bungee jumping, local politics)
Buyer 2 Family 3 cars A primary home, rental property and lake cabin 4 teenage drivers Trampoline, pit bull, fast boat, snowmobiles, etc.
Buyer 3 Empty nesters with solid credit 4 cars 1 house No kids at home Two canoes, volunteer work, medium risk overall

Just Auto and Home

The table below shows rough estimates of what each buyer will pay for the liability portion of their auto coverage and the total cost of their homeowners coverage all with $1 million limits.

Buyer Auto Liability Primary Home Total at $1 million limits
1 $800 $1,450 $2,250
2 4,000 2,500 6,500
3 1,500 3,250 4,750

Add Umbrella

If, instead, each buyer purchased the minimum limits required by the umbrella policy ($500,000 for auto liability and $300,000 for homeowners) and bought an umbrella policy with a $1 million limit, the rough costs would be those shown in the table below.

Buyer Auto Liability ($500,000) Home ($300,000) Umbrella ($1 million) Total
1 $650 $1,300 $325 $2,275
2 3,800 2,250 1,250 7,300
3 1,250 3,000 625 4,875

How Much More for the Umbrella?

The total costs of the two options are shown in the table below.

Buyer

$1 million/ No umbrella

Umbrella Additional Cost
1 $2,250 $2,275 $25
2 6,500 7,300 800
3 4,750 4,875 125

If you are already buying $1 million limits on your auto and home policies and aren’t considered high risk, the additional cost of purchasing umbrella coverage is very small ($25 for Buyer 1 and $125 for Buyer 3). Not surprisingly, if you have high-risk drivers, lots of risky toys and participate in risky activities, the additional cost increases, as is the case for Buyer 2.

If you are buying somewhat lower limits, such as $500,000 on your auto and $300,000 on your home, your total insurance bill will increase by the cost of the umbrella coverage – in these examples ranging from about $325 for the single, low-risk insured to $1,250 for the riskier family for $1 million of coverage.   And, if you are buying low limits (such as $100,000 or less), your premium would increase by the cost of raising the limits on your underlying policies to $500,000 and $300,000 for auto and home, respectively, in addition to the cost of the umbrella itself.

How to Decide Whether to Buy

Umbrella policies aren’t for everyone. Generally, people who are the best candidates for purchasing umbrella policies are those who both:

  • Participate in activities that can lead to personal liability claims (such as those listed above), are high-risk drivers or have high-risk characteristics at their residences
  • Have assets that they want to protect

If there isn’t much risk in your life, either in your cars, residence or activities, you might decide to not buy an umbrella policy because you don’t think you will ever have any claims that would be covered by the policy.  Similarly, if you don’t have any assets someone you injure could take, it might not be worth purchasing an umbrella. However, as shown in the tables above, it might not cost much more to purchase an umbrella policy so it is something to consider as it may not have a large impact on your budget.

Higher Deductibles vs. High Limits

One way to offset the additional cost of increasing your liability limits and/or buying an umbrella is to increase your deductibles. I don’t have any specifics on the premium reduction from increasing your deductibles, but one source cited a difference between a $100 deductible and a $1,000 deductible ofvery roughly $200 per year per car. If you have one car and are low-to-medium risk, you could cover a significant portion of the cost of an umbrella policy if you carry the required auto and home limits or the full cost of the changing from a $1 million policy limit to an umbrella policy.

The Risk-Reward Trade-off

The choice of a higher deductible versus more coverage and a high limit is one of risk and reward. If you increase your deductible, you are increasing the maximum amount you will pay on each claim by a fixed amount – say the $900 difference between a $100 deductible and a $1,000 deductible. Using the $200 premium savings estimate above, the additional $200 saves you up to $900 in repair costs each time you have an accident. Even if you have 5 accidents of more than $1,000 each, the total repair cost savings would be less than $5,000. Using the $5,000 as the repair cost savings, the ratio of the premium savings to the repair cost savings is 4% (=$200/$5,000).

On the other hand, spending $325 on an umbrella policy provides you with an additional $1 million of protection if someone is seriously injured either physically or economically by something you own or your actions. If someone is awarded damages that includes the full $1 million coverage under your umbrella policy, the ratio of premium savings to liability savings is 0.03% ($325/$1 million). Of course, it is much less likely that you will cause a loss that goes through the full $1 million coverage of your umbrella and, if you didn’t have the coverage, the amount of damages for which you are sued might be lower.

The trade-off between the much smaller additional cost of repairs with the higher deductible and the potentially much higher cost of a large liability claim is something to consider, especially if you can afford to pay for the repairs to your car from accidents you cause from your budget or emergency savings.

Annual Retirement Savings Targets

Once you know how much you want to save for retirement, you need a plan for building that savings.  Your annual retirement savings target depends on your total savings target, how many years you have until you want to retire and how much risk you are willing to take in your portfolio.  In this post, I’ll provide information you can use to set targets for how much to contribute to your retirement savings each year.

Key Variables

There are several variables that will impact how much you’ll want to target as contributions to your retirement savings each year.  They are:

  • Your total retirement savings target.
  • How much you already have saved.
  • The number of years you are able to contribute to your retirement savings.
  • How much risk you are willing to take in your portfolio.
  • The impact of taxes on investment returns between now and your retirement. That is, what portion of your retirement savings will be in each of taxable accounts, tax-deferred retirement savings accounts and tax-free retirement savings accounts.  For more information on tax-deferred and tax-free retirement savings accounts, check out this post.  I provide a bit more insight on all three types of accounts in these posts on how to choose which assets to buy in which type of account in each of the US and Canada.

Some of these variables are fairly straightforward.  For example, you can check the balances of any accounts with retirement savings that you already have and you can estimate (within a few years, at least) how many years until you retire.

Other variables are more challenging to estimate.  For example, I dedicated a whole separate post to the topic of setting your retirement savings target.

Your Risk Tolerance

Your risk tolerance is a measure of how much volatility you are willing to take in your investments.  As indicated in my post on risk, the more risk you take the higher your expected return but the wider the possible range of results.  My post on diversification and investing shows that the longer period of time over which you invest, the less volatility has been seen historically in the annualized returns.

Here are a few thoughts that might guide you as you figure out your personal risk tolerance.

  • If you have only a few years until you retire, you might want to invest fairly conservatively. By investing conservatively, you might want to invest in money market or high-yield savings accounts that currently have yields in the 1.75% to 2% range.
  • If you have five to ten years until you retire or are somewhat risk averse (i.e., can’t tolerate the ups and downs of the stock market), you might want to invest primarily in bonds (discussed in this post) or bond mutual funds. Depending on the maturity, US government bonds are currently yielding between 1.5% and 2% and high-quality corporate bonds are currently returning between 2.5% and 4%.
  • If you have a longer time period to retire and/or are able to tolerate the volatility of equities (discussed in this post), you might invest in an S&P 500 index fund or an index fund that is even more risky. These funds have average annual returns of 8% or more.

As can be seen, the more risk you take, the higher the average return.  As you are estimating how much you need to save each year for retirement, you’ll need to select an assumption about your average annual investment return based on these (or other) insights and your personal risk tolerance.

Taxability of Investment Returns

In addition to considering your risk tolerance, you’ll need to adjust your investment returns for any taxes you need to pay between the time you put the money in the account and your retirement date.  For this post, I’ve assumed that your savings amount target includes income taxes, as suggested in my post on that topic.  If it does, you only need to be concerned with taxes until you retire in estimating how much you need to save each year.

In the previous section, you selected an average annual investment return.  The table below provides approximations for adjusting that return for Federal income taxes based on the type of financial instruments you plan to buy and the type of account in which you hold it.

US – Taxable

Canada – Taxable

All Tax-Deferred & Tax-Free Accounts

Money Market

Multiply by 0.75

Multiply by 0.75

No adjustment

Bonds and Bond Mutual Funds

Multiply by 0.75

Multiply by 0.75

No adjustment

Equity Mutual Funds

Multiply by 0.85

Multiply by 0.87

No adjustment

Equities and Index Funds

Multiply by 0.85

Multiply by 0.87

No adjustment

Further Refinements to Tax Adjustments

You’ll need to subtract your state or provincial income tax rate from each multiplier. For example, if you state or provincial income tax rate is 10%, you would subtract 0.10 from each multiplier. For Equities and Index Funds, the 0.85 multiplier in the US-Taxable column would be reduced to 0.75.

The assumptions in this table for equities and index funds in particularly and, to a lesser extent, equity mutual funds, are conservative.  Specifically, if you don’t sell your positions every year and re-invest the proceeds, you will pay taxes less than every year.  By doing so, you reduce the impact of income taxes.  Nonetheless, given all of the risks involved in savings for retirement, I think these approximations are useful even if they cause the estimates of how to save every year to be a bit high.

Also, the tax rates for bonds and bond mutual funds could also be conservative depending on the types of bonds you own.  The adjustment factors shown apply to corporate bonds.  The tax rates on interest on government bonds and some municipal bonds are lower.

Calculation of After-Tax Investment Return

From the table above, it is clear that calculating your after-tax investment return depends on both the types of investments you plan to buy and the type of account in which you plan to hold them.  The table below will help you calculate your overall after-tax investment return.

Investment Type

Account Type

Percent of Portfolio Pre-tax Return Tax Adjustment

Product

Money Market, Bonds or Bond Mutual Funds

Taxable

0.75

Equity Mutual Funds, Equities, Index Funds

Taxable

0.85 if US; 0.87 if Canada

All

Other than Taxable

1.00

Total

There are three assumptions you need to enter into this table that reflect the types of financial instruments you will buy (i.e., reflecting your risk tolerance) and the types of accounts in which you will hold those assets in the Percent of Portfolio column.  These assumptions are the percentages of your retirement savings you will invest in:

  • Money markets, bonds or mutual funds in taxable accounts.
  • Equities, equity mutual funds and index funds in taxable accounts.
  • Tax-deferred or tax-free accounts (IRAs, 401(k)s, RRSPs and TFSAs).

For each of these three groups of assets, you’ll put the average annual return you selected from the Risk Tolerance section above in the Pre-Tax return column.  You also may need to adjust the multipliers as discussed above.

Once you have filled in those six boxes, you will multiply the three numbers in each row together to get a single product in the last column of each row.  Your weighted average after-tax investment return will be the sum of the three values in the last column.

Illustration of Weighted Average Return Calculation

I have created an illustration in the table below.  For this illustration, I have assumed that you will invest 50% of your portfolio in bonds and 50% in equities.  You are able to put 60% of your portfolio in tax-deferred and tax-free accounts.  Although not consistent with my post on tax-efficient investing, you split your bonds and stocks between account types in the same proportion as the total.  As such, you have 20% of your portfolio in taxable accounts invested in each of bonds and equities.  The 60% you put in your tax-deferred and tax-free accounts goes in the All Other row.

Investment Type

Account Type

Percent of Portfolio Pre-tax Return Tax Adjustment

Product

Money Market, Bonds or Bond Mutual Funds

Taxable

20% 3% 0.75

0.5%

Equity Mutual Funds, Equities, Index Funds

Taxable

20% 8% 0.85 if US; 0.87 if Canada

1.4%

All

Other than Taxable

60% 5.5% 1.00

3.3%

Total

5.2%

I’ll use a pre-tax return on bonds of 3% and equities of 8%.  Because the All Other category is 50/50 stocks and bonds, the average pre-tax return for that row is the average of 3% and 8% or 5.5%.

I then calculated the products for each row.  For example, in the first row, I calculated 0.5% = 20% x 3% x 0.75.  The weighted average after-tax investment return is the sum of the three values in the product column or 5.2% = 0.5% + 1.4% + 3.3%.  The 5.2% will be used to help estimate how much we need to save each year to meet our retirement savings target.

Annual Savings Targets

By this point, we have talked about how to estimate:

  • Your total retirement savings target
  • The number of years until you retire
  • An after-tax investment return that is consistent with your risk tolerance and the types of accounts in which you plan to put your savings

With that information, you can now estimate how much you need to save each year if you don’t have any savings yet.  I’ll talk about adjusting the calculation for any savings you already have below.

I assumed that you will increase your savings by 3% every year which would be consistent with saving a constant percentage of your earnings each year if your wages go up by 3% each year.  For example, if you put $1,000 in your retirement savings this year, you will put another $1,030 next year, $1,061 in the following year and so on.  In this way, your annual retirement savings contribution will be closer to a constant percentage of your income.

Annual Savings/Total Target

The graph and table below both show the same information – the percentage of your retirement savings goal that you need to save in your first year of savings based on your number of years until you retire and after-tax annual average investment return.

After-tax Return

Years to Retirement
5 10 15 20 25 30 35

40

2%

17.6% 7.8% 4.6% 3.0% 2.1% 1.6% 1.2% 0.9%

3%

17.3% 7.4% 4.3% 2.8% 1.9% 1.4% 1.0% 0.8%

4%

16.9% 7.1% 4.0% 2.5% 1.7% 1.2% 0.9% 0.6%

5%

16.6% 6.8% 3.7% 2.3% 1.5% 1.0% 0.7%

0.5%

6% 16.3% 6.5% 3.5% 2.1% 1.3% 0.9% 0.6%

0.4%

7% 16.0% 6.2% 3.2% 1.9% 1.2% 0.7% 0.5%

0.3%

8% 15.7% 6.0% 3.0% 1.7% 1.0% 0.6% 0.4%

0.3%

As you can see, the more risk you take, the less you need to save on average.  That is, as you go down each column in the table or towards the back of the graph, the percentage of your target you need to save in the first year gets smaller.  Also, the longer you have until you retire (as you move right in the table and graph), the smaller the savings percentage.  I caution those of you who have only a few years until retirement, though, that you will want to think carefully about your risk tolerance and may want to use the values in the upper rows of the table corresponding to lower risk/lower return investments, as there is a fairly high chance that your savings will be less than your target due to market volatility if you purchase risky assets.

How to Use the Table

First find the percentage in the cell with a row that corresponds to your after-tax investment return and a column that corresponds to your time to retirement.  You multiply this percentage by your total retirement savings target.  The result of that calculation is how much you need to save in your first year of saving.  To find out how much to save in the second year, multiply by 1.03.  Keep multiplying by 1.03 to find out how much to save in each subsequent year.

Earlier in this post, I created an example with a 5.2% after-tax investment return.  5.2% is fairly close to 5%, so we will look at the row in the table corresponding to 5% to continue this example.  I have calculated your first- and second-year savings amounts for several combinations of years to retirement and total retirement savings targets for someone with a 5% after-tax investment return below.

Years to Retirement

Savings % from Table (5% Row) Total Retirement Savings Target First-Year Savings Amount Second-Year Savings Amount

5

16.6% $500,000 $83,000 $85,490

15

3.7% 2,000,000 74,000

76,220

30 1.0% 500,000 5,000

5,150

40 0.5% 1,000,000 5,000

5,150

The first-year savings amounts in this table highlight the benefits of starting to save for retirement “early and often.”   It is a lot easier to save $5,000 a year than $75,000 or $85,000 a year.  By comparing the last two rows, you can see the benefits of the extra 10 years between 30 years of savings and 40 years of savings.  With the same starting contributions, on average, you end up with twice as much if you save consistently for 40 years than if you do so for 30 years.

Adjusting for Savings You Already Have

The calculations above don’t take into account that you might already have started saving for retirement.  If you already have some retirement savings, you can reduce the amount your need to save each year.

The math is a bit complicated if you don’t like exponents, but I’ll provide a table that will make it a bit easier.  To adjust the annual savings calculation for the amount you already have saved, you need to subtract the future value of your existing savings from your total retirement savings target.  The future value is the amount to which your existing savings will grow by your retirement date.  The formula for future savings is:

where n is the number of years until you retire.  The annual return is the same return you’ve been using in the formulas above.  If you don’t want to deal with the exponent, the table below will help you figure out the factor by which to multiply your current amount saved.

After-tax Return

Years to Retirement
5 10 15 20 25 30 35

40

2%

1.10 1.22 1.35 1.49 1.64 1.81 2.00 2.21

3%

1.16 1.34 1.56 1.81 2.09 2.43 2.81 3.26

4%

1.22 1.48 1.80 2.19 2.67 3.24 3.95 4.80
5% 1.28 1.63 2.08 2.65 3.39 4.32 5.52

7.04

6% 1.34 1.79 2.40 3.21 4.29 5.74 7.69

10.29

7% 1.40 1.97 2.76 3.87 5.43 7.61 10.68

14.97

8% 1.47 2.16 3.17 4.66 6.85 10.06 14.79

21.72

Illustration of Adjustment for Existing Savings

Let’s say you have $50,000 in retirement savings, 25 years until you retire and have selected an annual return of 5%.  You would use the factor from the 5% row in the 25 years column of 3.39.  You multiply $50,000 by 3.39 to get $169,500.

If your total retirement savings target is $1,000,000, you subtract $169,500 and use an adjusted target of $830,500.  Using the same time to retirement and annual return, your annual savings target is 1.5% of $830,500 or $12,458.  This annual savings amount compares to $15,000 if you haven’t saved any money for retirement yet.

Caution

Having been subject to Actuarial Standards of Practice for most of my career (which started before the standards existed), I can’t finish this post without providing a caution.  All of the amounts that I’ve estimated in this post assume that you earn the average return in every year.  There aren’t any financial instruments that can guarantee that you’ll earn the same return year in and year out.  As mentioned above, riskier assets have more volatility in their returns.  That means that, while the average return is higher, the actual returns in any one year are likely to be further from the average than for less risky assets.

As such, you should be aware that the amounts shown for annual savings will NOT assure you that you will have your target amount in savings when you retire.  I suggest that, if possible, you set a higher target for your total retirement savings than you think you’ll really need or save more each year than the amounts resulting from these calculations. You don’t want to be in the situation in which my friend found herself at age 59 starting over financially.

 

The Best Ways to Pay Off Your Debt

The Best Ways to Pay Off Your Debt

The best way to pay off your short-term and revolving debt depends on your priorities and what motivates you.  Two of the common approaches for determining the order in which to re-pay your loans discussed in financial literacy circles are the Debt Snowball and Debt Avalanche approaches.

Both of these methods apply when you have more than one debt that needs to be re-paid.  If you have only one debt to re-pay, the best strategy is to pay it down as quickly as possible, making the minimum payments as often as you can to avoid finance charges which will be added to your principal in addition to the interest charges on any portion of your balance you don’t pay.

In this post, I’ll describe how the two debt-repayment methods work using some illustrations.  I will then help you understand which approach might be better for you.  For more information about the fundamentals of debt, check out my posts on loans and credit cards.

What’s Included and What’s Not

The debts covered by this post include credit cards (one kind of revolving debt), personal loans, car loans and other bills that are overdue. While longer-term loans, such as mortgages, are referenced in the budgeting process, I haven’t included them in the debt re-payment examples. If you have unpaid short-term debt, you’ll want to keep up with the payments on these longer-term loans first, but don’t need to pre-pay them. For this discussion, I will assume that you intend to re-pay all of your debts to your current debtholders. That is, you haven’t dug a hole so deep you need to declare bankruptcy and you don’t feel you’ll benefit from transferring some or all of your high-interest rate loan balances to one with a lower interest (i.e., debt consolidation).

Debt Snowball

Dave Ramsay, a well-known author on financial literacy topics, proposed the Debt Snowball method for paying off your debts.  Under this method, you do the following:

  1. Identify all of your debts, including the amounts of the minimum payments.
  2. Make a budget. (See this post for more on budgeting generally or this one for the first of a step-by-step series on budgeting including a helpful spreadsheet.) Your budget should include all of your expenses excluding your short-term and revolving debts but including the payments you plan to make on your longer-term debts (e.g., car loans and mortgages).
  3. Determine the total amount left in your budget available to re-pay your debts, remembering that you need to be able to pay for the total cost of all of your current purchases before you start paying off the balances on your existing debt. If the amount available to re-pay debts is less than the total of your minimum payments, you may need to look into your options to consolidate or re-structure your debts, get them forgiven or declare bankruptcy.
  4. Otherwise, make the minimum payment on all of your debts except the smallest one.
  5. Take everything left over in your budget from step (3) and reduce it by the sum of the minimum payments in step (4). Use that balance to pay off your smallest debt. After you fully re-pay the smallest debt, you’ll apply the remainder to the next smallest debt and so on.

Debt Avalanche

The Debt Avalanche method is very similar to the Debt Snowball method, except you re-pay your debts in a different order.

The first three steps under the Debt Avalanche method are the same as the first three steps under the Debt Snowball method.  It differs from the Debt Snowball method in that you pay the minimum payment on all of your debts except the one with the highest interest rate at any given time instead of the one with the smallest balance.

Examples

I’ve created the two examples to compare the two methods.  In both examples, I have assumed that you use a different credit card or pay cash for all new purchases until your current credit card balances are re-paid.  That is, to make progress on getting out of debt, you need to not only make extra payments on your existing debts, but also not create additional debt by borrowing to pay for new purchases.  It’s tough!

Example 1

In this example, you have two debts with the balances due, interest rates and minimum payments shown in the table below.

Example 1 Balance Due Interest Rate Minimum Payment
Debt 1 $1,500 20% $30
Debt 2 500 10% 10

You have determined you have  $100 available to pay off these two debts.  The minimum payments total $40 in this example, so you have $60 available to pay off more of the principal on your debts.

Example 1: Debt Snowball

Under the Debt Snowball method, you will use the additional $60 a month you have to pay off Debt 2 first, as it has the smaller balance.  That is, you will pay the minimum payment of $30 a month on Debt 1 and $70 a month on Debt 2 for 8 months, at which point Debt 2 will be fully re-paid.  You will then apply the full $100 a month to Debt 1 for the next 17 months until it is fully re-paid

Under this approach, you will have fully re-paid both debts in 25 months and will pay $428 in interest charges.

Example 1:  Debt Avalanche

In Example 1, you will use the additional $60 a month you have to pay off Debt 1 first under the Debt Avalanche method, as it has the higher interest rate, whereas you used the additional amount to pay off Debt 2 first under the Debt Snowball method.  That is, you will pay the minimum balance of $10 a month on Debt 2 and $90 a month on Debt 1 for 20 months, at which point Debt 1 will be fully re-paid.  You will then apply the full $100 a month to Debt 2 for the next 4 months until it is fully re-paid

Under this approach, you will have fully re-paid both debts in 24 months and will pay $352 in interest charges.

Example 2

In this example, you have five debts with the balances due, interest rates and minimum payments shown in the table below.

Example 2 Balance Due Interest Rate Minimum Payment
Debt 1 $1,000 10% $40
Debt 2 500 0% 25
Debt 3 10,000 20% 100
Debt 4 3,000 15% 75
Debt 5 750 5% 30

You have $500 available to pay off these debts.  In this example, the minimum payments total $270, so you have $230 available to pay off the principal on your debts in addition to the principal included in the minimum payments.

Example 2: Debt Snowball

Example 2 is a bit more complicated because there are more debts.  As a reminder, under this approach, you apply all of your extra payments ($230 in this example) to the smallest debt at each point in time.  In this example, you will make the additional payments on your debts in the following order:

Debt 2

Debt 5

Debt 1

Debt 4

Debt 3

It takes only two months to pay off Debt 2 and another four months to pay off Debt 4.  As such, you will have fully re-paid two of your debts in six months.  In total, it will take 43 months to re-pay all of your loans and you will pay $5,800 in interest.

Example 2:  Debt Avalanche

In this example, you will make the additional payments on your debts in the following order:

Debt 3

Debt 4

Debt 1

Debt 5

Debt 2

It turns out that Debt 2 is fully re-paid in 20 months even just making the minimum payments.  Debt 5 is paid off 7 months later again with only minimum payments, followed by Debt 1 2 months later.  As each of these debts is re-paid, the amounts of their minimum payments are added to the payment on Debt 3 until it is fully re-paid after 39 months.  At that point, the full $500 a month is applied towards Debt 4 which then takes only 2 additional months to fully re-pay.  In total, it will take 41 months to re-pay all of your loans and you will pay $5,094 in interest.

Comparison

Dollars and Sense – Two Examples

Looking at the two examples, we can get a sense for how much more interest you will pay if you use the Debt Snowball method instead of the Debt Avalanche method.  The table below compares the two methods under both examples.

Example 1 Example 2
Interest Paid Months of Payments Interest Paid Months of Payments
Snowball $428 25 $5,800 43
Avalanche 352 24 5,094 41
Difference 74 1 706 2

In these two examples, you pay more than 10% more interest if you use the Debt Snowball method than the Debt Avalanche method, leading to one or two additional months before your debts are fully re-paid.

Dollars and Sense – In General

The difference in the amount of additional interest depends on whether your debts are similar in size and the differences in the interest rates.  I’ll take that statement apart to help you understand it.

  • If the debt with the lower interest rate is very small, you will pay it off quickly.  As a result, there is only a very short period of time during which you are paying the higher interest on the larger loan under the Debt Snowball method.  As such, there will be very little difference in the total amount of interest paid between the two methods in that case.
  • If the debts all have about the same interest rate, it doesn’t really matter which one you re-pay first, as the interest charges on that first loan will be very similar to the interest charges on your other loans.

Dollars and Sense – Illustration

The graph below illustrates the impact of the differences in interest rates and sizes of two loans on the difference in the total interest paid.  To create this graph, I took different variations of Example 1.  That is, you have two loans with outstanding balances totaling $2,000 and the interest rate on the larger debt is 20%.

 

How to Read the Axes

The interest rate on the smaller loan was calculated as 20% minus the increment shown on the axis labeled on the right.  That is, the interest rate on the smaller loan for scenarios near the “front” of the graph was 18% or 2 percentage points lower than the 20% interest rate on the larger loan.  Near the “back” of the graph, the interest rate on the smaller loan is 0% or 20 percentage points lower than the interest rate on the larger loan.

The loan balance on the smaller loan divided by the total debt amount of $2,000 is shown on the axis that goes from left to right.  The small loan is $40 (2% of $2,000) at the far left of the graph and increases as you move to the right to $960 (48% of $2,000) on the far right.  Note that, if the small loan exceeded $1,000, it would have become the bigger loan!

The Green Curve

The green curve corresponds to the total interest paid using the Debt Snowball method minus the total interest paid using the Debt Avalanche method.  For example, at the front left, corresponding to the small loan being $40 with an 18% (=20% – 2%) interest rate, there is a $2 difference in the amount of interest paid.  At the other extreme, in the back right of the graph (0% interest rate on a small loan with a balance of $960), you will pay $167 more in interest ($308 versus $140 or more than twice as much) if you use the Debt Snowball method rather than the Debt Avalanche method.

What It Means

Interestingly, moving along only one axis – that is, only decreasing the interest rate on the small loan or only increasing the size of the smaller loan – doesn’t make very much difference.  In the back left and front right, the interest rate differences are only $15 and $22, respectively.  The savings from the Debt Avalanche method becomes most important when there is a large difference in the interest rates on the loans and the outstanding balances on the loans are similar in size.

Sense of Accomplishment

For many people, debt is an emotional or “mental-state” issue rather than a financial problem.  In those situations, it is more important to gain a sense of accomplishment than it is to save money on interest.  If you are one of those people  and have one or more small debts that you can fully re-pay fairly quickly (such as Debts 2 and 5 in Example 2 both of which were paid off in six months under the Debt Snowball method), using the Debt Snowball method is likely to be much more successful.

Key Points

Here are the key points from this post:

  • A budget will help you figure out how much you can afford to apply to your debts each month.
  • If you can’t cover your minimum payments, you’ll need to consider some form of consolidation, re-financing or even bankruptcy, none of which are covered in this post.
  • If you have only one debt to re-pay, the best strategy is to pay it down as quickly as possible, but making the minimum payments as often as you can to avoid finance charges.
  • You will always pay at least as much, and often more, interest when you use the Debt Snowball method as compared to the Debt Avalanche method.
  • Unless you have two or more debts that are all about the same size and have widely varying interest rates, the total interest you will pay is essentially the same regardless of the order in which you re-pay them.  As such, if the sense of accomplishment you get from paying off a few debts will help keep you motivated, using the Debt Snowball method may be the right choice for you.
  • If you have two or more debts that are all about the same size and have disparate interest rates, you will want to use the Debt Avalanche Approach.  Because the balances are all about the same, it will take about the same amount of time to re-pay the first loan regardless of which loan you choose to re-pay first!  As such, it is better to focus on the interest you will save by using the Debt Avalanche approach.

 

Tax-Efficient Investing Strategies – Canada

Tax-Effective-Investing-Canada

You can increase your savings through tax-efficient investing. Tax-efficient investing is the process of maximizing your after-tax investment returns by buying your invested assets in the “best” account from a tax perspective. You may have savings in a taxable account and/or in one or more types of tax-sheltered retirement accounts. Your investment returns are taxed differently depending on the type of account in which you hold your invested assets. In this post, I’ll provide a quick overview of the taxes applicable to each type of account (since I cover taxes on retirement plans in much greater detail in this post) and provide guidelines for how to invest tax-efficiently.

The strategy for tax-efficient investing differs from one country to the next due to differences in tax laws so I’ll talk about tax-efficient investing strategies in the Canada in this post. For information about tax-efficient investing in the US, check out this post.

Types of Investment Returns

I will look at four different types of investments:

  • Individual stocks with high dividends
  • Mutual funds
  • Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) with no dividends
  • Bonds

I will not look at individual stocks with little or no dividends. The returns on those stocks are essentially the same as the returns on ETFs and are taxed in the same manner.

The table below shows the different types of returns on each of these investments.

Type of Distribution: Interest Dividends Capital Gains Capital Gain Distributions
High dividend stocks x x
Mutual Funds x x x
ETFs x
Bonds x x

 

Cash Distributions

Interest and dividends are cash payments that the issuers of financial instruments (i.e., stocks, mutual funds or bonds) make to owners.

Capital Gains

Capital gains come from changes in the value of your investment. You pay taxes on capital gains only when you sell the financial instrument which then makes them realized capital gains. The taxable amount of the realized capital gain is the difference between the amount you receive when you sell the financial instrument and the amount you paid for it when you bought it. Unrealized capital gains are changes in the value of any investment you haven’t yet sold. If the value of an investment is less than what you paid for it, you are said to have a capital loss which can be thought of as a negative capital gain.

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are a bit different from stocks and ETFs. They can have the following types of taxable returns.

  • Dividends – A mutual fund dividend is a distribution of some or all of the dividends that the mutual fund manager has received from the issuers of the securities owned by the mutual fund.
  • Capital gain distributions – Capital gain distributions are money the mutual fund manager pays to owners when a mutual fund sells some of its assets.
  • Capital gains – As with other financial instruments, you pay tax on the difference between the amount you receive when you sell a mutual fund and the amount you paid for it.

Tax Rates

The four types of distributions are taxed differently depending on the type of account in which they are held – Taxable, Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA).

Accounts other than Retirement Accounts

I’ll refer to accounts that aren’t retirement accounts as taxable accounts.   You pay taxes every year on dividends and realized capital gains in a taxable account, whereas you pay them either when you contribute to or withdraw from a retirement account. The table below shows how the different types of investment returns are taxed when they are earned in a taxable account.

Type of Investment Return Tax Rates
Interest & Dividends Same as wages
Realized capital gains & capital gain distributions 50% of capital gains and capital gain distributions are added to wages

The marginal Federal tax rate on wages, and therefore on interest and dividends, for many employed Canadian residents is likely to be 20.5% or 26%.

In a taxable account, you pay taxes on investment returns when you receive them. In the case of capital gains, you are considered to have received them when you sell the financial instrument.

TFSA Retirement Accounts

Before you put money into a TFSA, you pay taxes on it. Once it has been put into the TFSA, you pay no more income taxes regardless of the type of investment return. As such, the tax rate on all investment returns held in a TFSA is 0%.

RRSP Retirement Accounts

You pay income taxes on the total amount of your withdrawal from an RRSP at your ordinary income tax rate. Between the time you make a contribution and withdraw the money, you don’t pay any income taxes on your investment returns.

After-Tax Returns by Type of Account

To illustrate the differences in taxes on each of these four financial instruments, I’ll look at how much you would have if you have $1,000 to invest in each type of account at the end of one year and the end of 10 years.

Here are the assumptions I made regarding pre-tax investment returns.

Annual Pre-tax Investment Return % Interest Dividends Capital Gains
Stocks 0% 3% 5%
ETFs 0% 0% 8%
Mutual Funds 0% 3% 5%
Bonds 4% 0% 0%

Mutual funds usually distribute some or all of realized capital gains to owners. That is, if you own a mutual fund, you are likely to get receive cash from the mutual fund manager related to realized capital gains. Whenever those distributions are made, you have to pay tax on them. For this illustration, I’ve assumed that the mutual fund manager distributes all capital gains to owners, so they are taxed every year.

Here are the tax rates I used for this illustration.

Type of Income Tax Rate
Wages 26%
Interest & Dividends 26%
Capital Gains 13%

One-Year Investment Period

Let’s say you have $1,000 in each account. If you put it in a taxable account, I assume you pay taxes at the end of the year on the investment returns. If you put the money in an RRSP, I assume that you withdraw all of your money and pay taxes at the end of the year on the entire amount at your ordinary income tax rate. (I’ve assumed you are old enough that you don’t have to pay a penalty on withdrawals without penalty from the retirement accounts.)

The table below shows your after-tax investment returns after one year from your initial $1,000. Note that the pre-tax returns are the same as the returns in the TFSA row, as you don’t pay income taxes on returns you earn in your TFSA.

One-Year After-tax Investment Returns ($) Stocks Mutual Funds ETFs Bonds
Taxable $66 $66 $70 $30
RRSP 59 59 59 30
TFSA 80 80 80 40

This table below shows the taxes you paid on your returns during that year.

Taxes Paid Stocks Mutual Funds ETFs Bonds
Taxable $14 $14 $10 $10
RRSP 21 21 21 10
TFSA 0 0 0 0

When looking at these charts, remember that you paid income taxes on the money you contributed to your Taxable account and TFSA before you put it in the account.  Those taxes are not considered in these comparisons. This post focuses on only the taxes you pay on your investment returns.

Comparison Different Financial Instruments Within Each Type of Account

Looking at across the rows, you can see that, for each type of account, stocks and mutual funds have the same one-year returns and tax payments. In this illustration, both stocks and mutual funds have the same split between dividends and appreciation. Your after-tax return on ETFs is higher than either stocks or mutual funds. All of the ETF return is assumed to be in the form of appreciation (i.e., no dividends), so only the lower capital-gain tax rate applies to your returns.

In all accounts, bonds have a lower after-tax return than any of the other three investments. Recall, though, that bonds generally provide a lower return on investment than stocks because they are less risky.

Comparison of Each Financial Instrument in Different Types of Accounts

Looking down the columns, you can see the impact of the differences in tax rates by type of account for each financial instrument. You have more savings at the end of the year if you purchase a financial instrument in a TFSA than if you purchase it in either of the other two accounts for each type of investment.

The returns on investments in a taxable account are higher than on stocks, mutual funds and ETFs held in an RRSP.  You pay taxes on the returns in a taxable account at their respective tax rates, i.e., at 50% of your usual rate on the capital gain portion of your investment return.  However, you pay taxes on RRSP withdrawals at your full ordinary income tax rate.  Because the ordinary income tax rate is higher than the capital gain tax rate, you have a higher after-tax return if you invest in a taxable account than an RRSP for one year.  For bonds, the taxes and after-tax returns are the same in an RRSP and a taxable account because you pay taxes on returns in taxable accounts and distributions from RRSPs at your marginal ordinary income tax rate.

Remember, though, that you had to pay income taxes on the money you put into your account before you made the contribution, whereas you didn’t pay income taxes on the money before you put it into your RRSP.

Ten-Year Investment Period

I’ve used the same assumptions in the 10-year table below, with the exception that I’ve assumed that you will pay ordinary income taxes at a lower rate in 10 years because you will have retired by then. I’ve assumed that your marginal tax rate on ordinary income in retirement will be 20.5%.

Ten-Year After-Tax Investment Returns ($) Stocks Mutual Funds ETFs Bonds
Taxable $917 $890 $1,008 $339
RRSP 921 921 921 382
TFSA 1,159 1,159 1,159 480

Comparison Different Financial Instruments Within Each Type of Account

If you look across the rows, you see that you end up with the same amount of savings by owning stocks, mutual funds and ETFs if you put them in either of the retirement account options. The mix between capital gains, capital gain distributions and dividends doesn’t impact taxes paid in a tax-sheltered account, whereas it makes a big difference in taxable accounts, as can be seen by looking in the Taxable row.

In taxable accounts, ETFs provide the highest after-tax return because they don’t have any taxable transactions until you sell them.  As discussed above, I have assumed that the stocks pay dividends every year.  You have to pay taxes on the dividends before you can reinvest them, thereby reducing your overall savings as compared to an ETF.  You have to pay taxes on both dividends and capital gain distributions from mutual funds before you can reinvest those proceeds, so they provide the least amount of savings of the three stock-like financial instruments in a taxable account.

Comparison of Each Financial Instrument in Different Types of Accounts

Looking down the columns, we can compare your ending savings after 10 years from each financial instrument by type of account. You earn the highest after-tax return for every financial instrument if it is held in a TFSA, as you don’t pay any taxes.

For bonds, you earn a higher after-tax return in an RRSP than in a taxable account. The tax rate on interest is about the same as the tax rate on RRSP withdrawals. When you hold a bond in a taxable account, you have to pay income taxes every year on the coupons you earn before you can reinvest them. In an RRSP, you don’t pay tax until you withdraw the money, so you get the benefit of interest compounding (discussed in this post) before taxes.  In addition, I have assumed that your ordinary income tax rate is lower in retirement, i.e., when you make your RRSP withdrawals.

Your after-tax return is slightly lower in a taxable account than in an RRSP for the three stock-like investments. The ability to compound your returns on a pre-tax basis more than offsets the higher tax rate you pay in the RRSP.

Illustration of Tax Deferral Benefit

The ability to compound your investment returns on a tax-deferred basis is an important one, so I’ll provide an illustration. To keep the illustration simple, let’s assume you have an asset that has a taxable return of 8% every year and that your tax rate is constant at 26% (regardless of the type of account).

The table below shows what happens over a three-year period.

Returns and Taxes by Year Taxable Account RRSP
Initial Investment $1,000 $1,000
Return – Year 1 80 80
Tax – Year 1 21 0
Balance – Year 1 1,059 1,080
Return – Year 2 85 86
Tax – Year 2 22 0
Balance – Year 2 1,122 1,166
Return – Year 3 90 94
Tax – Year 3 23 0
Balance – Year 3 1,188 1,260

By paying taxes in each year, you reduce the amount you have available to invest in subsequent years so you have less return.

The total return earned in the taxable account over three years is $255; in the tax-deferred account, $260. The total of the taxes for the taxable account is $66. Multiplying the $260 of return in the tax-deferred account by the 26% tax rate gives us $68 of taxes from that account. As such, the after-tax returns after three years are $188 in the taxable account and $192 in the tax-deferred account.

These differences might not seem very large, but they continue to compound the longer you hold your investments. For example, after 10 years, your after-tax returns on the tax-deferred account, using the above assumptions, would be almost 10% higher than on the taxable account.

Portfolios Using Tax-Efficient Investing

It is great to know that you get to keep the highest amount of your investment returns if you hold your financial instruments in a TFSA. However, there are limits on how much you can put in TFSAs each year. Also, some employers offer only an RRSP option. As a result, you may have savings that are currently invested in more than one of TFSA, RRSP or taxable account. You therefore will need to buy financial instruments in all three accounts, not just in a TFSA.

Here are some guidelines that will help you figure out which financial instruments to buy in each account:

  • If there is a wide difference in total return, you’ll want to put your highest returning investments in your TFSA.
  • For smaller differences in total return (e.g., less than 2 – 3 percentage points), it is better to put instruments with more distributions in your RRSP and then your TFSA, putting as few of them as possible in your taxable account.
  • Instruments with slightly higher yields, but little to no distributions can be put in your taxable account.
  • You’ll want to hold your lower return, higher distribution financial instruments, such as bonds, in your RRSP. There is a benefit to holding bonds in an RRSP as compared to a taxable account. The same tax rates apply to both accounts, but you don’t have to pay taxes until you withdraw the money from your RRSP, whereas you pay them annually in your taxable account.

Applying Tax-Efficient Investing to Two Portfolios

Let’s see how to apply these guidelines in practice using a couple of examples. To make the examples a bit more interesting, I’ve increased the annual appreciation on the ETF to 10% from 8%, assuming it is a higher risk/higher return type of ETF than the one discussed above. All of the other returns and tax assumptions are the same as in the table earlier in this post.

Portfolio Example 1

In the first example, you have $10,000 in each of a taxable account, an RRSP and a TFSA. You’ve decided that you want to invest equally in stocks, mutual funds and ETFs.

You will put your investment with the lowest taxable distributions each year – the ETF – in your taxable account. The stocks and mutual fund have higher taxable distributions each year, so it is better to put them in your tax-sheltered accounts. Because they have similar total returns in this example, it doesn’t matter how you allocate your stocks and mutual funds between your TFSA and RRSP.

Portfolio Example 2

In the second example, you again have $10,000 in each of a taxable account, an RRSP and a TFSA. In this example, you want to invest $15,000 in the high-yielding ETFs but offset the risk of that increased investment by buying $5,000 in bonds. You’ll split the remaining $10,000 evenly between stocks and mutual funds.

You again buy as much of your ETFs as you can in your taxable account. The remainder is best put in your TFSA, as the ETFs have the highest total return so you don’t want to pay any tax on the money when you withdraw it. The bonds have the lowest return, so it is best to put them in your RRSP as you will pay less tax on the lower bond returns than the higher stock or mutual fund returns. As in Example 1, it doesn’t matter how you allocate your stocks and mutual funds between your TFSA and RRSP.

Risks of Tax-Efficient Investing

There is a very important factor I’ve ignored in all of the above discussion – RISK (a topic I cover in great detail in this post). The investment returns I used above are all risky. That is, you won’t earn 3% dividends and 5% appreciation every year on the stocks or mutual funds or 10% on the ETFs. Those may be the long-term averages for the particular financial instruments I’ve used in the illustration, but you will earn a different percentage every year.

If your time horizon is short, say less than five to ten years, you’ll want to consider the chance that one or more of your financial instruments will lose value over that time frame. If you had perfect foresight, you would put your money-losing investments in your RRSP because you would reduce the portion of your taxable income taxed at the higher ordinary income tax by the amount of the loss when you withdraw the money. Just as the government gets a share of your profits, it also shares in your losses.

The caution is that financial instruments with higher returns also tend to be riskier. If you put your highest return investments – the ETFs in my example – in your TFSA, their value might decrease over a short time horizon. If they decrease, your after-tax loss is the full amount of the loss. If, instead, you had put that financial instrument in your RRSP, the government would share 26% of the loss in my example.

In conclusion, if you plan to allocate your investments using the above guidelines, be sure to adjust them if your time horizon is shorter than about 10 years to minimize the chance that you will have to keep all of a loss on any one financial instrument.