Don’t Make these Financial Mistakes

The world is going through a very difficult phase. Everywhere we are hearing that we need to get adjusted to the ‘new normal’. Nothing is normal as it used to be. Children are not able to go to schools.   Most people are working from home.  Healthcare professionals are working day and night for the recovery of people who get COVID-19.  In this situation, it’s quite natural that the economic situation is not good. Many people have lost jobs or are facing pay cuts and experts are predicting that an economic recession will set in.  We don’t have any control over this situation. But, what we can do is safeguard our finances, as much as we can, and avoid financial mistakes during this COVID-19 financial emergency.

Here are a few financial mistakes you should avoid.

Satisfying Wants to Avoid Boredom

Have you been browsing online shopping websites and ordering items? Is it because you need them or just to avoid boredom?

When the lockdown started, people were stockpiling grocery items. Now focus has shifted to buying items like clothes, books, entertainment things, and so on. So, in both situations, people are overspending.

But, now is not the time to do so. Rather, you should try to save as much as you can. We will discuss how to save more later in this article.

If you are getting bored at home, nurture a hobby (hopefully an inexpensive one). Do something which you’ve always wanted but didn’t get time to do so. If you wish, you can also do some online jobs as per your liking.

Following the Same Budget

Are you following your budget? You might say that you’re following it and saving. Good! But it’s a mistake. You’ll ask why? Because it’s necessary to re-assess your budget in light of the current situation and make modifications if required. If you’ve done that, well done!

If you still have income, it is time to save as much as possible. Doing so, you can be prepared for any future rainy days. If you save more, you won’t have to worry as much about losing your job. You know that you’ll be able to sustain yourself for a few months.

You can practice frugal budgeting to save more. Frugal budgeting doesn’t mean you’ll have to compromise with eating healthy or compromise with your life; it means to cut unnecessary expenses and increase your savings.

Overspending that Doesn’t Fit in your Budget

It is better to avoid buying big-ticket items during this time. Try to delay satisfying your wants for the time being.

To illustrate the previous point, let me highlight a survey conducted in January 2020 in Nebraska by First National Bank of Omaha.  It showed that about 50% of people in our country have a pay check to pay check lifestyle. So, it becomes quite tough to meet daily necessities when they face job loss, which has happened during this pandemic.

Therefore, you should try to have a good cash reserve. To do so, you need to save more and keep the amount in a high-yield savings account.

Check out how these ways to save more that you might be overlooking:

  • Stop eating out and have nutritious homemade food which is healthier too
  • Have a list when you go grocery shopping and don’t buy anything extra
  • Switch to debit cards if that can help you reduce your expenditures
  • Cancel your gym membership and work out in fresh air
  • Check out your magazine subscriptions and cancel if you rarely read them
  • Opt for bundling offers of television and internet
  • Opt for public schooling of kids instead of private schools
  • Start envelope budgeting to save more
  • Set temperature of water heater to 120 degrees to save electricity
  • Clip coupons and use them to save money

Using your Emergency Fund for Daily Necessities

Emergency funds are for rainy days. But, don’t touch it if you can manage without it.

Check how much you have in your emergency fund. Will you be able to sustain for about 6 months without a pay check? If not, try to have that amount in your emergency fund.

Do not touch your fund unless it’s an emergency. And, if you have to use it, try to save the required funds after the situation becomes normal and you start getting your usual pay check.

Every month, try to save a definite amount in your emergency fund. And, the account should be easily accessible so that you can withdraw funds whenever you need it.

Of course, if your emergency savings is the only thing between you and not paying your bills, you can start spending it.

Not using Available HSA funds

Instead of using your emergency fund for medical treatment, use your pre-tax HSA (Health Savings Account) funds. You can use the funds to get treated or tested for Coronavirus if required. You can even use the funds to consult a therapist if you’re anxious or depressed during this pandemic.

Delaying Filing your Taxes if You’re Eligible for a Refund

As per the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act, the federal tax filing deadline has been extended to July 15, 2020, including any estimated tax payments for 2020. But, if you’re eligible for a refund, file your taxes.

As per IRS, the average refund is about $2,908 this year. It can help you to cover your living expenses or even make debt payments during this pandemic.

Not Paying the Entire Amount on your Credit Cards

It is a mistake to make only the minimum payments on your credit cards. If you do so, you’ll have to pay the interest on the outstanding balance every month. Therefore, it is always better to pay the entire balance on your cards every billing cycle if you possibly can. So, before swiping your cards, check out whether or not you’ll be able to make the entire payment in the billing cycle.

Also, use your reward points if you’re ordering things online; otherwise, your reward points may expire.

If required and if the creditors agree, you can take out a balance transfer card and transfer your existing balance to the new card. Usually, a balance transfer card comes with an introductory period of zero or low-interest rate. So, repay the transferred balance within that period.

However, after making the payment, do not cancel your existing cards especially if they have a long credit history.  If you cancel cards, the credit limit and the history of credit will reduce thereby affecting your credit score negatively.

Getting Panicked and Selling Stocks

Selling stocks after a stock market decline is one of the major financial mistakes that often people commit. They sell stocks when the market is down. But, have faith. The market will surely recover. Do not touch your investment portfolio at this time. The market recovered even after the economic crisis of 2009. However, it may take a bit more time. So, do not sell stocks right at this moment.

Another thing that the financial advisers always tell not to do is check your portfolio every day. It will make you stressed. Instead, if you have an additional amount after meeting your necessities, you can invest it in stocks as the prices are low.

Withdrawing from Retirement Accounts without Considering the Cons

The CARES Act has made it quite easy to withdraw funds from your retirement accounts, such as IRAs (Individual Retirement Account) and 401(k)s.

Here are a few advantages of withdrawing funds:

  • You can borrow up to $100,000 from your 401(k) plan.
  • You can withdraw $100,000 from any qualified retirement plan without having to pay an early withdrawal penalty.
  • You have 3 years to repay the amount without paying any income tax on the withdrawn amount.

The main advantage of starting to save early in such retirement accounts is to take advantage of compound interest. However, if you withdraw, you’ll lose the benefit to some extent. So, weigh the pros and cons before opting for this.

Not Reviewing your Financial Condition with your Financial Advisor

It is not a good idea to skip reviewing your financial situation with your financial advisor. It is rather more important at this time to have a clear view of your financial situation.

Discuss with your financial advisor how you need to maintain your investment portfolio and what moves you need to take. Talk about your financial goals and how you’ll implement them.

Taking on Debts without Thinking about How to Manage

Mortgage rates are comparatively low. You may feel the urge to take out a loan to meet your daily necessities if you’re facing financial problems. However, it is better not to take out additional debts that you can’t handle.

However, if you’re already having difficulty managing your existing debts, you can consolidate your debt. You don’t have to meet with a debt consolidator in person. You can just call a good consolidation company and seek help.

Sitting in Front of a Screen

At last, I would like to mention that it is quite important to stay physically and mentally healthy during this time. So, do not be stressed. Restrict your screen timing and have some me-time. Do something which you like. Nurture a hobby. Use this opportunity to spend time with kids and family members.

Enjoy quality time and take help from your family members to manage finances efficiently. Not committing these mistakes can help you have a better financial future.

About Good Nelly

Good Nelly is a financial writer who lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She has started her financial journey long back. Good Nelly has been associated with Debt Consolidation Care for a long time. Through her writings, she has helped people overcome their debt problems and has solved personal finance related queries. She has also written for some other websites and blogs. You can follow her Twitter profile.

Do I Need a Financial Planner?

Do I Need a Financial Planner?

Creating your own financial plan can be a daunting task. If you aren’t sure where to get started or have a plan but want to improve it, a financial planner might be able to help. I’ve never used a financial planner, so I interviewed two friends who use a planner and Graeme Hughes[1], The Money Geek, to get their insights and perspectives.

In this post, I’ll first distinguish financial planners from other types of financial advisors. The rest of the post provides responses to questions asked by a few of my readers to help you with the following:

  • Figure out whether and how a financial planner can help you.
  • Prepare for your first meeting with a financial planner.
  • Understand the process for developing a financial plan and the deliverables.
  • Select a financial planner who meets your needs.

Financial Planners vs Other Financial Advisors

There are many types of advisors who can help you with your finances. In this post, I’ll focus on professionals who provide financial planning services. These professionals can be independent advisors, work for firms that perform solely financial planning services or can be employed by mutual fund companies, stock brokerage firms (e.g., Schwab or Morgan Stanley), other financial institutions (e.g., Ameriprise) or other types of firms (e.g., accounting firms). Most of these financial planners provide a brand range of services intended to assist you in creating a sound financial plan and attaining your financial goals.

Types of Other Financial Advisors

There are many other types of financial advisors, some of whom may be called financial planners, who specialize in segments of your financial plan. Examples of these advisors include:

  • Insurance agents who can assist you in finding the best insurance policies to meet your needs. Some insurance agents specialize in just property & casualty lines (such as residences, cars or umbrella policies) or health or life insurance or annuities, while others can assist with several or all types of personal insurance.
  • Stock brokers who provide advice about specific companies or financial instruments in which you might want to invest.
  • Money managers who make decisions about what to buy and sell in your portfolio and execute the transactions.
  • Debt consultants or consolidators who can help you find the best strategy for paying off your debts.
  • Tax accountants and tax lawyers who can provide advice about your tax situation and how it might impact your financial decisions. Tax accountants can also prepare your tax returns.

What’s Best for You

You’ll want to choose an advisor who has the right expertise to address your questions. If you want help with your overall financial plan, a financial planner is best. If you go to an advisor with a narrower focus in that situation, you might not get the best information for your overall financial health. For example, an insurance agent who specializes in life insurance and annuities would be less likely to focus on non-insurance savings mechanisms, such as 401k’s or exchange-traded funds, than a financial planner with a broader area of expertise.

To be clear, all of these types of advisors can be very valuable in refining your financial plan, but you’ll want to make sure you have the right expectations about their expertise. In fact, your financial planner may refer you to one or more of these consultants on a specific aspect of your financial plan.

What Services do Financial Planners Provide?

The primary service provided by a financial planner is the development of a sound financial plan. This process can include assistance with setting financial goals, budgeting, estate planning, retirement planning, selection of insurance coverages and investment strategies.

The specific services provided will be tailored to your needs. If you are just getting started, the financial planner may focus on identifying goals and creating a budget. If you already have a financial plan and want increased comfort that you will meet your goals, these services could be as sophisticated as statistical (Monte Carlo) modeling of your future financial situations under a wide range of assumptions regarding future investment returns.

As part of or before your first meeting, a good financial planner will ask about the current status of your finances and what your goals are for deliverables to make sure the planner helps you in a way that makes sense for you.

Do I Need a Financial Planner?

Using a financial planner is a matter of personal preference. I’ve never used one, but my background as an actuary and working with the finance and risk management departments of insurance companies has given me the confidence to go it alone. However, most people can benefit from good advice. As Graeme says, though, “You only need to be careful not to pay for more than you need.” His thoughts about the services you might want to use by age are:

  • A young person starting out might get counseling on budgeting, savings strategies, how much to save, and which tax-advantaged accounts to use.
  • Middle-aged individuals with more substantial savings ($100K+) might want to get an assessment of where they stand for retirement and how much to save to meet their retirement income goals, considering all of the resources at their disposal.
  • Pre-retirees (5-10 years out) will want to have a comprehensive plan to ensure they have adequately covered all likely scenarios, so they can be confident in their retirement plans before pulling the plug on work.

If you have enough assets for it to matter and aren’t highly confident you are on track to meet your goals or you suspect there are gaps in your knowledge, a professional financial planner can help.

For a different perspective on using a financial planner, check out this article from Schwab that I happened to read as I was writing this post.

What Will I Get?

Primary Deliverable

The most important deliverable from a financial planner is a financial plan. Depending on where you are in the process of managing your finances, it will include some or all of the following items:

  • Your financial goals
  • A statement of your current financial position (assets and debt)
  • A budget
  • Your savings strategies and actions, including
    • Short-term savings
    • Designated savings
    • Retirement savings, sometimes including investment advice
  • A plan for re-paying your current debt
  • Guidance about the types and amounts of insurance to buy, along with descriptions of your current policies
  • A brief description of your income tax situation
  • Guidance on what needs to be done to ensure that the legal documents are in place in case you become incapacitated or die

Other Deliverables

In addition, financial planners can provide longer term projections that show estimates of the growth in your income, assets (from investment returns and additions to savings) and expenses. These types of projections can provide insights about your ability to retire when and in the style you want.

Another benefit of working with a financial planner is that you can get referrals to other advisors and can become aware of other financial resources to help with different aspects of your financial life. For example, most financial planners do not draft legal documents, such as wills, trust agreements or powers of attorney. Many financial planners, though, have worked with lawyers who have this expertise and can provide you with a referral.

How Should I Prepare?

All financial planners have their own unique processes. As such, you’ll want to ask your planner the format of the information he or she would like to see. Many planners will provide you with a questionnaire and/or an information request to guide you through the process of compiling your information. Nonetheless, there are a number of fundamental pieces of information that every financial planner will request. They are your:

  • Assets, including retirement accounts
  • Liabilities
  • Income
  • Monthly expenses
  • Current or future defined benefit pension benefits
  • Financial goals
  • Values

Graeme was quite clear that the numerical values above should be firm, accurate numbers, not guesses. It will take some time to compile all of this information, but will ensure that you get the best service from your financial planner. He also added that you should “run away” from any planner who makes recommendations before obtaining this information.

What is the Process?

You are likely to meet with your financial planner once or twice to create or refine your financial plan initially. Some planners prefer to learn about your finances by reviewing documents and answers you provide to their questionnaires. Other planners prefer to have an introductory meeting to learn about you and your finances. In either case, the financial planner wants to learn your objectives and concerns, along with your family structure.

The financial planner will then assess your situation and goals, identify gaps and challenges, and determine the most appropriate strategy for ensuring your goals will be met. The planner will prepare a financial plan and an investment plan, including an asset allocation assessment for investments, and provide them to you in writing.

Your financial planner will then meet with you in person to present the plan and make recommendations. You and your planner will then identify the action items that come out of the plan and assign them to either you or the planner, depending on their nature and your planner’s areas of expertise.

How Often Should I Check Back In?

Financial planning is not a “one and done” exercise. You’ll want to track your progress against your plan and adjust it as necessary. Adjustments might be needed as there are changes in the economy and investing markets or changes in your personal life, such as marriage, a death in the family, children, or a change in your goals.

If both your life and the economy are fairly stable, once a year may be often enough to meet with your financial planner. More typically, you’ll want to check in with your financial planner twice a year. Of course, if you have any life changes, it will also be a good time to check in with your financial planner to see if any tweaks or more significant changes to your financial plan are indicated.

How are Financial Planners Paid?

There are a number of different ways in which financial planners are paid. Here are some of the more common options.

No Charge

If you use a financial planner at a brokerage firm or mutual fund company, you can often get some financial planning services at no charge. The more money you hold at the brokerage firm, the more services you can get at no charge.

Fixed Fees Per Service

Many independent financial planners will provide services on a fixed-fee basis. That is, they will charge you a fixed cost for each of the different aspects of your financial plan with which they provide assistance. Financial planners at brokerage firms also can charge fixed fees for services that are beyond those that are provided at no cost.

Commissions

Financial planners who also sell products, such as insurance or mutual funds, are often paid based on the products you purchase through them. For example, sellers of insurance are often paid 5% to 15% of the premium on the policies you purchase.

Percentage of Assets

Although it is more common with people who manage your money than with advisors who help you with your financial plan, some financial planners are paid as a percentage of the market value of your assets that they manage. This type of compensation is also common for financial planners who work for mutual fund companies.

What’s Best for You

When you get advice from a financial planner, you’ll want to understand the possible biases introduced by the form of their compensation. The vast majority of financial planners are ethical and are focused on your best interests. Nonetheless, you’ll want to be aware of the possibility that the solution proposed by a financial planner is potentially influenced by their compensation. As such, I suggest seeking financial planning advice from people who provide their services either at no charge to you or for a fixed fee.

How Do I Find the Financial Planner that is Best for Me?

One of the best ways to identify possible financial planners is to get recommendations from other financial professionals with whom you already have a relationship, such as an accountant or attorney. If you have friends who are particularly financially savvy, you might ask them for a recommendation. However, you are probably at least as skilled at selecting a financial planner as any friends who are in the same boat as you. And, you are a better judge of a good fit for you than anyone else. Also, I strongly recommend against using a family member as a financial planner. There are almost always too many emotions tied up in family relationships for a family member to be able to advise you on a subject that often requires difficult conversations, such as your finances.

Check their Qualifications

Once you have identified one or more possible financial planners, you’ll want to check their qualifications and whether they have been disciplined. In the US, the most common designation attained by professional financial planners is a Certified Financial Planner, though there are many other designations that indicate expertise, such as a Certified Financial Analyst or a Certified Public Accountant (CPA).

Once you’ve identified the candidates’ professional designations, you’ll want to check to see if there has been any disciplinary action against them. Disciplinary actions are all available on-line. Graeme’s words of wisdom are, “I don’t care how minor the infraction. I wouldn’t go near anyone who has been disciplined. It’s not hard to be an honest advisor, and I wouldn’t trust anyone who has failed at that.”

Interview a Few Financial Planners

You then want to interview the remaining candidates. Again, I’ll provide Graeme’s advice, as I think it is right on target.

  • Are they generous with their time?
  • Do they listen to you?
  • Do they listen to your spouse?
  • Are they genuinely curious about your situation and your plans and goals?
  • Do they ask questions?
  • Or, are they too quick to sell you something?

Your Final Selection

Look for a combination of training and experience. A financial planning designation should be a minimum, along with several years in the industry. They should also be able to refer you to current clients who can recommend their services.”

I suggest that you also think about whether you feel you can develop a good, long-term relationship with the potential advisor.  Also, consider whether they garnered your respect during the interview. Starting the process of financial planning on a shaky foundation will be unproductive at best.

[1] Graeme Hughes is an accredited Financial Planner with 23 years of experience in the financial services industry. During the course of his career he completed hundreds of financial plans and recommended and sold hundreds of millions of dollars of investment products.

A Man is Not a (Sound Financial) Plan

A man is not a plan

“A Man is Not a Plan!” It sounds like a very dated statement, but a guide on a recent trip I took told me about a conversation he had with one of his nieces about her finances.  They were talking about how she could improve her financial situation by building a sound financial plan. As they were talking, one of them came up with the slogan, “A Man is Not a Plan.” He suggested I use it as the title for one of my posts. So, here it is!

In this post, I will talk about the key components of a sound financial plan. A financial plan provides the structure to help you organize your financial information and decisions. I’ll provide brief explanations of the things to consider about each component, what you need to do and, for most of them, links to posts I’ve written that provide much more detail. I’ll also provide insights on how to know when you need help and who to contact.

Sound Financial Plan

A sound financial plan includes the following sections:

    • A list of your financial goals – In this section, you’ll want to identify your three to five most important financial goals.
    • A list of your current assets and liabilities (debts)
    • Your budget
    • Your savings and investment strategies to help you attain your goals, including
      • Short-term savings
      • Designated savings
      • Retirement savings
    • Desired use of debt, including re-payment of current debt
    • Your giving goals
    • Risk management strategy, i.e., types and amounts of insurance to buy
    • Understanding of your income tax situation
    • What you want to have happen to you and your assets when you become incapacitated or die and related documents

     

  • You will likely be most successful if you create a formal document with all of these components of a sound financial plan. You’ll want to review and update your financial plan at least every few years, but certainly any time you have a significant change in your finances (e.g., a significant change in wages) or are considering a significant financial decision (e.g., buying a house, getting married or having children). Of course, a less formal format is much better than no plan at all, so you should tailor your efforts to what will best help you attain your financial goals.

    Budget

    A budget itemizes all of your sources of income and all of your expenses, including money you set aside for different types of savings. It provides the framework for all of your financial decisions. Do you need to change the balance between income and expenses to meet your goals? Can you make a big expenditure? How and what types of insurance can you afford? How much debt can you afford to re-pay?

    I think that a budget is the most important component of a sound financial plan and should be the first step you take. Everyone should have a good understanding of the amounts of their income and expenses to inform the rest of their financial decisions.  While some people will benefit from going through the full process of creating a budget and monitoring it, others can be a bit less detailed.

    In the text section of your financial plan, you’ll want to include a list of your financial goals as they relate to your budget and how you plan to implement them. You can include your actual budget in your financial plan itself or as a separate attachment.

    Savings

    I generally think of savings in three categories (four if you include setting aside money for your kids): emergency savings, designated savings and retirement savings. You will want to address each of these types of savings in your financial plan. The information you’ll want to include for each type of savings is:

    • How much you currently have saved.
    • The target amounts you’d like to have saved.
    • Your plan for meeting your targets.
    • For what you’ll use it.
    • How fast you’ll replenish it if you use it.
    • How much you need to include in your budget to meet your targets.
    • Your investing strategy.
    • A list of all financial accounts with location of securely stored access information.

    Emergency Savings

    Emergency savings is money you set aside for unexpected events. These events can include increased expenses such as the need to travel to visit an ailing relative or attend a funeral or a major repair to your residence. They also include unexpected decreases in income, such as the reduced hours, leaves of absence or lay-offs related to the coronavirus.

    The general rule of thumb is that a target amount for emergency savings is three to six months of expenses. I suggest keeping one month of expenses readily available in a checking or savings account that you can access immediately and the rest is an account you can access in a day or two, such as a money market account.

    Designated Savings

    Designated savings is money you set aside for planned large expenses or bills you don’t pay every month. Examples might include your car insurance if you pay it annually or semi-annually or money you save for a replacement for your car you are going to buy in a few years.

    To estimate how much you need to set aside for your designated savings each month, you’ll want to look at all costs that you don’t pay every month and figure out how often you pay them. You’ll want to set aside enough money each month to cover those bills when they come due. For example, if your car insurance bill is $1,200 every six months, you’ll want to put $200 in your designated savings in each month in which your insurance bill isn’t paid. You’ll then take $1,000 our of your designated savings and add $200 in each month it is due to pay the bill.

    Retirement Savings

    Saving for retirement is one of the largest expenses you’ll have during your working lifetime. There are many aspects of saving for retirement:

    • Understanding how much you will receive in retirement from government programs, such as Social Security in the US or the Canadian Pension Plan in Canada.
    • Setting your retirement savings goal.
    • Estimating how much you need to save each year to meet your retirement savings goal.
    • Deciding what are the best types of accounts in which to put your retirement savings – taxable, Roth (TFSA in Canada) or Traditional (RRSP in Canada).
    • Determining in what assets (bonds, stocks, mutual funds or ETFs, for example) to invest your retirement savings in light of your risk tolerance and diversification needs and how those choices affect your investment returns.

    Debt

    Debt can be used for any number of purchases, ranging from smaller items bought on credit cards to large items purchased with a loan, such as a home. Whether you have debt outstanding today, use credit cards regularly and/or are thinking of making a large purchase using debt, you’ll want to define your goals with respect to the use of debt.

    For example, do you want to never have any debt outstanding (i.e., never buy anything for which you can’t pay cash and pay your credit card bills in full every month)? Are you willing to take out a mortgage as long as you understand the terms and can afford the payments? Do you have a combination of a high enough income and small enough savings that you are willing to use debt to make large purchases other than your home? Do you have debts you want to pay off in a certain period of time?

    As you think about these questions, you’ll want to consider what debt is good for you and what debt might be problematic.  A sound financial plan includes a list of your debts, how much you owe for each one, your target for repaying them, and your strategy for using debt in the future.

    Credit Cards

    Credit cards are the most common form of debt. Your financial plan might include the number of credit cards you want to have and your goals for paying your credit card bills. As part of these goals, you might need to add a goal about spending, such as not buying anything you can’t afford to pay off in a certain period of time.

    Student Loans

    Many people have student loans with outstanding balances. In your financial plan, you’ll want to include your goal for paying off any student loans you have. Do you want to pay them off according to the original schedule? Are you behind on payments and have a goal for getting caught up? Do you want to pay off your student loans early?

    Car Loans

    In a perfect world, your car would last long enough that you could buy its replacement out of your designated savings. However, the world isn’t perfect and you may need to consider whether to take out a loan or lease a car. Your financial plan will include your strategy for ensuring that you always have a vehicle to drive. How often do you want to replace your car? What is your goal with respect to saving for the car, loans or leases? How much will it cost to maintain and repair your car?   Your budget will include the amounts needed to cover the up-front portion of the cost of a replacement car, any loan or lease payments and amounts to put in designated savings for maintenance and repairs.

    Mortgages

    Most homeowners borrow money to help pay for it As part of creating your financial plan, you might include your goal for home ownership. Are you happy as a renter for the foreseeable future or would you like to buy a house?

    If you want to buy a house either for the first time or a replacement for one you own, you then need to figure out how to pay for the house. How much can you save for a down payment? Can you set aside enough in designated savings each month to reach that goal? What is the price of a house that you can afford, after considering property taxes, insurance, repairs and maintenance?

    Once you have a mortgage, you’ll want to select a goal for paying it off. When a mortgage has a low enough interest rate, you might make the payments according to the loan agreement and no more. If it has a higher interest rate or you foresee that your ability to make mortgage payments might change before it is fully re-paid, you might want to make extra payments if you have money in your budget.

    Paying Off Debt

    If you have debt, you’ll want to include your goals and your strategy for paying it off in your financial plan. You’ll first want to figure out how much you can afford each month to use for paying off your debts. You can then compare that amount with the amount needed to meet your goals. If the former is less than the latter, you’ll need to either generate more income, reduce other expenses, put less money in savings or be willing to live with less aggressive goals. These decisions are challenging ones and are a combination of cost/benefit analyses and personal preference.

Giving Goals

Many people want to give to their community either by volunteering their time or donating money.  If you plan to give money or assets, you’ll first want to make sure that you can afford the donations by checking your budget and other financial goals.  It is also important to make sure that your donations are getting used in the way you intended, as not all charities are the same.  A Dime Saved provides many more insights about giving in her Guide to Giving to Charity.

  • Insurance

    Protecting your assets through insurance is an important part of a sound financial plan. The most common types of insurance for individuals cover your vehicles, residence, personal liability, health and life. There are other types of insurance, such as disability, dental, vision, and accidental death & dismemberment, that are most often purchased through your employer but can also be purchased individually.

    As I told my kids, my recommendation is that you buy the highest limits on your insurance that you can afford and don’t buy insurance for things you can afford to lose. For example, if you can afford to pay up to $5,000 every time your home is damaged, you might select a $5,000 deductible on your homeowners policy. Alternately, if you can afford to replace your car if it is destroyed in an accident, you might not buy collision coverage at all. Otherwise, you might set lower deductibles as your goal.

    For each asset in your financial plan, including your life and health which can be considered future sources of income or services, you’ll want to select a strategy for managing the risks of damage to those assets or of liability as a result of having those assets.

    A financial plan includes a list of the types of policies you purchase, the specifics of the coverage provided and insurer, changes you’d like to make to your coverage and your strategy for insurance in the future. You’ll also want to attach copies of either just the declaration pages or your entire policies to your financial plan.

    Car Insurance

    Car insurance can provide coverage for damage to your car, to other vehicles involved in an accident you cause and injuries to anyone involved in an accident. The types of coverages available depend on the jurisdiction in which you live, as some jurisdictions rely on no-fault for determining who has to pay while others rely solely on tort liability.

    Homeowners Insurance

    Homeowners insurance (including renters or condo-owners insurance) provides coverage for damage to your residence (if you own it), damage to your belongings and many injuries to people visiting your residence.

    Umbrella Insurance

    One way to increase the limits of liability on your car and homeowners insurance is an umbrella insurance policy. An umbrella also provides protection against several other sources of personal liability. If you have money in your budget for additional insurance, you might consider purchasing an umbrella policy.

    Health Insurance

    Health insurance is likely to be one of your most expensive purchases, unless your employer pays a significant portion of the cost. Whether you are buying in the open market or through your employer, you are likely to have choices of health insurance plan. Selecting the health insurance plan that best meets your budget and goals can be challenging.

    Life Insurance

    There are many types of life insurance, including term and whole life. Some variations of whole life insurance provide you with options for investing in addition to the death benefit. Once you have compiled the other components of your financial plan, you’ll be better able to assess your need for life insurance. If you have no dependents and no debt, you might not need any. At the other extreme, if you have a lot of debt and one or more dependents, you might want to buy as much coverage as you can afford to ease their financial burden if you die. To learn more specifics about buying life insurance, you might review this post.

    Income Taxes

    Some of your financial decisions will depend on your income tax situation.

    • Do you want your investments to produce a lot of cash income which can increase your current income taxes or focus on appreciation which will usually defer your taxes until a later date?
    • Is a Roth (TFSA) or Traditional (RRSP) plan a better choice for your retirement savings?
    • Are you having too little or too much income taxes withheld from your paycheck?
    • Do you need to pay estimated income taxes?
    • How will buying a house, getting married or having children affect your income taxes?
    • Will moving to another state increase or reduce your income taxes?

     

  • As you consider these and other questions, you’ll want to outline at least a basic understanding of how Federal and local income taxes impact your different sources of income as part of creating a sound financial plan.

    Legal Documents

    Although it is hard to imagine when you are young, at some point in your life you may become incapacitated and will eventually die. There are a number of documents that you can use to ensure that your medical care and assets are managed according to your wishes. You can either include these documents as part of your financial plan or create a list of the documents, the date of the most recent version of each one and where they are located.

    Powers of Attorney

    There are two important types of powers of attorney – medical and financial.

  • A medical power of attorney appoints someone to be responsible for making your medical decisions if you are physically or mentally incapable of doing so. You can supplement a medical power of attorney with a medical directive that is presented to medical personnel before major surgery or by the person appointed to make medical decisions that dictates specifically what is to happen in certain situations.A financial power of attorney appoints someone to be responsible for your finances if you are physically or mentally incapacitated. The financial power of attorney can allow that person to do only a limited number of things, such as pay your bills, or can allow that person to do anything related to your finances.

    Trusts

    There are several forms of trusts that can be used to hold some or all of your assets to make the transition to your beneficiaries easier when you die. Trusts can also be used to hold money for your children either before or after you die. While I am familiar with some types of trusts, I don’t know enough to provide any guidance about them. If you are interested in them, I suggest you research them on line and/or contact a lawyer with expertise in trusts.

    Your Will

    If you die without a will, your state or provincial government will decide how your assets will be divided. In many jurisdictions, your spouse, if you have one, will get some or all of your assets. Your children or parents may also get some of your assets. Most people want more control over the disposition of their assets than is provided by the government.

  • A will is the legal document that allows you to make those specifications. Your will can also identify who will become legally responsible for your minor children or any adult children who are unable to take care of themselves. That responsibility can be split between responsibility for raising your children and responsibility for overseeing any money you leave either to their guardian(s) or for them.

    How to Know When You Need Help

    As you can see, there are a lot of components to a sound financial plan and many of them are interrelated. There are many resources available to help you develop and refine your plan. Many of those resources are free, such as the links to the articles I’ve published on relevant topics. There are also many other sources of information, including personal stories, on line.

    You can also get more personalized assistance. There are many types of financial advisors, a topic I’ll cover in a post soon. Many financial advisors provide a broad array of services, while others specialize in one or two aspects of your financial plan.

    Sources of Advice

    The table below lists the types of obstacles you might be facing and the types of advisors that might be able to help.

    ObstaclePossible Advisors
    I can’t figure out how to make a budget or how to set aside money for emergency or designated savings.Bookkeeper, accountant, financial planner
    I can’t make my budget balance.Bookkeeper, accountant, financial planner
    I have more debt that I can re-pay.Financial planner, debt counselor, debt consolidator
    I don’t know what insurance I should buy.Financial planner, insurance agent or, for employer-sponsored health insurance, your employer’s human resource department
    I’m not sure I’m saving enough for retirement.Financial planner
    I have questions about how to invest my savings, including whether I am diversified or need to re-balance my portfolio.Financial planner or stock broker
    I don’t understand how income taxes work.Accountant
    I need help with a Trust, Power of Attorney or Will.Wills & estates lawyer

    Clearly, a financial planner can help with many of these questions, but sometimes you’ll need an advisor with more in depth expertise on one aspect of your financial plan.

Your Bills: Pay Them or Defer Them?

Your-Bills-Pay-Them--or-Defer-Them

Many of you are facing difficult financial decisions as your hours are reduced, you have to take an unpaid leave of absence or you are laid off. At the same time, some creditors are offering to help you by waiving or deferring payments. In this post, I’ll provide my thoughts on how you might decide whether to pay or defer your bills.

Key Takeaways: Pay or Defer Your Bills

Here are the key takeaways about whether to pay or defer your bills.

  • If a creditor is willing to waive some or all of your debt, accept the offer.
  • When creditors are willing to defer payments without any extra charges, accepting that offer, rather than paying from your emergency savings, is likely to make sense for most people. The same holds true when the extra interest or late fees are small.
  • The only situations in which dipping into your emergency savings is preferable for most people are those in which the fees or extra interest are expensive.
  • If you are unable to make your payments on time, whether they are from your income or emergency savings, it is very important to contact your creditors. If you do, you are less likely to incur fees and it is less likely that there will be an adverse impact on your credit score.

What are Debtholders Offering?

Before deciding whether to pay or defer your bills, you’ll want to make sure you understand what is being offered. There are generally three types of offers made by creditors:

  • Eliminate some or all of your debt.
  • Defer payments without extra interest or fees.
  • Defer payments with extra interest or fees.

I explain and provide examples of each of these three options.

Waive Some Payments or Forgive Debt

Under this option, the creditor forgives some or all of your debt. Debt can be forgiven by waiving (eliminating) some of your payments or reducing each of your payments. If all of your debt is forgiven, you will not need to make any more payments.

Clearly, you will want to accept offers from any creditors that are willing to forgive some or all of your debt. If only a portion of the debt is forgiven, you’ll want to make sure that you understand how that portion will be reflected in your payments.

  • Will you have to continue making payments as in the past, but with fewer payments?
  • Are you able to stop making payments for a certain period of time?
  • Will you have to continue making payments as in the past, but with a smaller amount?

As an example, I have seen several proposals from US Senate Democrats ranging from wiping out all education debt to cancelling between $10,000 and $50,000 per borrower of Federal student loans (but not private student loans). One description of the latter indicates that the $10,000 of forgiveness would be accomplished by having the Department of Education make monthly payments on behalf of borrowers during the course of the “emergency.” Under this proposal, you would be able to stop making payment for a certain period of time and then would continue making payments in the future as if you had been making your payments instead of the Department of Education.

Defer Payments without Interest or Fees

Under this option, you take a break from making payments. At the same time, the creditor does not charge you any fees and no interest accrues on your outstanding balance. Once the break is over, you will make the same number and amounts of payments as you would have without the break, but they will extend further into the future. That is, your payment scheduled will be shifted by the length of the break.

On March 20, 2020, US President Trump announced that this approach would apply to Federal student loan payments. Federal student loan debtors will not have to make any payments for 60 days and no interest will accrue. If you have a US Federal student loan, you should research the details of this mandate, as debtors whose student loan payments are not currently in arrears will need to apply to get their payments suspended.

Income taxes for 2019 are another example of payments that can be deferred without interest or fees as the result of the coronavirus upheaval. In the US, the Federal government and many states have extended the deadlines for filing and paying 2019 income taxes until July 15, 2020.

Defer Payments with Interest or Fees

Under this approach, the creditor allows you to take a break from making payments, but will charge you one or both of interest during the break and additional fees. Once the break is over, you will not only make the number and amounts of payments you would have without the break, but you will have to pay the additional interest and/or fees.

If you select this option, you’ll need to understand when these additional amounts will be due.

  • Will they be due immediately at the end of the break?
  • Are the extra amounts added to each payment ?
  • Will you have to make more payments?

Utility Example

An example of this option is the Enmax Relief Program. Enmax is the power utility company in Alberta. It has indicated that it will allow customers to set up payment arrangements for overdue bills, but only if current monthly charges continue to be paid. It appears (though isn’t 100% clear) that customers who miss any payments, even customers with payment plans, will need to pay late charges.

Mortgages

According to an article in Forbes, many mortgage companies are also offering flexibility. Some Federal and state mortgage programs are halting foreclosures, but aren’t necessarily waiving or deferring payments. More importantly, some private mortgage companies are allowing payments to be deferred. Not all of these companies have been clear about how interest or late fees will be treated during this period. As such, if you need to defer some mortgage payments, it is important that you get the details specific to your lender and loan.

The Forbes article contains a bit more detail from Ally. It will allow mortgage payments to be deferred for 120 days with no late fees, but interest will accrue. As such, the total amount you will pay for your mortgage will increase by an amount slightly more than your annual interest rate divided by 12 times the number of months you defer your payments times your outstanding principal at the time you started deferring your payments. The “slightly more” in the previous sentence refers to the fact that the interest will compound over the deferral period, so you’ll have to pay interest not only on the outstanding principal but also on the interest that has accumulated since you made your most recent payment.

Deciding What to Do

Once you’ve understood the options available from your creditors, you’ll want to make informed decisions about whether to pay or defer your bills. In this section, I will illustrate the analysis you can do to help support your decision.

In this illustration, you have $20,000 of emergency savings. You have a debt with $50,000 of outstanding principal, 10 years remaining on the term and a 5% interest rate.   This combination of characteristics leads to a monthly payment of $530. Although the illustration looks at payment of a debt, it is equivalent to a monthly bill of the same amount. You are able to resume your regular payments at the end of three months.

When looking at the option to take the payment out of your emergency savings, I assume that you plan to replace that money within a year. I also assume that your emergency savings is in a checking, savings or money market account that is currently paying such a low interest rate that it can be ignored.

Waive Some Payments or Forgive Debt

No analysis is needed for the option under which a creditor offers to waive some of your payments or forgive your debt completely (without any additional costs on your part). You will always be better off if you accept the offer.

Deferring Payments without Interest

For this illustration, you defer three months of payments without interest. You re-stock your emergency savings within a year.

Take Out of Emergency Savings

The table below shows the cash flows and balances if you pay the three months of payments from your emergency savings.

Take Out of Emergency Savings/No InterestTodayIn 3 MonthsIn 12 MonthsWhen Debt is Paid in 5 Years
Amount Paid to Creditor from Savings$0$1,590$0$0
Amount Paid to Creditor from Income004,77057,240
Contributions to Savings from Income001,5900
Emergency Savings20,00018,41020,00020,000
Principal50,00049,03046,0460

In the first row, you see the three months of payments, totaling $1,590, that you pay the creditor from your emergency savings. The second row shows the payments you make from your income after the initial three-month period. The amounts you put in your emergency savings to bring it to the pre-crisis level are shown in the third row.

The last two rows show the ending balances for your emergency savings and the outstanding principal on your debt. At 3 months, you can see that your emergency savings has been reduced by $1,590. It returns to its original level after 12 months. Your principal declines to $0 in five years as anticipated under the original schedule, as you have made all payments as planned.

Defer Payments

The table below shows the cash flows and balances if you defer three months of payments.

Defer Payments/No InterestTodayIn 3 MonthsIn 12 MonthsWhen Debt is Paid in 5 Years, 3 Months
Amount Paid to Creditor from Savings$0$0$0$0
Amount Paid to Creditor from Income004,77058,830
Contributions to Savings from Income0000
Emergency Savings20,00020,00020,00020,000
Principal50,00050,00047,0530

In the first and third rows, you see that there are no payments to or from your emergency savings. The second row shows the payments you make from your income after the three-month deferral period. The total of these payments is the same as the total payments from your emergency savings and income (first and second rows) under the Take Out of Emergency Savings Strategy. The difference is that the $1,590 paid from your savings in the Take Out of Emergency Savings Strategy in the first three months is added to the amount paid from your income in the last column of the Defer Payments Strategy. In addition, the header on the last column shows that your payments are extended for three months to 5 years, 3 months instead of 5 years.

The last two rows show the ending balances for your emergency savings and principal. Your emergency savings stays constant at $20,000. Your principal doesn’t decrease in the first three months when you defer your payments. After that, your principal declines to $0 in five years and three months. It is higher at 12 months than under the Take Out of Emergency Savings Strategy because you deferred three months of payments.

How I’d Make the Decision to Pay or Defer Bills

When the creditor won’t charge you extra interest or fees, the choice between whether to pay or defer your bills is one of personal preference. It depends not only on your current and anticipated future financial situations, but also any increase in your level of comfort by having more money in your emergency savings. The creditor isn’t increasing the amount you owe. As such, the financial inputs to the decision relate to the timing with which you make the payments to the creditor.

I would probably defer the payments unless I were expecting difficulty in making the extra three months of payments at the end of the loan term (because I was planning to retire in exactly five years and don’t want to change that goal, for example). I’d rather have the extra money in my emergency savings in case something else happens.

Defer Payments with Interest

For this illustration, you defer three months of payments at the loan’s interest rate with no late fees. If you tap your emergency savings, you re-stock them within a year.

Take Out of Emergency Savings

The transactions are the same under the “Take Out of Emergency Savings” Strategy regardless of whether the creditor charges interest on the deferred payments. I’ve shown the table again so it will be easier to compare it to the “Defer Payments” Strategy under this scenario.

Take Out of Emergency Savings/Wit InterestTodayIn 3 MonthsIn 12 MonthsWhen Debt is Paid in 5 Years
Amount Paid to Creditor from Savings$0$1,590$0$0
Amount Paid to Creditor from Income004,77057,240
Contributions to Savings from Income001,5900
Emergency Savings20,00018,41020,00020,000
Principal50,00049,03046,0460

 

Defer Payments

The table below shows the cash flows and balances if you defer the three months of payments during your time of reduced or no income.

Defer Payments/With InterestTodayIn 3 MonthsIn 12 MonthsWhen Debt is Paid in 5 Years, 3 Months
Amount Paid to Creditor from Savings$0$0$0$0
Amount Paid to Creditor from Income004,83359,607
Contributions to Savings from Income0000
Emergency Savings20,00020,00020,00020,000
Principal50,00050,62847,6440

In the first and third rows, you see no payments to or from your emergency savings. The second row shows the payments you make from your income after the three-month deferral period. For this illustration, the extra interest is added to each payment, increasing it from $530 to $537 a month and your payments extend for an extra three months (see header in last column). As a result, the total of the amounts paid the to creditor are $840 higher than if no interest had been charged.

The last two rows show the ending balances for your emergency savings and principal. Your emergency savings stays constant at $20,000. Your principal increases in the first three months as the additional interest is added during the deferral period. After that, your principal declines to $0 in five years and three months. It is higher at 12 months than under the Take Out of Emergency Savings Strategy because (a) you deferred three months of payments and (b) additional interest accrued.

How I’d Decide

From a financial perspective, you will be better off in this scenario if you make your payments out of your emergency savings because you will avoid paying interest or late fees. You also will have paid off your debt sooner – in five years instead of five years and three months.

Low Interest Rates

If the interest rate on your loan isn’t very high, say less than 6% a year, the additional payments may be relatively small. For example, at a 6% interest rate, the extra accumulated interest on a $200,000 loan with 10 years of payments left (such as our mortgage) is about $3,000. That may sound like a large number, but it adds only $34 to each payment.

Credit Cards

Some people are suggesting that you should make only the minimum payments on your credit cards as a way to keep as much cash in your emergency savings as possible. To date, I haven’t seen any credit card companies that are deferring interest or fees if you don’t pay your credit card in full. Credit card interest rates are generally quite high, often in excess of 10% per year, and many credit card companies charge fees if you don’t pay your balance in full. While many debts have interest rates that are low enough to justify deferring payments, most credit cards do not fall in that category. As such, I would pay off as much of my high-interest credit card balances as I could afford, even it if meant dipping into my emergency savings.

Personal Decision

Here is where the decision to pay or defer your bills becomes more personal. There is an emotional benefit to leaving the money in your emergency savings in case something else happens or your reduction in income lasts longer than you expect. You’ll need to weight that increased comfort level with the additional cost of deferring the payments under this scenario. For many people, the $34 a month increase in their mortgage payment in my illustration is a small cost to pay for the additional comfort. For other people, particularly those whose budgets are already very tight or who have a fixed amount of time until they retire, the increased payments and lengthening of the term of the loan are too expensive. As such, you’ll need to decide for yourself whether to pay or defer your bills, but now you’ll be able to make an informed decision.

Impact on Credit Rating

Another consideration in deciding whether to pay or defer your bills is your credit score. If you miss payments, there could be an adverse impact on your credit score, as timely payment is one of the important factors that drive your score. To be clear, if you make your payments from your emergency savings, there will be no adverse impact on your credit score. If you are not able to make your payments, even from your emergency savings, it is important that you communicate with your creditors and agree to a plan.

What Experian Says

I contacted Experian by e-mail and received the following quote from Rob Griffin, senior director of consumer education and awareness.

If you think you may have trouble making any of your monthly payments, contact your lender or creditor as soon as possible – try not to wait until you’ve missed your payment due date. Lenders may have several options for helping you cope with a variety of COVID-19-related financial hardships including placing your accounts in forbearance or deferment for a period of time. This means effectively suspending your payments until the crisis has passed and can help minimize the impact to the credit score if the account is in good standing and hasn’t had previous delinquencies reported.

While reported in forbearance or deferment, your accounts will have no negative affect on the most common credit scores from FICO and VantageScore. Keep in mind, lenders do not want you to fall behind on your payments any more than you do. Contacting your lenders early can help you protect your financial health in the long run.[1]

Other Credit Bureaus

I found similar statements on the web sites of the other two major credit bureaus, Equifax and Transunion.

How it Impacts You

These statements indicate that you may be able to avoid a deterioration in your credit score if you are proactive with your lenders about skipping or deferring payments.

 

[1] E-mail from Amanda Garofalo, PR Specialist, Experian, March 19, 2020.

Don’t Panic! Just Plan It.

Don't Panic. Just Plan it.

Financial markets have been more turbulent in the past few weeks than has been seen in many years, probably more volatile than has happened since many of you started being financially aware. You may be wondering what actions you should take. With the sense of panic and urgency surrounding recent news, it often feels as if drastic action is necessary. If you have created financial plan, inaction may be the best strategy for you!

As indicated elsewhere on this blog, I do not have any professional designations that qualify me to provide professional advice. In addition, my comments are provided as generalities and may not apply to your specific situation. Please read the rest of this post with these thoughts in mind.

Biggest Financial Risk from Recent News

I suspect that losing your job or losing business if you are self-employed is the biggest financial risk many of you face. Understanding your position within your company and how your company will be impacted by coronavirus, oil prices and other events will inform you as to the extent to which you face the risk of a lay-off or reduction in hours/salary.

If you think you might have a risk of a decrease in earned income, you’ll want to look into what options for income replacement are available to you, including state or federal unemployment programs, severance from your employers, among others. Another important step is to review your expenses so you know how you can reduce them to match your lowered income.  In addition, you’ll want to evaluate how long you can live before exhausting your emergency savings, with or without drastic reductions in your expenses. You may even want to start cutting expenses before your income is lowered and put the extra amount in your emergency savings.

Your Financial Plan & Recent News

In the rest of this post, I’ll look at the various components of a financial plan and provide my thoughts on how they might be impacted by the recent news and resulting volatility in financial markets. For more tips on how to handle financial turmoil, check out these mistakes to avoid.

Paid Time-Off Benefits/Disability Insurance

If you are unfortunate enough to get COVID-19 or are required to self-quarantine and can’t work from home, you may face a reduction in compensation. Your first line of defense is any sick time or paid time-off (PTO) provided by your employer. In most cases, your employer will cover 100% of your wages for up to the number of days, assuming you haven’t used them yet.

Once you have used all of your sick time/PTO, you may have coverage under short- or long-term disability insurance if provided by your employer or if you purchase it through your employer or on your own. Disability insurance generally pays between 2/3 and 100% of your wages while you are unable to work for certain causes, almost always including illness. It might be a good time to review your available sick time/PTO and disability insurance to understand what coverage you have.

Emergency Savings

Emergency savings is one of the most important components of a financial plan.  There are two aspects to your emergency savings that you’ll want to consider. The first is whether you have enough in your emergency savings.  The second is the risk that the value of the savings will go down due to financial market issues.

Do I Have Enough?

If you are laid off, have reduced hours or use up all, exhaust your sick time/PTO or get less than 100% of your wages replaced by disability insurance, you may have to tap into your emergency savings. The need to spend your emergency savings increases if you tend to spend most of your paycheck rather than divert a portion of it to savings.

I generally suggest one to six months of expenses as a target for the amount of emergency savings. In light of recent events and the increased risks lay-off and illness, I would focus on the higher end of that range or even longer. As you evaluate the likelihood you’ll be laid off, the chances you’ll be exposed to coronavirus and your propensity to get it, you’ll also want to consider whether you have enough in emergency savings to cover your expenses while your income is reduced or eliminated.

In certain situations, such as in response to the coronavirus, creditors will allow you to defer your payments.  You will then have the option as to whether to defer them or make those payments from your emergency savings./a>

Will it Lose Its Value?

I’ve suggested that you keep at least one month of expenses in emergency savings in a checking or savings account at a bank or similar financial institution. The monetary value of your emergency savings is pretty much risk-free, at least in the US. The only way you would lose any of these savings is if the financial institution were to go bankrupt. In the US, deposits in financial institutions are insured, generally up to $250,000 per person per financial institution, by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). For more specifics, see the FDIC web site. Similar protections may be available in other countries.

I’ve also suggested that you keep another two to five months of expenses in emergency savings in something only slightly less accessible, such as a money market account. There is slightly more risk that the value of a money market account will go down than a checking or savings account, but it is generally considered to be very small. Money market accounts are also insured by the FDIC. For more specifics, see this article on Investopedia.

As such, the recent volatility in financial markets are unlikely to require you to take action related to your existing emergency savings and could act as an opportunity to re-evaluate whether you have enough set aside for emergencies.

Short-Term Savings

Another component of a financial plan is short-term savings.  Short-term savings is money you set aside for a specific purpose. One purpose for short-term savings is expenses that don’t get paid every month, such as property taxes, homeowners insurance or car maintenance and repairs.   Another purpose for short-term savings is to cover the cost of larger purchases for which you might need to save for several years, such as a car or a down payment on a house.

Short-term savings are commonly held in money-market accounts, certificates of deposits (CDs) or very high quality, shorter term bonds, such as those issued by the US government. CDs and US government bonds held to maturity are generally considered to have very little risk. Their market values are unlikely to change much and the likelihood that the issuers will not re-pay the principal when due is small.

Thus, the recent volatility in financial markets is also unlikely to require you to take action related to your short-term savings.

Long-Term Savings

Savings for retirement and other long-term goals are key components of a financial plan.  If they are invested at all in any equity markets, your long-term savings have likely taken quite a beating. Rather than try to provide generic guidance on how to deal with the losses in your long-term savings, I’ll tell you how I’m thinking and what I’m doing about mine. By providing a concrete example, albeit one very different from most of your situations, my goal is to provide you with some valuable insights about the thought process.

Think about the Time Frame for My Long-Term Savings

As you may know, I’m retired and have just a little income from consulting. As such, my financial plan anticipates that I will live primarily off my investments and their returns. I have enough cash and bonds to cover my expenses for several years. As such, I’m not in a position that I absolutely have to liquidate any of my equity positions in less than three-to-four years.

For many of you, your most significant goal for long-term savings is likely retirement. As such, your time horizon for your long-term savings is longer than mine and you can withstand even more volatility. That is, you have a longer time for stock prices to recover to the recent highs and even higher.     In the final section of this post, I’ll talk about how long it has taken equity markets to recover from past “crashes” to help you get more perspective on this issue.

Know Your Investments

My view is that, if I wait long enough, the overall stock market will recover. It always has in the past. If it doesn’t, I suspect something cataclysmic will have happened and I will be focused on more important issues such as food, water and heat, than my long-term savings. For now, though, my view is that my investments in broad-based index funds are going to recover from the recent price drops though it may take a while and be a tough period until then. As such, I am not taking any action with respect to those securities. Once the stock market seems to settle down a bit (and possibly not until it starts going up for a while), I might invest a bit more of my cash to take advantage of the lower prices.

I have a handful of investments in stocks and bonds of individual companies. These positions have required a bit more thought on my part.   I already know the primary products and services of these companies and the key factors that drive profitability, as I identified these features before I purchased the stocks or bonds as part of my financial plan. I can now look at the forces driving the economic changes to evaluate how each of the companies might be impacted.

Example 1

I own some bonds that mature in two to three years in a large company that provides cellular phone service. As discussed in my post on bonds, as long as you hold bonds to maturity, the only risk you face is that the issuer will default (not make interest payments or re-pay the principal). With the reduction in travel and group meetings, I see an increased demand for technological communication solutions, such as cell phones. While the stock price of this company has gone down, I don’t see that its chance of going bankrupt has been affected adversely, so don’t plan to sell the bonds.

Example 2

One company whose stock I’ve owned for a very long time focuses on products used to test food safety. While the company’s stock price has dropped along with the broader market, I anticipate that people will have heightened awareness of all forms of ways of transmitting illness, including through food-borne bacteria and other pathogens. As such, I am not planning to sell this stock as the result of recent events.

Example 3

I own stock in an airline that operates primarily within North America. This one is a bit trickier. It looks like travel of all types is going to be down for a while. I’m sure that US domestic airline travel will be significantly impacted, but suspect it will not be affected as much as international or cruise ship travel. The reduction in revenue might be slightly offset by the lower cost of fuel, but that is probably not a huge benefit in the long term.

I’ve owned this company for so long that I still have a large capital gain and would have to pay tax on it if I sold the stock. At this point, I don’t think there is a high probability that this airline will go bankrupt (though I’m not an expert and could be wrong). I expect the price to drop more than the overall market average in the coming months, but also expect that it will recover. As such, I don’t plan to sell this stock solely because of recent events.   However, if this company had most of its revenue from operating cruise ships, was smaller, or had more foreign exposure, I would study its financials and business model in more detail to see if I thought it would be able to withstand the possibility of much lower demand for an extended period of time.

Summary

I have gone through similar thought processes for each of the companies in my portfolio to create my action plan. I will re-evaluate them as time passes and more information becomes available.

What We Can Learn from Past Crashes

Although every market cycle is different, I thought it might be insightful to provide information about previous market crashes. For this discussion, I am defining a market crash as a decrease in the price of the S&P 500 by more than 20% from its then most recent peak. I have identified 11 crashes using this definition, including the current one, over the time period from 1927 to March 14, 2020.

As you’ll see in the graphs below, the market crash starting at the peak in August 1929 is much different from most of the others. It took until 1956 before the S&P 500 reached its pre-crash level! Over the almost three years until the S&P 500 reached its low and then again during the recovery period (from the low until it reached its previous high), there were several crashes. I have counted this long cycle as a single crash, though it could be separated into several.

Magnitude of Previous Crashes

The table below shows the dates of the highest price of the S&P 500 before each of the 11 crashes since 1927.  It also shows the percentage decrease from the high to the low and the number of years from the high to the low.

Date of Market Peak

Price ChangeYears from High to Low

9/17/29

-86%2.7

8/3/56

-21%

1.2

12/13/61-28%

0.5

2/10/66-22%

0.7

12/2/68

-36%

1.5

1/12/73

-48%1.7

12/1/80

-27%1.7

8/26/87

-34%

0.3

3/27/00-49%

2.5

10/10/07-57%

1.4

2/20/20-27%

0.1

While they don’t happen all that often, this table confirms that the S&P 500 has suffered significant decreases in the past. What seems a bit different about the current crash is the speed at which prices have dropped from the market high reached just a few weeks ago. In the past, the average time from the market peak to the market bottom has been 1.4 years, but the range has been from 0.3 years to 2.7 years. While the 27% decrease in the S&P 500 from its peak on February 20, 2020 until March 14, 2020 is large and troubling, the average price change of 10 preceding crashes is -41% (-36% if the 1929 crash is excluded). As such, it isn’t unprecedented.

What Happened Next?

This table shows how long it took after each of the first 10 crashes for the S&P 500 to return to its previous peak. It also shows the average annualized return from the lowest price until it returned to its previous peak.

Date of Market Peak

Years from Low Back to PeakAnnualized Average Return During Recovery

9/17/29

22.29.3%

8/3/56

0.929.8%
12/13/611.2

31.7%

2/10/660.6

55.3%

12/2/681.8

28.3%

1/12/73

5.812.0%

12/1/80

0.2293.4%

8/26/87

1.6

28.1%

3/27/004.6

15.7%

10/10/074.1

22.9%

For example, it took 1.6 years after the market low price on December 4, 1987 (the low point of the cycle starting on August 26, 1987) for the S&P 500 to reach the same price it had on August 26, 1987. Over that 1.6-year period, the average annual return on an investment in the S&P 500 would have been 28%!

Because the values from the 1929 and 1980 cycles can distort the averages, I’ll look at the median values of these metrics. At the median, it took 1.7 years for the S&P 500 to reach its previous high with a median annualized average return of 28%.   There are obviously wide ranges about these metrics, but, excluding the 1929 crash, the S&P 500 never took more than 6 years to recover from its low. This time frame is important as you are thinking about the length of time until you might need to use your long-term savings.

After hitting bottom, the S&P 500 always had an average annual return of 12% or more over the recovery period, a fair amount higher than the overall annual average return on the S&P 500. Anyone who sold a position in the S&P 500 at any of the low points missed the opportunity to earn these higher-than-average returns – a reminder to not panic.

From Crash to Recovery

The graph below shows the ratios of the price of the S&P 500 to the price at the peak (day 0) over the 30 years after each of the first 10 market peaks in the tables above.

The light blue line that stays at the bottom is the 1929 crash. As you can see, by 30 years later, the S&P 500 was only twice as high as it was at its pre-crash peak. For all of the other crashes, the S&P 500 was at least four times higher than at each pre-crash peak, even though in many cases there were subsequent crashes in the 30-year period.

To get a sense for how the current crash compares, the graph below shows the same information for only the first 100 days after each peak. The current crash is represented by the heavy red line.

As indicated above, one of the unique characteristics about the current crash is that it occurred so quickly after the peak. The graph shows that the bright red line is much lower than any of the other lines on day 17. However, if you look at the light blue line (after the peak on September 17, 1929) and the brown line (after the peak on August 26, 1987), you can see that there were similarly rapid price decreases as occurred in the current crash, but they started a bit longer after their respective peaks.

Current Crash

We can’t know the path that the stock market will take going forward in the current cycle. It could halt its downward trend in a few days to a week and return to set new highs later this year. On the other hand, if other events occur in the future (such as the weather conditions that led to the dust bowl in the 1930s and World War II in the 1940s that exacerbated the banking issues that triggered the 1929 crash), it is possible stock prices could decline for many years and take a long time to recovery. Based on the patterns observed, this trend is less likely, but it is still a possibility.

As such, it is important as you consider your situation that you look at your investment horizon, your ability to live with further decreases in stock prices and your willingness to forego the opportunity to earn higher-than-average returns when the stock market returns to its pre-crash levels if you sell now, among other things.

Closing Thoughts

My goal in writing this post was to provide you with insights on how to view the disruptions in the economy and financial markets in recent weeks and plan your responses to them. My primary messages are:

  1. Don’t panic. While significant action may be the best course for your situation, do your best to make well-reasoned and not emotional decisions. Although you might want to sell your investments right away to avoid additional decreases in value, it isn’t the best strategy for everyone.
  2. Stick with (or make) a financial plan. Having a financial plan provides you with the ability to look at the impact of the uncertainties in financial markets and the overall economy on each aspect of your financial future separately, making the decision-making process a little easier.

 

How to Raise Financially Smart Kids

I recently wrote a guest post for Grokking Money about how to raise financially smart kids.  Here is the start of it, to read the entire post, click here.

Instilling your children with good financial habits will increase their likelihood of success, just as is the case with many other types of habits.  In this post, I’ll provide you with eight things you can do to help your kids become financially smart.  All but one of these ideas are based on my experiences growing up or those I provided for my children.

1. Open a Bank Account

We opened savings accounts for our children with the money they received when they were born.  As they got older (probably around 5), we made them aware of . . . Read More

Good Debt vs Bad Debt: Key Characteristics

Not all debt is bad! The specific definitions of good debt vs bad debt will vary from person to person. For people who plan to retire very early and live on a limited income or for people who know that they have a hard time paying their bills either for lack of money or organization skills, most debt is likely to be problematic.  For other people, taking on debt is less of an issue.

One of my followers was thinking of expanding his business and was concerned that taking on debt would be harmful. As part of helping him with his thinking, I identified general characteristics that distinguish good debt vs bad debt. He ended up selling his business instead of expanding it, but I am sharing my insights in this post. These characteristics may not apply to your particular situation, so be sure to think about them in the context of your own situation and temperament.

Characteristics of Bad Debt

Here are five characteristics of debts that I would consider bad.

You Don’t Understand the Terms

Loans and other sources of borrowing, such as credit cards, all have different terms. It is important that you understand the terms of your debt. For example, some loans, mortgages in particular, have adjustable rates. That is, the interest rate that you pay on your loan will change as a benchmark interest rate changes. If the benchmark interest rate increases, your loan payments will also increase.

Credit cards also can have interest rates that change. A teaser rate is an interest rate that applies to credit card debt for the first several months to a year. After that initial period, the interest rate charged on credit card debt can be very high.

Another example of a loan provision that can be problematic is a balloon payment. Some loans, including some mortgages in the US and many mortgages in Canada, have balloon payment provisions. For the initial period of time (often five years for Canadian mortgages), you make payments on your loan as if you were re-paying the loan over 30 years. However, at the end of the fifth year, the entire balance of the loan is due. The Canadian mortgage I reviewed requires the lender to re-finance the loan at the end of the fifth year, but at an interest rate that reflects the then-current interest rate environment and your then-current credit rating. In effect, that loan has an adjustable interest rate that depends not only on a benchmark interest rate but also changes in your credit score.

I consider any debt for which you don’t fully understand the terms, best avoided by reading the entirety of the loan document, as bad debt.

You Can’t Afford the Payments

When you enter into a loan agreement, you will be provided with the amount and timing of loan payments. With credit cards, the payments are usually due monthly and are a function of how much you charge and the card’s interest rate. Any debt that has payments that don’t fit in your budget is bad debt.   I would even take it one step further and say that any debt that has payments so high that you aren’t able to save for emergencies, large purchases and retirement is bad debt.

High Interest Rate

Some types of debt, such as credit cards and payday loans, have very high interest rates. The definition of a high interest rate depends on the economic conditions. Currently (around 2020), I would say any interest rate of more than 8% to 10% is high. By comparison, when I was young in the early 1980s, the interest rate on a 10-year US Government bond was more than 15% and mortgage rates were even higher.

If you have debt with high interest rates, you will be better off re-paying them as quickly as possible as you can’t earn a high enough investment return on any excess savings to cover the interest cost. That is, the investment return you can earn on the money, especially after tax, is going to be less than the interest rate you pay on the debt. In that case, it doesn’t make financial sense to invest any excess cash but rather you will be better off by using any excess cash to pay off the debt.

Depreciating Collateral

In many cases, debt is used to purchase something large, such as a boat, a home or a car. When you make a large purchase, the item you bought is considered collateral and the lender can take the collateral if you don’t make your loan payments.

The value of some items goes down (depreciates) faster than the principal of the loan. If you default on your payments when that happens, the lender is allowed to make you pay the difference. Determining whether your purchase is something that will retain its value or will depreciate quickly is a good test of whether it is financially responsible to use debt to make the purchase. If not, I would consider the purchase a poor use of debt.

No Long-Term Benefit

Many other purchases for which debt, such as credit cards and payday loans, is used have no long-term benefit. For example, if you buy a knick-knack for your home with a credit card and don’t pay the balance when the credit card is due, you will be paying interest for something that has no long-term benefit to you. I consider using debt for items or experiences with no long-term benefit to be bad.

There is a gray area. If you use debt to buy clothes that are required for your job, the clothes themselves don’t have a long-term benefit, but they could be considered as creating the ability to go to work and earn money.   As such, while I would normally consider clothes as a poor use of debt, I can see how work clothes that allow you to increase your income might need to be financed for a month or two on a credit card.

Characteristics of Good Debt (vs Bad Debt)

The first requirement of good debt is that it doesn’t have any of the characteristics of bad debt. That is, good debt:

  • Has terms you fully understand.
  • Fits in your budget, especially if your budget also includes saving for retirement, large purchases and an emergency fund.
  • Is one that has a reasonable interest rate.
  • Isn’t backed by depreciating collateral.
  • Is used for something with long-term benefit.

There are many ways in which a debt can create a long-term benefit. I’ve mentioned buying clothes required for a job that allows you to earn money, in particular a lot more money than the cost of paying off the debt.

Your Primary Residence

Most people borrow, using a mortgage, to purchase a home.   The market values of homes generally increase over long periods of time, though there are periods of times when the market values of homes decrease. In addition, there are a lot of carrying costs of owning a home, such as insurance, property taxes, maintenance and repairs. However, by owning a home, you don’t have to pay rent which, in theory, covers all of the costs of home ownership.

I think that buying a house is a good use of debt as long as the mortgage meets all of the criteria identified above. Although not specifically related to the use of debt, you might want to think carefully about buying a home (with or without debt) if you plan to live in it for only a short period of time. The transactions costs of buying and selling a home are high and you increase the likelihood that the value of the house will decrease if you own it for only a few years.

Your Car

Using debt to buy a car is also quite common. If you are using the debt to cover the cost of your only mode of transportation and you need it to get to work, it can be a good use of debt. Again, you’ll want to check that it has the other characteristics of good debt identified above.   Using debt to buy a car that is more expensive than you need or leads to loan payments that are higher than you can afford is not as good a use of debt.

Your Education

Many people use student loans to pay for college. From an economic perspective, student loans can be either good or bad. The criteria for evaluating the student loans are:

  • Will the increase in your wages will cover your loan payments?
  • Will you earn enough after graduation to allow the loan payments to fit in your budget?

For example, let’s say you can earn $30,000 a year if you don’t go to college and $40,000 if you get a degree. If you borrowed $50,000 a year for four years at 5% with a 10-year term, your payments would be more than $25,000 per year.

First Criterion

Over the term of the loan, your increase in wages ($10,000 per year) is less than your loan payments. Over your working life time, the return on your investment in your student loans is about 3.5%. The return on investment is positive, so the use of debt could be justified using the first criterion.

Second Criterion

It might be very difficult to cover the $25,000 of annual student loan payments on annual wages of $40,000 a year. If you are willing and able to live on $15,000 a year until your student loans are re-paid, they could be considered a good investment economically.

A smaller amount of debt or a larger increase in salary will improve the economic benefit of student loans. If you are considering student loans to finance your education, you’ll want to look at their economic costs and benefits carefully.

Your Business

When you start your own business, you often need to invest in one or more of equipment, inventory or a place to run your business.  Many people borrow money to make these initial investments. Starting a profitable business can be a very good use of debt, as it provides you the opportunity to increase your net worth. However, 30% of businesses fail in the first year and 50% fail in five years, according to the Small Business Administration, as reported by Investopedia. If you borrow money to start a small business and it fails, you will often still be liable for re-paying the debt, depending on whether you had to personally guarantee the loan or if the business was able to procure the loan.

Investing

There are at least a couple of ways you can use “debt” to invest.

Don’t Pre-Pay Your Debt

The most common way to use debt to invest is to invest extra money rather than using the money to pre-pay your mortgage or other debt. Whether it is good or bad to use this “debt” to increase your investing depends on several factors and your financial situation:

  • The longer the term on your debt, the better the choice is to invest instead of pre-paying your debt. If your loan payments only extend over a year or two, it is more likely that your investments will lose money making you worse off than if you pre-paid your loan. Over long periods of time, your investment returns are more likely to be positive.
  • The lower the interest rate on your debt, the better the choice it is to invest instead of pre-pay your debt. If the interest rate on your debt is higher than you can expect to earn on the investments you would buy (after considering income taxes), you will almost always be better off pre-paying your loan. If your interest rate is low, e.g., less than 3% or 4%, you are more likely to earn more in investment returns than the interest cost on your debt.
  • You have another source of income to make your loan payments if your investments decrease in value. For example, if you were planning to retire in the next few years, pre-paying your debt is more likely to be a better decision than investing. On the other hand, if you plan to have other sources of income besides your investments for the next 10 or more years, you might be better off investing rather than pre-paying your debt.

Investing on Margin

Another way you can use debt to invest is to buy your investments on margin. Under this approach, you borrow money from the brokerage (or similar) firm to buy your investments using your existing invested assets as collateral. In many cases, you can borrow up to 50% of the value of your existing assets. So, if you have $100,000 of stocks, you could borrow $50,000 to make additional investments.

The drawback of buying investments on margin is that the lender can make you re-pay the loan or a portion of it as soon as the value of the assets you own (the $100,000 of stocks in my example) decreases to less than twice the amount you’ve borrowed. Unfortunately, the amount you borrowed may have decreased in value at the same time while the amount you borrowed as stayed constant. As such, buying investments on margin is considered very risky and should be done only by people who fully understand all of its ramifications.

Final Thoughts on Good Debt vs. Bad Debt

Debt, when used carefully, can greatly improve your life and your ability to earn money. However, if you take on too much bad debt, it can lead to significant financial problems. This post has provided a framework to help you decide whether any debts you have or are considering are likely to be good debt vs bad debt.

Recovery from Financial Disaster

Ever wonder how you’d handle a complete reversal of your finances? I have a friend who had a lifestyle most people would envy and lost everything, including her marriage. I didn’t meet her until after her recovery from her financial disaster. She is one of the most resilient, generous people I know and was kind enough to let me interview her about the changes in her life, the financial lessons she learned and her advice to you on how to avoid finding yourself in a similar situation.

The High Life

“My life was very plentiful with many material objects.

  • 6,000+ square foot custom designed home – 6 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms and two full kitchens
  • Photography and recording studios
  • In ground swimming pool
  • Custom designed furniture
  • Six cars
  • Trips
  • Private education for both kids
  • Entertainment

I never priced groceries, just grab and dash.  We belonged to a private country club as well.  We also had an investment property that we rented to a family member.”

Tell Me about Your Finances

“I did not think of my financial future.  I was in my mid to late 40s and I thought the gravy train would never stop.  We had many investments, 401(k) and IRA retirement accounts for us as well as the children.  My husband was a very successful stock broker, financial planner and money management specialist. We had a dual income, and mine paid for the cream on the top.”

What Happened?

“The stock market along with the real estate market became very soft in 2007.  When I began to notice that these change were imminent, I suggested that we liquidate assets into a strong cash position.  My husband dismissed my thoughts on this topic because I had never been persistent in being a co-manager of our funds.  The economy was showing its ugly powerful head and so was our 40-year marriage.

Things went from bad to worse.  We lost our home. Instead of getting money from the buyer when we sold our house, we had to come to closing with a six-figure check to pay off the mortgage balance (because we owed more than we got for the house). Otherwise, we would have had to negotiate a short sale with the holders of the loan on the house to try to get them to accept only the amount for which we sold it, but chose to close in a traditional manner due to a prideful attitude that made no sense at all.

We divorced.  The money, the investments and the lifestyle were gone.  I was 59 years old. Our children were grown and gone.  Thank God they had their educations!”

What Did You Do?

“I moved into a house with five other people to secure a reasonable rent of $600 a month.  I rolled up my sleeves and decided to re-invent myself as a strong salesperson with a steady stream of income.  As part of creating a fiscally responsible lifestyle, I consolidated my debt and made a conscious effort to understand my taxes and my expenses.  These changes allowed me to pay off the tax liability for which I was half responsible after the divorce.”

What is Your Life like Now?

“My lifestyle now is very simple.

  • I use one credit card.
  • If I can’t afford something, I don’t buy it.
  • I shop at thrift stores, make curtains, paint, have learned some electrical skills and can do just about anything.

Having made the financial changes, I now have the opportunity to travel. I have investments and simple monthly debt. My credit score is very high and I am able to contribute to my savings account and an IRA on a regular basis.”

What Advice Do You Have?

“I learned these financial lessons that might help your readers:

  • Always know your cash position whether or not you are wealthy.
  • Have a good grasp on your finances.  Knowledge is power.
  • Cash is king.
  • Know your financial position at all times.
  • Stay away from credit cards and their incredible interest rates.
  • Save and keep adding to your retirement.”

Closing Thoughts from Susie Q

You’ll notice that my friend’s financial lessons learned are similar to themes you’ve seen in posts I’ve written, especially in the post on advice we gave our kids.

Her story, though, provides real-life insights into why these actions are so important.

You’d never know if you met my friend now that she had to make such a long recovery from financial disaster. She is always upbeat, willing to lend a hand and a great motivator. In fact, she contributed to the initial costs of this blog because she was so thrilled that I am willing to share my knowledge with others to help them be financially literate. I hope I am as resilient as she is if I ever face an equally daunting challenge.

Top Ten Posts in Our First Year

Financial IQ by Susie Q celebrated its first birthday last week. In the first year, we published 52 posts on our site, two of which were guest posts from other authors, and published two posts on other blogs. In case you haven’t had time to keep up with reading the posts as they are published, we provide you with a list of our ten posts with the highest page views. (We note that there were two periods during which our site wasn’t “talking” to Google Analytics, so there might be a few posts that should have made the top ten, but didn’t.)

#1 Advice We Gave our Kids

This post had almost 1,000 page views in large part because it is the only post we’ve had featured on Money Mix. It provides a list of 7 themes about money that my kids heard frequently as they were growing up or as they were starting to make their own financial decisions. In addition, I added two other pieces of advice I wished I had given them.

#2 Should Chris Pre-Pay His Mortgage

This post was one of my favorite ones to write! Chris @MoneyStir published a post given a lot of detail about his financial situation. He asked others whether their opinion on whether he should pre-pay his mortgage. In my response, I showed Chris that, given his particular circumstances, he would be substantially better off after he fully re-paid his mortgage a large percentage of the time if he invested his extra cash instead of using it to pre-pay his mortgage. One of the broader takeaways from this post is the importance of isolating a single decision and not confusing your thinking by combining separate decisions into one process.

#3 Introduction to Budgeting

Introduction to Budgeting was our very first post. I’m not sure how high on the list it would have been had we published it later, as many of our friends viewed the post just to see what we were doing. I still think budgeting, whether done in great detail or at a high level, is a critical component of financial literacy, so hope that it is valuable to our regular followers and not just our curious friends.

#4 What to Do Once You have Savings

This post is the first in a series of three posts intended to provide a framework and guidance once you have some savings. The series talks about how much to put in emergency savings, how to save for big-ticket items, savings for retirement and deciding whether to pre-pay your student loans. For each type of savings, it provides suggestions for appropriate asset choices.

#5 Getting Started with Budgeting

This post is the first in a series of nine posts on how to create a detailed budget. The process starts with tracking your expenses to see how you are spending your money.  Subsequent posts talk about setting financial goals and figuring out how you want to spend your money.  The series finishes with monitoring your expenses to see how you are doing relative to your budget. This post includes a spreadsheet that allows you to track your expenses.

#6 New vs Used Cars

This post totals up all of the costs of owning a car to help you understand how much better off you might be by buying a used car rather than a new car.  For some cars, it is much less expensive to buy used, whereas for other cars it doesn’t cost much more to buy new especially if you plan to own it for a long time.

#7 Traditional vs Roth Retirement Plans

This post provides lots of information about Traditional and Roth IRAs and 401(k)s. It also explains in what situations a Roth is better than a Traditional plan and vice versa, including some examples. The biggest determinant of that decision is your expectations about your marginal tax rate at the time you save relative to your marginal tax rate at the time you make withdrawals. The post provides lots of information on taxes, too, to help you make that decision.

#8 New Cars: Cash, Lease or Borrow?

This post explains the costs related to buying a new car with cash, leasing a new car and borrowing to pay for a new car. It provides a detailed illustration for three different models.  The best choice among those three options depends on your ability to pay cash, how many miles you plan to drive, and the terms of each individual offer. For some cars and situations, leasing is less expensive than borrowing whereas, for others, borrowing is better. It also provides a spreadsheet that allows you to compare your offers.

#9 Car Insurance

I was surprised that this post made the top 10.  I spent my entire career in the insurance business so probably have forgotten how complicated car insurance is! This post describes all of the important terms and coverages you’ll find in a car insurance policy. It also provides some insights on how to decide what coverages, deductibles and limits to select.

#10 Health Insurance

On the other hand, it didn’t surprise me at all that this post made the top 10. In fact, I would have expected it to rate higher than it did. As with #9, this post explains all of the terms included in health insurance policies. Its companion post explains how to select the health insurance plan that best meets your needs and your budget.  That post includes a spreadsheet that follows along with the calculations. I recently had to select an individual health insurance plan as my COBRA benefits expired.  I used exactly the process described in this post to make my decision!

The Best Ways to Pay Off Your Debt

The Best Ways to Pay Off Your Debt

The best way to pay off your short-term and revolving debt depends on your priorities and what motivates you.  Two of the common approaches for determining the order in which to re-pay your loans discussed in financial literacy circles are the Debt Snowball and Debt Avalanche approaches.

Both of these methods apply when you have more than one debt that needs to be re-paid.  If you have only one debt to re-pay, the best strategy is to pay it down as quickly as possible, making the minimum payments as often as you can to avoid finance charges which will be added to your principal in addition to the interest charges on any portion of your balance you don’t pay.

In this post, I’ll describe how the two debt-repayment methods work using some illustrations.  I will then help you understand which approach might be better for you.  For more information about the fundamentals of debt, check out my posts on loans and credit cards.

What’s Included and What’s Not

The debts covered by this post include credit cards (one kind of revolving debt), personal loans, car loans and other bills that are overdue. While longer-term loans, such as mortgages, are referenced in the budgeting process, I haven’t included them in the debt re-payment examples. If you have unpaid short-term debt, you’ll want to keep up with the payments on these longer-term loans first, but don’t need to pre-pay them. For this discussion, I will assume that you intend to re-pay all of your debts to your current debtholders. That is, you haven’t dug a hole so deep you need to declare bankruptcy and you don’t feel you’ll benefit from transferring some or all of your high-interest rate loan balances to one with a lower interest (i.e., debt consolidation).

Debt Snowball

Dave Ramsay, a well-known author on financial literacy topics, proposed the Debt Snowball method for paying off your debts.  Under this method, you do the following:

  1. Identify all of your debts, including the amounts of the minimum payments.
  2. Make a budget. (See this post for more on budgeting generally or this one for the first of a step-by-step series on budgeting including a helpful spreadsheet.) Your budget should include all of your expenses excluding your short-term and revolving debts but including the payments you plan to make on your longer-term debts (e.g., car loans and mortgages).
  3. Determine the total amount left in your budget available to re-pay your debts, remembering that you need to be able to pay for the total cost of all of your current purchases before you start paying off the balances on your existing debt. If the amount available to re-pay debts is less than the total of your minimum payments, you may need to look into your options to consolidate or re-structure your debts, get them forgiven or declare bankruptcy.
  4. Otherwise, make the minimum payment on all of your debts except the smallest one.
  5. Take everything left over in your budget from step (3) and reduce it by the sum of the minimum payments in step (4). Use that balance to pay off your smallest debt. After you fully re-pay the smallest debt, you’ll apply the remainder to the next smallest debt and so on.

Debt Avalanche

The Debt Avalanche method is very similar to the Debt Snowball method, except you re-pay your debts in a different order.

The first three steps under the Debt Avalanche method are the same as the first three steps under the Debt Snowball method.  It differs from the Debt Snowball method in that you pay the minimum payment on all of your debts except the one with the highest interest rate at any given time instead of the one with the smallest balance.

Examples

I’ve created the two examples to compare the two methods.  In both examples, I have assumed that you use a different credit card or pay cash for all new purchases until your current credit card balances are re-paid.  That is, to make progress on getting out of debt, you need to not only make extra payments on your existing debts, but also not create additional debt by borrowing to pay for new purchases.  It’s tough!

Example 1

In this example, you have two debts with the balances due, interest rates and minimum payments shown in the table below.

Example 1Balance DueInterest RateMinimum Payment
Debt 1$1,50020%$30
Debt 250010%10

You have determined you have  $100 available to pay off these two debts.  The minimum payments total $40 in this example, so you have $60 available to pay off more of the principal on your debts.

Example 1: Debt Snowball

Under the Debt Snowball method, you will use the additional $60 a month you have to pay off Debt 2 first, as it has the smaller balance.  That is, you will pay the minimum payment of $30 a month on Debt 1 and $70 a month on Debt 2 for 8 months, at which point Debt 2 will be fully re-paid.  You will then apply the full $100 a month to Debt 1 for the next 17 months until it is fully re-paid

Under this approach, you will have fully re-paid both debts in 25 months and will pay $428 in interest charges.

Example 1:  Debt Avalanche

In Example 1, you will use the additional $60 a month you have to pay off Debt 1 first under the Debt Avalanche method, as it has the higher interest rate, whereas you used the additional amount to pay off Debt 2 first under the Debt Snowball method.  That is, you will pay the minimum balance of $10 a month on Debt 2 and $90 a month on Debt 1 for 20 months, at which point Debt 1 will be fully re-paid.  You will then apply the full $100 a month to Debt 2 for the next 4 months until it is fully re-paid

Under this approach, you will have fully re-paid both debts in 24 months and will pay $352 in interest charges.

Example 2

In this example, you have five debts with the balances due, interest rates and minimum payments shown in the table below.

Example 2Balance DueInterest RateMinimum Payment
Debt 1$1,00010%$40
Debt 25000%25
Debt 310,00020%100
Debt 43,00015%75
Debt 57505%30

You have $500 available to pay off these debts.  In this example, the minimum payments total $270, so you have $230 available to pay off the principal on your debts in addition to the principal included in the minimum payments.

Example 2: Debt Snowball

Example 2 is a bit more complicated because there are more debts.  As a reminder, under this approach, you apply all of your extra payments ($230 in this example) to the smallest debt at each point in time.  In this example, you will make the additional payments on your debts in the following order:

Debt 2

Debt 5

Debt 1

Debt 4

Debt 3

It takes only two months to pay off Debt 2 and another four months to pay off Debt 4.  As such, you will have fully re-paid two of your debts in six months.  In total, it will take 43 months to re-pay all of your loans and you will pay $5,800 in interest.

Example 2:  Debt Avalanche

In this example, you will make the additional payments on your debts in the following order:

Debt 3

Debt 4

Debt 1

Debt 5

Debt 2

It turns out that Debt 2 is fully re-paid in 20 months even just making the minimum payments.  Debt 5 is paid off 7 months later again with only minimum payments, followed by Debt 1 2 months later.  As each of these debts is re-paid, the amounts of their minimum payments are added to the payment on Debt 3 until it is fully re-paid after 39 months.  At that point, the full $500 a month is applied towards Debt 4 which then takes only 2 additional months to fully re-pay.  In total, it will take 41 months to re-pay all of your loans and you will pay $5,094 in interest.

Comparison

Dollars and Sense – Two Examples

Looking at the two examples, we can get a sense for how much more interest you will pay if you use the Debt Snowball method instead of the Debt Avalanche method.  The table below compares the two methods under both examples.

Example 1Example 2
Interest PaidMonths of PaymentsInterest PaidMonths of Payments
Snowball$42825$5,80043
Avalanche352245,09441
Difference7417062

In these two examples, you pay more than 10% more interest if you use the Debt Snowball method than the Debt Avalanche method, leading to one or two additional months before your debts are fully re-paid.

Dollars and Sense – In General

The difference in the amount of additional interest depends on whether your debts are similar in size and the differences in the interest rates.  I’ll take that statement apart to help you understand it.

  • If the debt with the lower interest rate is very small, you will pay it off quickly.  As a result, there is only a very short period of time during which you are paying the higher interest on the larger loan under the Debt Snowball method.  As such, there will be very little difference in the total amount of interest paid between the two methods in that case.
  • If the debts all have about the same interest rate, it doesn’t really matter which one you re-pay first, as the interest charges on that first loan will be very similar to the interest charges on your other loans.

Dollars and Sense – Illustration

The graph below illustrates the impact of the differences in interest rates and sizes of two loans on the difference in the total interest paid.  To create this graph, I took different variations of Example 1.  That is, you have two loans with outstanding balances totaling $2,000 and the interest rate on the larger debt is 20%.

 

How to Read the Axes

The interest rate on the smaller loan was calculated as 20% minus the increment shown on the axis labeled on the right.  That is, the interest rate on the smaller loan for scenarios near the “front” of the graph was 18% or 2 percentage points lower than the 20% interest rate on the larger loan.  Near the “back” of the graph, the interest rate on the smaller loan is 0% or 20 percentage points lower than the interest rate on the larger loan.

The loan balance on the smaller loan divided by the total debt amount of $2,000 is shown on the axis that goes from left to right.  The small loan is $40 (2% of $2,000) at the far left of the graph and increases as you move to the right to $960 (48% of $2,000) on the far right.  Note that, if the small loan exceeded $1,000, it would have become the bigger loan!

The Green Curve

The green curve corresponds to the total interest paid using the Debt Snowball method minus the total interest paid using the Debt Avalanche method.  For example, at the front left, corresponding to the small loan being $40 with an 18% (=20% – 2%) interest rate, there is a $2 difference in the amount of interest paid.  At the other extreme, in the back right of the graph (0% interest rate on a small loan with a balance of $960), you will pay $167 more in interest ($308 versus $140 or more than twice as much) if you use the Debt Snowball method rather than the Debt Avalanche method.

What It Means

Interestingly, moving along only one axis – that is, only decreasing the interest rate on the small loan or only increasing the size of the smaller loan – doesn’t make very much difference.  In the back left and front right, the interest rate differences are only $15 and $22, respectively.  The savings from the Debt Avalanche method becomes most important when there is a large difference in the interest rates on the loans and the outstanding balances on the loans are similar in size.

Sense of Accomplishment

For many people, debt is an emotional or “mental-state” issue rather than a financial problem.  In those situations, it is more important to gain a sense of accomplishment than it is to save money on interest.  If you are one of those people  and have one or more small debts that you can fully re-pay fairly quickly (such as Debts 2 and 5 in Example 2 both of which were paid off in six months under the Debt Snowball method), using the Debt Snowball method is likely to be much more successful.

Key Points

Here are the key points from this post:

  • A budget will help you figure out how much you can afford to apply to your debts each month.
  • If you can’t cover your minimum payments, you’ll need to consider some form of consolidation, re-financing or even bankruptcy, none of which are covered in this post.
  • If you have only one debt to re-pay, the best strategy is to pay it down as quickly as possible, but making the minimum payments as often as you can to avoid finance charges.
  • You will always pay at least as much, and often more, interest when you use the Debt Snowball method as compared to the Debt Avalanche method.
  • Unless you have two or more debts that are all about the same size and have widely varying interest rates, the total interest you will pay is essentially the same regardless of the order in which you re-pay them.  As such, if the sense of accomplishment you get from paying off a few debts will help keep you motivated, using the Debt Snowball method may be the right choice for you.
  • If you have two or more debts that are all about the same size and have disparate interest rates, you will want to use the Debt Avalanche Approach.  Because the balances are all about the same, it will take about the same amount of time to re-pay the first loan regardless of which loan you choose to re-pay first!  As such, it is better to focus on the interest you will save by using the Debt Avalanche approach.