Selecting Stocks with a Score

My husband really likes selecting stocks with a score, the Piotroski score in particular.  Briefly, Professor Piotroski created a set of nine financial ratios that contribute to the score. If a company meets a certain criterion and has favorable results on 8 or 9 of the ratios, his analysis indicates that the company’s stock is likely to do well. My husband is primarily a value investor. The appeal of the Piotroski score to my husband is that it focuses on value stocks and, while it relies heavily on statistical analysis, it isn’t a black box.

In this post, I’ll identify the group of stocks to which the Piotroski score applies. I’ll then briefly explain the financial ratios that determine the score. I’ll close with a specific example of a stock I bought solely using the Piotroski score and provide some general guidance on applying the results of the score.

Book-to-Market Ratio

What is It?

The book-to-market (BM) ratio is a financial ratio. The numerator is the book value of the company. This value is shown on the balance sheet in the company’s financial statements and is usually reported as “Shareholders’ Equity.”

The denominator of the ratio is the total market value of the company on the evaluation date as the financial statements. The total market value is the stock price multiplied by the number of shares outstanding and is also called the market capitalization.

In mathematical terms,

Piotroski waits for the financial statements to be published for a particular year end to get the book value. He then looks up the market capitalization on the evaluation date of the financial statements for use in the ratio.

Piotroski’s Criterion

In his paper, Piotroski identifies value stocks as companies that have BM Ratios in the highest quintile (highest 20%) of traded stocks. These stocks have high book values relative to their market capitalization. Looked at from the other perspective, these stocks have low market capitalizations (and therefore low stock prices) relative to their book value.

Recall that the book value is the company’s assets minus its liabilities. In theory, if the company were liquidated on the evaluation date of the financials, shareholders would get their portion of the Shareholders’ Equity, based on the proportion of shares owned. Therefore, a BM ratio of 1.00 means that the market capitalization of the stock is equal to the Shareholders’ Equity.

By comparison, the cut-off for the highest quintile of BM ratios[1] across all stocks reported in the ValueLine Analyzer Plus on May 29, 2020 is 1.47. The book values per share of these companies are almost 50% higher than their stock prices!   You can see why Piotroski might consider these stocks to be potentially good values at their current prices.

Why Might It Be High?

There are at least two reasons that the BM ratio might be high.

First, the market may perceive that either assets are overvalued or liabilities are undervalued. Both of these situations would cause the reported book value to be higher than its true amount.

For example, some companies have not fully funded their pension plans. That means that the estimated present value of the future pension benefits is more than the liability on the balance sheet. Companies disclose these differences in the Notes to Financial Statements. If the liability for pension benefits is understated, it will cause the company’s book value to be overstated.

Second, financial theory tells us that the market value of a company’s stock is equal to its book value plus the present value of future profits. If the market perceives that the company is unlikely to make money in the future, the market capitalization will be less than the book value.

The Piotroski score focuses on companies in the second category. That is, it attempts to identify companies that will be profitable in the future from among all of the companies that the market thinks will have negative future profits.

Piotroski Score

The Piotroski score is calculated as the sum of a set of 9 values of 1 or 0. There are 9 criteria in the calculation, in addition to the BM ratio being in the highest quintile. The process assigns a 1 if a company’s financial statement values meet each criterion and a 0 if it does not. As such, companies that meet 8 or 9 of the criteria are considered more likely to have above market average performance.

The 9 criteria are listed below:

  1. Return on assets (ROA) = Net income / Total assets at beginning of year > 0
  2. ROA this year > ROA last year
  3. Cash flow from operations > 0
  4. Cash flow from operations > net income
  5. Long-term debt / Total assets this year < Long-term debt / Total assets last year
  6. Current ratio this year > current ratio last year
  7. Shares outstanding this year <= shares outstanding last year
  8. Gross margin this year > gross margin last year
  9. Total sales / Total assets this year > Total sales / Total assets last year

Piotroski performed his analysis using data from companies’ financial statements from 1976 to 1996. The average of the one-year returns for the companies with scores of 8 or 9 was 7.5 percentage points higher than the average for all companies with high BM ratios and 13.5 percentage points higher than the average for the market as a whole.

How to Calculate It

If you are familiar with reading financial statements, you can calculate the Piotroski score yourself using the formulas above. Or, you could extract the key ratios from a source, such as ValueLine, Tiingo or Bloomberg, all three of which require subscriptions. I use the latter approach as I have a subscription to ValueLine that I use for a variety of purposes.

An easier option is to use a Piotroski calculator or screener.   I’ve never used any of these tools, but I used Google to find a couple free options you might try.

  • Old School Value – This Excel spreadsheet will calculate and show you how a company does on each of the 9 tests and the total score.
  • ChartMill – This screener lets you identify stocks based on their Piotroski score. As such, it helps you find stocks with scores of 8 or 9, but does not show you the details of the underlying calculation.

I suggest being careful to check the documentation of any of these tools to make sure that the descriptions of the 9 tests are the same as I’ve included above (which I took directly from Piotroski’s paper). In poking around on-line, I found more than one site that did not correctly specify the nine tests.

My Experience Selecting Stocks with a Score

Although I’ve looked at stocks using the Piotroski score several times, I’ve made only one purchase using it as my primary buying criterion. I purchased FUJIFILMS (FUJIY) in March 2012. At the time, FUJIY had a BM Ratio of about 1.40, as compared to a market average BM ratio of about 0.5. It had a Piotroski score of 8, having failed the test for an increase in gross margin.

For many, many years, FUJIY’s biggest product was film for cameras. With the advent of the digital camera, its market shrank rapidly. In the year before I purchased the stock, its price decreased by 32%. As I was looking at the company, it was transitioning its business from camera film to other types of related products, including medical imaging and, more recently, office products with its purchase of Xerox. With a good story and a high Piotroski score, I decided to buy the stock.

It turns out I was a little early in buying the stock. In the 12 months after I bought the stock, it decreased by 19% while the S&P 500 increased by 13%. However, if I had bought it a year later, my total return would have been much better over both the short and long term, as shown in the table below.

Total Return starting in March 2013
1 Year2 YearsUntil June 2020
FUJIFILMS+51%+84%+171%
S&P 500+22%+36%+110%

 

So, even though my returns were lower than the market average because I bought the stock too early in the company’s turnaround, I correctly decided to keep it after its first year of poor performance. That is, if I had sold the stock one year after I purchased it and bought an S&P 500 index fund, I would have been worse off.

Caution

As with any investing strategy, it is important that you understand the assumptions underlying the Piotroski score. I also recommend that you understand the story behind the company you are considering for investment, as described in my post on buying stocks based on their financial fundamentals. There are companies that may have a Piotroski score of 8 or 9 that don’t have a good turn-around story, such as the one I described for FUJIY. In those cases, you may not want to rely solely on the Piotroski score.

 

[1] Calculated in this case as Book Value Per Share at most recent fiscal year end divided by Price on May 29, 2020, so not exactly equal to the ratio as calculated by Piotroski.

Picking Stocks Using Pictures

Picking Stocks using Pictures

Technical analysts select companies for their portfolio based on patterns in stock prices.  That is, it allows them to enhance their process of picking stocks by using pictures. This approach is very different from some of the others I’ve discussed, as buy and sell decisions are based in large part on these patterns and less on the financial fundamentals of the company. Every technical analyst has a favorite set of graphs he or she likes to review and their own thresholds that determine when to buy or sell a particular stock.

I’ve done just a little trading based on technical analysis, so asked Rick Lage, a family friend who has much more experience with this approach, to help me out. In this post, I will provide some background on Rick and provide explanations of the graphs he uses. I’ll also provide some insights on who I think is best suited for this type of trading.

Rick’s Story

Rick’s Background

“I was first introduced to the stock market in a Junior High School math class. I made my first trade with a stockbroker about 6 years after graduating from High School.

My interest in the stock market never faded. I was always focused on this platform to make money. Unfortunately losing money was a regular occurrence for many years in the beginning, with not many gains to be proud of.

My interest peaked in 1999 when I attended my first stock trading event in Las Vegas, known as the TradersExpo[1]. TradersExpo provides a wealth of information available for the beginner to the pro, including hardware, trading software, classroom instruction and more.

I personally have never been a day trader. Swing trading is more my definition. I do touch base with my stock watch list daily. It’s always managed and checking my technical indicators is a must.”

Rick’s Goals

“I stock trade for the challenge; not so much for the fun or success. If there is success the fun will follow. There will be losses. No doubt. But you learn how to manage those losses. You have no choice. Technical trading is my science.”

Rick’s Advice to New Traders

Rick says, “I have tried hard to never complicate the trade. There are many technical indicators, so don’t get overwhelmed. I pick stocks that have the momentum. Pick your favorite few indicators and go with those.”

Rick’s Tools

Rick’s favorite indicators are

  • Simple Moving Averages using 9 and 180 days (SMA 9 and SMA 180)
  • Price and Volume Charts
  • Relative Strength Index (RSI)
  • Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD)
  • Heikin-Ashi bar chart

I will provide brief introductions to each of these indicators, illustrating each with two stocks – Apple and Shopify. A graph of Apple’s stock prices from January 1, 2018 through mid-May 2020 is shown below. It had some ups and downs in price in 2018 and 2019, followed by a significant decrease and recovery so far in 2020.

Shopify had a steadier increase in 2018 and 2019, but much more volatility so far in 2020, as illustrated in the graph below.

Simple Moving Averages (SMA 180 and 9)

In this context, a simple moving average (SMA) is the average of the closing prices for the past n days, where n is specified by the person making the chart. In Rick’s case, he looks at the 180-day simple moving average and the 9-day simple moving average. For the former, he takes the average of the closing prices for the previous 180 days; for the latter, the average of the closing prices for the previous 9 days.

SMA Charts

Technical analysts add their favorite SMA lines to the chart of the stock’s price. For illustration, I’ve added the SMA 180 and SMA 9 lines to the Shopify and Apple stock price charts below.

SMA Indicators

Technical analysts then look at the crossing points on the chart to provide buy and sell indications. For example, a technical analyst might look at when the closing price line (black in these charts) goes up through the SMA 180 line (blue in these charts) and call it a buy signal or an indication of a time to buy a stock. You can see an example of a buy signal, using this method, for Shopify around May 1, 2019, as indicated by the green circle.  The buy signals for Apple are much more frequent using this criterion, two of which are indicated with green circles.

Similarly, a technical analyst might look at when the SMA 9 line (yellow/orange in these charts) goes down through the SMA 180 line and call it a sell signal. Using this criterion, there was a clear sell signal for Apple in early November 2018, as indicated by the red circle.

Every technical analyst has his or her favorite time periods for SMA lines. In addition, each technical analyst selects his or her own criteria for buy and sell signals based on those SMA lines. The shorter the time period associated with the SMA, the more often buy and sell transactions will be indicated. When I use SMA graphs to inform my buy and sell decisions, I use fairly long time periods as I am a long-term investor. By comparison, some people trade in and out of stocks several times a day, so use very short time periods, such as minutes or hours.

Price and Volume

A price and volume chart shows plots of both the price of a stock and its volume on a daily basis, color-coded to indicate whether the stock price went up or down each day. The graph below is a price and volume chart for Shopify.

The upper chart has rectangles (called boxes), sometimes with lines sticking out of them (called whiskers). The combination of the boxes and whiskers is often called a candle. There is one candle for each trading day.

Price & Volume Indicators

A red box indicates that the price was lower at the end of the day than at the end of the previous day; a green box, higher. Green boxes can be interpreted as follows:

  • The bottom of the box is the opening price.
  • The top of the box is the closing price.
  • The bottom of any whisker sticking down from the box is the lowest price on that day. If there is no downward whisker, the lowest daily price and the opening price were the same.
  • The top of any whisker sticking up from the box is the highest price on that day. If there is no upward whisker, the highest daily price and the closing price were the same.

Red boxes can be similarly interpreted, but the opening price is the top of the box and the closing price is the bottom of the box.

The lower section of the chart shows the number of shares traded each day. If the bar is green, the stock price went up that day, while red corresponds to down.

Technical analysts use these charts to identify trends. A really tall green bar in the lower section green is an indication that a lot of people think the stock will go up so are buying. Many technical analysts consider this a buy signal. Similarly, a really tall red bar is considered by some to be a sell signal. My sense is that you need to be very quick to respond using this type of strategy, as you don’t want to sell a stock after everyone has already sold it and the price has dropped or buy it after the price has increased.

Relative Strength Index (RSI)

The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is intended to measure whether a company’s stock is in an over-bought or over-sold position. If it is over-sold, it is a buy signal; if over-bought, a sell signal. The RSI is one of a broad class of measures called oscillators, all of which are intended to evaluate whether the market is over-bought or over-sold.

The RSI is determined based on a moving average of recent gains and the moving average of recent losses. The value of the RSI is scaled so it always falls between 0 and 100.

The RSI was developed by J. Welles Wilder. He considers the market over-bought when RSI is greater than 70 and oversold when it is below 30. There are many other ways in which the RSI chart can be used to identify trends and inform trading decisions that are outside the scope of this post.

The chart below shows the RSI for Apple (blue) and Shopify (orange).

The red horizontal line corresponds to RSI equal 70, Wilder’s over-bought signal. The green line is Wilder’s over-sold signal at RSI equals 30.

In this chart, there are several times when both stocks were over-bought. That is, the RSI for both stocks goes above the red line. Apple was considered slightly over-sold a few times, when the blue line crossed below the green line. By comparison, Shopify’s RSI came close to indicating that it was over-sold a few times, but never went below the green line.

Moving Average Convergence Divergence

The Moving Average Convergence Divergence indicator (MACD) is similar to the Simple Moving Average indicator discussed above. However, it uses an exponentially weighted moving average (EMA) instead of a simple moving average. A simple moving average gives the same weight to each observation. An exponentially weighted moving average gives more weight to more recent observations. MACD can use any period – minutes, hours, days, etc. For this illustration, I will set the period equal to a day. If you are trading more often, you’ll want to replace “day” in the explanation below with “hour” or “minute.”

The MACD was defined by its designer as the 12-day moving average (EMA 12) minus the 26-day moving average (EMA 26). MACD is compared to its own 9-day moving average to determine buy and sell signals. As with the simple moving average, the MACD crossing its 9-day moving average in the upward direction is a buy signal. When MACD falls below its 9-day moving average, it is a sell signal.

MACD Charts

The graph below shows Shopify’s daily closing prices along with the EMA 12 and EMA 26 lines in orange and green, respectively, starting on February 1, 2020.

This next chart shows the corresponding values of MACD (black) and its 9-day moving average (green).

If you compare the two graphs, you can see that MACD goes below the 0 line on the second chart on April 1, 2020. This transition is consistent with the orange line crossing above the green line on the first chart on the same date.

MACD Indicators

When Shopify’s MACD is bullish, its MACD is greater than its 9-day moving average or the black line is above the green line in the second chart above. This situation has been seen several times in the past few months – for short periods starting on February 11, March 23 and May 4 and a longer period starting on April 9.

The Apple MACD chart, shown below, has gone back and forth between bullish and bearish (black line below the green line) much more often in the past few months. It sometimes changes from bearish to bullish and back again on almost a daily basis.

The “convergence” and “divergence” part of MACD’s name refers to how the MACD behaves relative to the price. The relationship is somewhat complicated, so I suggest you refer to one of the sources I mention below if you are interested in this feature of MACD charts.

Heikin-Ashi bar chart

Also known as a Heikin-Ashi candlestick chart, the Heikin-Ashi bar chart is similar to the price part of the Price-Volume chart described above.   However, instead of using the actual high, low, open and close prices, all four of the points on the candle are calculated in a different manner. The purpose of the adjustments is to make a chart that makes identifying trends easier. I refer you to one of the resources below to learn the details of how these values are adjusted.

Heikin-Ashi Charts

The charts below show the Heikin-Ashi charts for Shopify and Apple for the past six months.

As mentioned, they look a lot like Price charts, except the boxes corresponding to the adjusted open and close and the whiskers corresponding to the adjusted high and low. The boxes are colored green when the adjusted close is higher than the previous adjusted close and red otherwise.

Heikin-Ashi Indicators

Here are some of the indicators people review when using Heikin-Ashi charts:

  • Longer boxes are indicative of trends. In the charts above, you can see that the Apple chart tends to have longer boxes than the Shopify chart.
  • When there is no whisker on one end of the box, the trend is even stronger. For example, neither the Apple nor Shopify charts have upward whiskers on the red boxes from mid-February to mid-March 2020. This time period corresponds to the time period highlighted by the red arrow on the chart below when both stocks’ prices were going down.

Similarly, almost none of the green bars in the last month of the Heishen Ashi chart have downward whiskers, corresponding to the time period in the price chart indicated by the green arrow.

Time periods when the boxes are short, have both whiskers and change color often are indicators of changes. For example, the Apple Heikin-Ashi chart from mid-January to mid-February shows several bars of alternating colors. Apple’s price changed from an upward trend to a downward trend in this period, as shown in the purple circle in the chart below. Identifying turning points is very important in deciding when to buy and sell stocks.

Who Can Use Technical Analysis

Technical analysis isn’t for everyone. It requires people who (a) have the ability to focus on markets fairly closely every day in the case of swing traders or all day in the case of day traders, (b) are happy with growing their portfolio with a large number of small “wins,” and (c) have a solid understanding of the charts being used.

Time Commitment

Unlike many other investment strategies, many day traders and swing traders do not consider a company’s financial fundamentals in their buy decisions. Instead, they monitor the patterns in their charts. Without the comfort of believing that the companies they own have sound fundamentals, it is important that they follow their charts consistently so they can quickly sell any positions that are not meeting expectations.

Lots of Small Wins

In my post on financial fundamentals, I talk about Peter Lynch’s concept of a 10-bagger – a stock whose value is at least 10 times what you paid for it. In that paradigm, the goal is to attain better-than-market-average returns by getting average returns on most of the positions in your portfolio and big gains on one or two positions.

By comparison, the goal of day traders and swing traders is to make a very small amount of money on every trade, but to make lots and lots of those trades. If you earn 0.1% on average on every trading day, it compounds to just over 20% a year!

For many of us, buying and selling with gains of less than 0.1% per security seems really small and might not seem worthwhile. As such, you need to be willing to be happy with lots of little wins rather than a 10-bagger if you want to be a day trader or swing trader.

Understand the Charts

One of the requirements of using technical analysis is to make sure you understand how to interpret the charts correctly. For example, Southwest Airlines (ticker: LUV) has done very poorly recently from the impact of COVID-19. The plot below shows its closing stock price from February 15, 2020 through May 20, 2020.

As can be seen, the last stock price on the graph (about $29) is almost exactly half of the stock price in mid-February (peaked at $58.54). As such, while it has had a few days on which the price increased, the overall trend has been down.

The RSI chart is shown below. Remember that an RSI value of less than 30 is an indication that it might be time to buy the stock.

In this example, there was a buy signal when the RSI crossed below the green line (30) on February 25. The closing stock price on that day was $49.66. If you had bought the stock on that date, you would have lost 41% in the subsequent three months as the stock was at $29 on May 20, 2020.

As you can see, interpreting charts takes time and expertise. If you are willing to invest the time to learn all of the nuances of each type of chart and monitor your positions, technical analysis might be the right investing strategy for you.

There’s a lot more to know about each of these indicators than I’ve provided in this post. Here are a few links to other sources of information to learn more.

  • Stock Charts
  • Technical Analysis for the Trading Professional by Constance Brown, McGraw-Hill Education, 2nd Edition, 2012.
  • Investopedia

How I Use Technical Analysis

I primarily rely on analysis of the underlying fundamentals of a company when I purchase individual stocks. Once I make the decision to buy a stock, I look at the charts to evaluate whether the timing is good for a purchase. If the consensus of the charts I review indicates that the position is over-bought (i.e., price is too high), I will wait to see if the price decreases before buying.

In addition, I use technical analysis in my Roth IRA, where there are no capital gains taxes on trades so more frequent trading isn’t adversely impacted. I follow a large handful of industry ETFs using technical analysis and buy and sell them as each one appears to be doing well. Because I am trading in industry exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and not individual stocks, I feel comfortable looking at my positions once a week. My thought is that industries aren’t likely to experience sudden weaknesses not seen throughout the market in shorter time frames.

When I pay sufficient attention to the positions in my Roth IRA, I tend to get about or slightly above market-average performance. However, when I don’t look at my positions and re-balance regularly, I find that my performance suffers which just confirms my first point in the previous section that using technical analysis requires time and diligence.

[1] There are now TradersExpo events held regularly in many cities (subject to change by the coronavirus).

Should I Buy Stocks Now?

Should I Buy Stocks Now?

Many, if not most, financial advisers recommend accumulating wealth from a diversified set of investments including stocks.  An investor can add stocks to her/his portfolio by purchasing stocks from an individual company or from buying mutual funds.  With the stock market down double digits since the beginning of 2020, some experts say stocks are “on sale” and now is a good time to buy, but just over half of Americans report they own stocks. This is down from 62% prior to the 2007/8 recession and it includes ownership of stocks that are contained within retirement funds and mutual funds, as well as individual stocks.  Common reasons to not buy stocks/mutual funds are (1) stocks are complicated and I don’t know how to get started, and (2) stocks are too risky.  Let’s review both of these drawbacks.

Stocks are Complicated

All too often, some of my friends and family are reluctant to purchase stocks because they do not understand the stock market.   Even some of my most intelligent friends shy away from financial conversations that involve the stock market because they do not want to appear ignorant.

If you did not learn about investing in school or from your parents, how can you figure this out?  How do you convert your dollars into stocks?  How do you learn which stocks are worthwhile?  Should you purchase individual stocks or mutual funds and, by the way, what exactly are mutual funds?

Investment Clubs Help You Buy Stocks

You can learn about many of these topics in a fun way by forming an investment club with like-minded friends and/or family.  Since 2004, I have been a member of Take Stock, a ladies’ investment club.  Our club is one of the 4,000 investment clubs of the National Association of Investors Corp. (NAIC).  The NAIC was formed in 1951 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with the aim of teaching individuals how to become successful long-term investors.  Originally, the NAIC’s focus was investing in common stocks, but, with the popularity of 401(k)s and other retirement plans, the NAIC has added education about stock and bond mutual funds.

The NAIC (also more recently known as Better Investing) stresses four principles for successful, long-term investing:

  1. Invest regularly, regardless of market conditions;
  2. Reinvest all earnings;
  3. Invest in growth companies (and growth mutual funds); and
  4. Diversify to reduce risk.

What Information Can I Get from NAIC/BI?

NAIC/Better Investing (NAIC/BI) provides many tools and resources to help individuals as well as investment clubs learn about investing.  There is a stock selection guide (SSG) that organizes companies’ performance information to allow you to determine for yourself whether a particular company is a stock you want to purchase and the price is reasonable.  Some of the free resources offered by NAIC/BI include:

  • Over 100 free stock investing videos;
  • An introduction to stock investing that explains the SSG;
  • How to start your own investment club;
  • Investor education articles;
  • Stories from members; and
  • 90-day free membership.

How My Club Works

My club was formed in 1999. It is comprised of nine women who meet monthly in each other’s homes.  Of the nine members, the one with the longest tenure is a charter member and the most recent arrival has been in our club for just over one year.   During our meetings, we review our club’s portfolio (currently stocks of twelve companies), discuss stocks to research for possible future purchase, and vote on any companies that we have already researched. It is not required that you meet in members’ homes—you could choose to meet at your local library, a restaurant, etc.  We typically meet in the evening on the second Tuesday of each month and the hostess for that month provides a light meal.  Every July, we meet at a local park for a summer concert and we bring our families/friends.

Monthly “dues” are used to invest in stocks and your ownership is based upon what percentage of the total portfolio you have invested through your paid dues.  The monthly dues are in multiples of $25 (i.e., $25, $50, $75 etc.) and there is a monthly minimum of $25.

I highly recommend forming or joining an investment club.  You’ll have the opportunity to learn more about the stock market, to learn more about individual companies that you and your club research, and you’ll get to know your friends and acquaintances better.  The best part is you’ll have fun while investing in your financial well-being and you will all become richer by enhancing your friendship.

One Final Caveat

If you are new to investing you will probably want to invest the portion of your money that you will not need in the near term, such as a down payment on a home you wish to  purchase three or more years from now, your children’s education fund, or your retirement fund.  Your rainy-day fund should be kept in more liquid investments that can be accessed quickly.

So now that you know you can have fun and learn about the stock market, you may still be reluctant to buy stocks due to the risk involved.  Let’s review this objection to increasing your wealth. . .

Stocks Are Too Risky

One of the primary concerns about owning stocks is the risk inherent in these investments.  What if I invest my money in the stock market and the stock market crashes as we have seen since Covid-19 or like we saw in 2008/2009?  While it is true that declines of 15+% in your investment portfolio are not desirable, it is also true that in every case where the stock market has had a large decrease, the stock market more than made up for the declines in the months and years following the drop.

As of this writing (April 30, 2020), since the beginning of 2020, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (Dow) is down about 18% and the S&P 500 is down about 11%.   While not good news, if you were invested in the market during 2019, you would still be ahead because the Dow rose more in 2019 than the current 2020 drop. (Dow added 22% and the S&P 500 added 28% during 2019).

We have likely heard the old adage:  risk is reward. That is, the more reward that is sought, the more risk that must be taken.  If you are desirous of the smallest risk possible, then you would probably choose to park your money in (for example) savings bonds or certificates of deposit which will guarantee you a reward albeit a small one.  If you prefer more reward, then you will likely choose to invest some of your portfolio into the stock market.  Let’s look at an example of how a specific risk tolerance manifests into investment growth.

Risk-Reward Comparison

Five years ago, assume you invested $1,000 with (1) small risk (investing in a certificate of deposit), (2) medium risk (investing in an S&P 500 mutual fund) or (3) high risk (investing in only one individual stock).  Here are the results:

 

CD:  “low” riskS&P 500: “medium” riskAmerican: “high” riskApple:   “high” risk

5/1/15

 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000

 $1,000

12/31/19 $ 1,073 $1,531 $633

 $2,376

4/30/20

 $1,077 $1,395 $298

 $2,209

5-year return

7.7%39.5%-70.2%

120.9%

4.75-year return (through 12/31/19, 0pre-Covid)

7.3%

53.1%-36.7%

137.6%

 

Takeaways from this Exercise

Here are the key takeaways from this table.

  • The lowest-risk investment provides a 7.7% return over five years. This is based on investing $1,000 over a period of five years at current CD rates of 1.5% per year.  Note that while the original investment of $1,000 grows over the five years, it is growing less than the rate of inflation over the five years so you have “lost ground” by investing in a CD.    Over this same five-year period, the Consumer Price Index rose by 8.9%, higher than the 7.7% earned in the CD; thus, your buying power is less since the cost of goods has risen by 8.9% while your investment grew at 7.7%.
  • The medium-risk investment provides a much better return than low risk. You would have earned nearly 40% over the five-year period.
  • The high-risk investment was defined as investing in only one single stock. As you can see, if you chose American Airlines for your one stock, you would have lost 70% of your investment.  However, if you had chosen Apple as your one stock, you would have more than doubled your money and earned a 121% return over five years.

Keep in mind that the results above include the effects of the drop in the stock market from COVID-19.  If we look instead at year end 2019 — before the effects of COVID-19 — we see returns of 7.3% (CD), 53% (S&P 500), -37% (AAL), and 138% (AAPL).

Your Risk Appetite

If your risk appetite is miniscule, then you would probably want to avoid the stock market altogether and put your money into certificates of deposit.   This will not bring wealth to you but it will give you peace of mind.  If you have more tolerance for risk, then investing in the stock market by diversifying your stocks is a much better way to accumulate wealth.   As shown in the example above, it is possible to earn more from investing in high-growth stocks, but it is also virtually impossible to pick which individual stocks will generate above average future growth.  The medium-risk option will usually provide much better returns over the long terms than will the low risk-option.

How I Built My Wealth

Stocks—primarily mutual funds with a variety of individual stocks—have contributed to my personal wealth accumulation.  I recommend including stocks in your assets and joining or forming an investment club with friends and family can be a fun way to further your wealth.  Good luck!

 

Kay Rahardjo, FCAS, MAAA is an actuary and risk management professional. She retired from The Hartford in 2014 from her role as Senior Vice President and Chief Operational Risk Officer. She developed and taught an operational risk management course at Columbia University.

At What Price Should I Buy a Stock?

Deciding at what price to buy a stock or other security is almost as hard as deciding whether to buy the security at all.  There are many different approaches for deciding at what price to buy a stock.  One of the ones I’ve seen discussed most often is dollar-cost averaging.  Other strategies include (1) buying the position on whatever day you decide to buy it and (2) setting a target price that is below the current trading price, among many others.  In this post, I’ll explain and compare these three strategies.

Dollar-Cost Averaging

Dollar cost-averaging is a strategy for buying stocks that is intended to reduce the risk that you will “buy high.”

How it Works

Here are the key steps for implementing this strategy:

  • Identify the security you want to buy.
  • Determine how much money you have to invest in that security.
  • Divide that amount into equal increments. In the examples below, I have split the amount into four increments.
  • Decide over what time period you want to make your purchases. In the examples below, I have illustrated a purchasing time period of four weeks.
  • Invest one increment at points in time evenly spaced over your selected time period. For example, let’s say you want to invest over four weeks.  You might buy the selected security every Wednesday in four equal pieces.  If you have $1,000 to invest, you would buy $250 of the selected security each Wednesday for four weeks.

The underlying premise of this approach is that you buy more shares of the selected security than if you happened to have bought the security on a day that the price is high.  Specifically, because you are buying the security in equal dollar amounts, you will buy more shares when the price is low and fewer shares when the price is high.  As such, your average purchase price will be low.

Simple Example

Here’s a simple example in which you invest a total of $4,800 in increments of $1,200 a week for four weeks.

WeekStock PriceShares Purchased
1$10.00120
28.00150
312.00100
49.25130

In this example, you buy a total of 500 shares.  If you had bought all of your shares on at $10 (the first week price), you would have 480 shares ($4,800 / $10).  In this scenario, you will have 4% more shares ([500 – 480]/480 – 1) if you use dollar-cost averaging than if you bought all of your shares at the first week’s price.  4% more shares corresponds to 4% more money when you sell the security.  Although 4% may not sound like a large difference, it can add up over time as you buy and sell stocks.

To be clear, though, dollar-cost averaging isn’t always better.  If you had bought all of your shares at the Week 3 price of $8, you would have 600 shares or 20% more than if you used dollar-cost averaging.

Investing Strategies

Here are the three strategies for determining when to buy a security that I’ll use for illustration.

Strategy 1 – Invest Immediately

Invest all of your available money on the day you decide to make the purchase.

Strategy 2 – Dollar-Cost Averaging

Use dollar-cost averaging by buying ¼ of your money available on Wednesday of four consecutive weeks[1]. This strategy is similar to what happens when you buy securities in your employer-sponsored retirement account if you are paid weekly.  Every week, you employer takes some of your wages and invests it in the security you have selected.

Strategy 3 – Wait for Price Drop

Invest all of your available money after the stock price has dropped by 5%. Hold your money in cash while waiting for the price to decrease.

More Examples

I’ve created a few more simple examples to compare the strategies for deciding when to buy a security.  These examples are intentionally simple and therefore unrealistic.  Nonetheless, they are helpful in understanding the different strategies because of their simplicity.  In all of the examples, you have $1,000 to invest.

Smooth Increase

In the first scenario, the stock’s price goes up smoothly by 10% every year.  A graph of its price over two years would look like this.

The chart below focuses on the first month of the above chart and includes the purchases for Strategies 1 and 2 as dots.

Under Strategy 1 (big red dot), you buy all of your stock on the first day at $10 a share, so you are able to purchase 100 shares.

Under Strategy 2 (smaller green dots), you would buy $250 of stock on each of the first, eighth, fifteenth and twenty-second days.  The table below shows the prices on those days and the number of shares you buy.

DayPriceShares Bought
1$10.0025.00
810.0224.95
1510.0424.90
2210.0524.88

The total number of shares you buy is 99.73.

Under Strategy 3, you never buy the stock because the price never decreases by 5%.

The table below compares the numbers of share bought under each strategy

StrategyNameNumber Shares BoughtValue in Two Years
1Invest Immediately100.00$1,210
2Dollar-Cost Averaging99.731,203
3Wait for Price DropN/A1,000

In this scenario, there is very little difference between the first two strategies, though you will buy more shares if you invest immediately. Any time you delay your purchases in this scenario, you are certain to pay a higher price which reduces the number of shares you can buy.  Under Strategy 3, because the price never decreases, you never buy the stock, so end up with the same amount of money with which you started.

Smooth Check Mark

The second illustration is stock whose price goes down smoothly for six months and then increases for the next 18 months.  A graph of its price would look like this.

The chart below focuses on the first six months of the above chart and includes the purchases for all three strategies as dots.

Under Strategy 1 (big red dot), you buy all of your stock on the first day at $10 a share, so you are able to purchase 100 shares.

Under Strategy 2 (smaller green dots), you buy $250 of stock on each of the first, eighth, fifteenth and twenty-second days.  The table below shows the prices on those days and the number of shares you buy.

DayPriceShares Bought
1$10.0025.00
89.9825.05
159.9625.10
229.9425.15

The total number of shares you buy is 100.30.

Under Strategy 3, you buy 105.2 shares at $9.50 (5% below the initial price of $10) on day 177.

The table below compares the numbers of share bought under each strategy and the amount of money you will have at the end of two years.

StrategyNameNumber Shares BoughtValue in Two Years
1Invest Immediately100.0$1,097
2Dollar-Cost Averaging100.31,100
3Wait for Price Drop105.21,154

In this scenario, the best strategy is to wait until the price drops by 5% which happens to be the minimum price over the two-year period.  The results of the other two strategies are very similar, though investing all of your money on the first day is the worst choice, as you buy stock during the period in which the price has fallen under the other two strategies.

Bumpy Increase 1

Next, we will look at two illustrations of what a stock price might actually look like.  Here is a graph of the first illustration.

The chart below focuses on the first month of the above chart and includes the purchases for Strategies 1 and 2 as dots.

Under Strategy 1 (big red dot), you buy all of your stock on the first day at $10 a share, so you are able to purchase 100 shares.

Under Strategy 2 (smaller green dots), you would buy $250 of stock on each of the first, eighth, fifteenth and twenty-second days.  The table below shows the prices on those days and the number of shares you buy.

DayPriceShares Bought
1$10.0025.00
89.8325.43
159.8825.30
229.8025.51

The total number of shares you buy is 101.24.

Under Strategy 3, you don’t buy any shares because the price never falls by 5%.

The table below compares the numbers of share bought under each strategy

StrategyNameNumber Shares BoughtValue in Two Years
1Invest Immediately100.00$1,144
2Dollar-Cost Averaging101.241,158
3Wait for Price Drop0.001,000

In this scenario, the best strategy is to buy your stock using Dollar-Cost Averaging (Strategy 2), but only by a small amount compared to using the Invest Immediately strategy.  You will have 1% more money than if in you invest it all on the first day and 13% more money than if you wait for the price to drop.

Bumpy Increase 2

The second realistic illustration is exactly the same as the first one with the exception that, in the first month, the price bounces around a bit above the initial $10 price rather than just below it.  The chart below focuses on the first month for this illustration and includes the purchases for Strategies 1 and 2 as dots.

Under Strategy 1 (big red dot), you buy all of your stock on the first day at $10 a share, so you are able to purchase 100 shares.

Under Strategy 2 (smaller green dots), you would buy $250 of stock on each of the first, eighth, fifteenth and twenty-second days.  The table below shows the prices on those days and the number of shares you buy.

DayPriceShares Bought
1$10.0025.00
810.2124.49
159.8825.30
2210.3124.25

The total number of shares you buy is 99.04.

Under Strategy 3, you don’t buy any shares because the price never falls by 5%.

The table below compares the numbers of share bought under each strategy

StrategyNameNumber Shares BoughtValue in Two Years
1Invest Immediately100.01,144
2Dollar-Cost Averaging99.041,133
3Wait for Price Drop01,000

In this scenario, the best strategy is to use the Invest Immediately strategy (Strategy 1), but only by a small amount compared to Dollar-Cost Averaging.  You will have 1% more money than if in you use Dollar-Cost Averaging and 14% more money than if you wait for the price to drop.

More Realistic Examples

Now that you have a better understanding of the three different strategies, I’ll turn to even more realistic scenarios.

  • The first of these scenarios will use the actual returns on the S&P 500 from 1928 through early 2020. This scenario is likely to be relevant when you are considering an investment in an index fund.
  • The second scenario is intended to be similar to an investment in an individual stock. To create the example, I took the S&P 500 times series and doubled the volatility.[2]

The daily stock prices are illustrated in the graph below.

Investment Horizons

To illustrate the impact of the different strategies, I looked at three different time periods over which you might hold the stocks – one year, five years and ten years.  If you are young and hold a stock until you retire, such as I have with some of the stocks I own, you might own the stock for 30 or 40 years.  I didn’t feel there was enough data available in the above time series to look at the impact on owning securities for more than ten years.  So, if you think you will be a very long-term investor, you will want to focus on the ten-year results.  Also, these analyses are not helpful to people who plan to own stocks over very short periods of time, such as some traders who might buy and sell a security in the same day.

Comparison of Realistic Results

The table below compares how much money you would have, on average across all possible starting dates for which data were available, at the end of each of the three time periods if you used each of the three strategies to buy $1,000 of an S&P 500 index fund.

StrategyOne YearFive YearsTen Years
Invest Immediately1,0741,3721,873
Dollar-Cost Averaging1,0741,3731,877
Wait for Price Drop1,0221,1811,485

 

The table below compares how much money you would have, on average, at the end of each of the three time periods if you used each of the three strategies to buy $1,000 of the illustrative stock.

StrategyOne YearFive YearsTen Years
Invest Immediately1,0871,3761,875
Dollar-Cost Averaging1,0871,3791,880
Wait for Price Drop1,0771,3301,772

 

Dollar-Cost Averaging vs. Invest Immediately

For both the S&P 500 and the illustrative stock, there are only very small differences (less than 0.3% for the one-year investment horizon and less than 1.3% for the longer investment horizons) in the average amount of money at the end of each of one, five and ten year between the Dollar-Cost Averaging and Invest Immediately strategies.

Wait for Price Drop

On the other hand, there is a larger difference between the average amount of money at the end of the three time periods if you use the Wait for Price Drop strategy and the average amount using either of the other two strategies.  For the S&P 500, you will have between 5% and 20% less money, on average, if you use the Wait for Price Drop strategy than if you use the Invest Immediately strategy, depending on your investment horizon.

For the more volatile illustrative stock, you will have between 1% and 5% less money, on average, if you use the Wait for Price strategy than if you use the Invest Immediately strategy.  With the higher volatility of the illustrative stock, it is more likely to have a 5% price drop.  There are therefore fewer scenarios in which you don’t get any investment return than there are using the S&P 500 prices.  As such, there is a smaller difference between the results of the Wait for Price Drop strategy and the other strategies for a more volatile security than for a more stable one.

Key Takeaways

As can be seen, the best strategy depends on the pattern and volatility of the security’s price.  Briefly:

  • For securities that have fairly smooth trends, there isn’t a lot of difference between the Invest Immediately and Dollar-Cost Averaging strategies.
  • For securities with more volatile prices, such as the two Bumpy Increase scenarios, the choice between the Dollar-Cost Averaging and Invest Immediately strategies can be a bit larger. However, there isn’t one that is better in all situations – Dollar-Cost Averaging was better in Bumpy Increase 1 while Invest Immediately was better in Bumpy Increase 2.  Because you can’t know whether your security’s price will follow a pattern closer to Bumpy Increase 1 or Bumpy Increase 2, neither strategy is preferred.
  • If you think that the price of the stock might trend down somewhat significantly or has a lot of volatility allowing the price to be significantly lower than the current price, waiting for a 5% (or other value you select) price decrease (Strategy 3) could be the best strategy. The drawback of this strategy is that there are a lot of scenarios in which you will never buy the security and then will get no return.

What Do I Do?

With all this information, you might wonder what I do.  I first need to provide a little background about my current investing situation, as it is likely to be different from yours.

I am retired, so am starting to spend my investments.  As such, I have a shorter investment horizon than I did when I was younger and in the saving mode.  I have a number of stocks and a few mutual funds that I have owned for many, many years and do very little trading of those positions.

Another portion of my money is in sector funds (index funds that focus on one segment of the economy, such as industrial companies, healthcare or technology) and a few large companies.  I tend to hold those securities for six months to two years.  The securities I am trading are closer in nature to the S&P 500 time series than even the hypothetical company with twice the volatility as the S&P 500.  As such, the Wait for Price Drop strategy doesn’t work for me.

With the very small differences between the Dollar-Cost Averaging and Invest Immediately strategies, I choose the Invest Immediately strategy because it is easier.  I have to place only one buy order instead of several orders.

Limit and Market Orders

As discussed in my post on stocks, there are different types of orders you can place when you want to buy a stock.  I always place limit orders.  A limit order allows me to buy a stock from the first person who wants to sell it to me at the price I have stated in the order.

The other type of order is a market order.  If you place a market order, you don’t get to set the price.  You buy the stock at whatever price it is trading at the moment you place the order.

There are risks to both types of orders.  If you place a market order and the price jumps up, you will buy the stock at the higher price.  If you place a limit order for a price below the current market price, you might never buy it similar to the Wait for Price Drop strategy.

A Compromise

To avoid the risk that I might buy a stock at a significantly higher price than I intend, I place a limit order with a limit that is about half way between the closing price and the low price from the previous day.  (I almost always place my orders over the weekend, so don’t have “up-to-the-minute” prices.)  This difference is often between 0.5% and 1% of the price.  By taking this strategy, I get a very small boost to my return by setting my limit below the market price but with very little risk that I won’t buy the stock because I have chosen the limit amount to be within a single day’s trading range.  The additional 0.5% to 1% doesn’t sound like a lot, but if I am able to increase my total return by that amount every year or two, it compounds quickly.

 

[1] There is nothing special about once a week for four weeks.  I did some testing of once a day for five days and found that there wasn’t a lot of difference in the number of shares bought, on average across a wide range of scenarios, from what the number using once a week for four weeks.  I also did some testing of what happens when you buy shares once a month for a year.  Across a wide range of realistic scenarios, you own fewer shares on average if you spread your purchases over a year as you purchase securities that you think will increase in price.  If the price of the security increases over the year, you will buy some of your shares at the higher price and own fewer shares.

 

 

[2] This note explains the nitty gritty details of how I adjusted the S&P 500 time series to create the second scenario.  I calculated the 200-day moving average of the daily closing prices of the S&P 500 from 1928 to early 2020.  The deviation is the actual closing price minus the moving average.  I doubled this deviation and added it back to the moving average to simulate prices for the hypothetical stock.

Don’t Panic! Just Plan It.

Don't Panic. Just Plan it.

Financial markets have been more turbulent in the past few weeks than has been seen in many years, probably more volatile than has happened since many of you started being financially aware. You may be wondering what actions you should take. With the sense of panic and urgency surrounding recent news, it often feels as if drastic action is necessary. If you have created financial plan, inaction may be the best strategy for you!

As indicated elsewhere on this blog, I do not have any professional designations that qualify me to provide professional advice. In addition, my comments are provided as generalities and may not apply to your specific situation. Please read the rest of this post with these thoughts in mind.

Biggest Financial Risk from Recent News

I suspect that losing your job or losing business if you are self-employed is the biggest financial risk many of you face. Understanding your position within your company and how your company will be impacted by coronavirus, oil prices and other events will inform you as to the extent to which you face the risk of a lay-off or reduction in hours/salary.

If you think you might have a risk of a decrease in earned income, you’ll want to look into what options for income replacement are available to you, including state or federal unemployment programs, severance from your employers, among others. Another important step is to review your expenses so you know how you can reduce them to match your lowered income.  In addition, you’ll want to evaluate how long you can live before exhausting your emergency savings, with or without drastic reductions in your expenses. You may even want to start cutting expenses before your income is lowered and put the extra amount in your emergency savings.

Your Financial Plan & Recent News

In the rest of this post, I’ll look at the various components of a financial plan and provide my thoughts on how they might be impacted by the recent news and resulting volatility in financial markets. For more tips on how to handle financial turmoil, check out these mistakes to avoid.

Paid Time-Off Benefits/Disability Insurance

If you are unfortunate enough to get COVID-19 or are required to self-quarantine and can’t work from home, you may face a reduction in compensation. Your first line of defense is any sick time or paid time-off (PTO) provided by your employer. In most cases, your employer will cover 100% of your wages for up to the number of days, assuming you haven’t used them yet.

Once you have used all of your sick time/PTO, you may have coverage under short- or long-term disability insurance if provided by your employer or if you purchase it through your employer or on your own. Disability insurance generally pays between 2/3 and 100% of your wages while you are unable to work for certain causes, almost always including illness. It might be a good time to review your available sick time/PTO and disability insurance to understand what coverage you have.

Emergency Savings

Emergency savings is one of the most important components of a financial plan.  There are two aspects to your emergency savings that you’ll want to consider. The first is whether you have enough in your emergency savings.  The second is the risk that the value of the savings will go down due to financial market issues.

Do I Have Enough?

If you are laid off, have reduced hours or use up all, exhaust your sick time/PTO or get less than 100% of your wages replaced by disability insurance, you may have to tap into your emergency savings. The need to spend your emergency savings increases if you tend to spend most of your paycheck rather than divert a portion of it to savings.

I generally suggest one to six months of expenses as a target for the amount of emergency savings. In light of recent events and the increased risks lay-off and illness, I would focus on the higher end of that range or even longer. As you evaluate the likelihood you’ll be laid off, the chances you’ll be exposed to coronavirus and your propensity to get it, you’ll also want to consider whether you have enough in emergency savings to cover your expenses while your income is reduced or eliminated.

In certain situations, such as in response to the coronavirus, creditors will allow you to defer your payments.  You will then have the option as to whether to defer them or make those payments from your emergency savings./a>

Will it Lose Its Value?

I’ve suggested that you keep at least one month of expenses in emergency savings in a checking or savings account at a bank or similar financial institution. The monetary value of your emergency savings is pretty much risk-free, at least in the US. The only way you would lose any of these savings is if the financial institution were to go bankrupt. In the US, deposits in financial institutions are insured, generally up to $250,000 per person per financial institution, by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). For more specifics, see the FDIC web site. Similar protections may be available in other countries.

I’ve also suggested that you keep another two to five months of expenses in emergency savings in something only slightly less accessible, such as a money market account. There is slightly more risk that the value of a money market account will go down than a checking or savings account, but it is generally considered to be very small. Money market accounts are also insured by the FDIC. For more specifics, see this article on Investopedia.

As such, the recent volatility in financial markets are unlikely to require you to take action related to your existing emergency savings and could act as an opportunity to re-evaluate whether you have enough set aside for emergencies.

Short-Term Savings

Another component of a financial plan is short-term savings.  Short-term savings is money you set aside for a specific purpose. One purpose for short-term savings is expenses that don’t get paid every month, such as property taxes, homeowners insurance or car maintenance and repairs.   Another purpose for short-term savings is to cover the cost of larger purchases for which you might need to save for several years, such as a car or a down payment on a house.

Short-term savings are commonly held in money-market accounts, certificates of deposits (CDs) or very high quality, shorter term bonds, such as those issued by the US government. CDs and US government bonds held to maturity are generally considered to have very little risk. Their market values are unlikely to change much and the likelihood that the issuers will not re-pay the principal when due is small.

Thus, the recent volatility in financial markets is also unlikely to require you to take action related to your short-term savings.

Long-Term Savings

Savings for retirement and other long-term goals are key components of a financial plan.  If they are invested at all in any equity markets, your long-term savings have likely taken quite a beating. Rather than try to provide generic guidance on how to deal with the losses in your long-term savings, I’ll tell you how I’m thinking and what I’m doing about mine. By providing a concrete example, albeit one very different from most of your situations, my goal is to provide you with some valuable insights about the thought process.

Think about the Time Frame for My Long-Term Savings

As you may know, I’m retired and have just a little income from consulting. As such, my financial plan anticipates that I will live primarily off my investments and their returns. I have enough cash and bonds to cover my expenses for several years. As such, I’m not in a position that I absolutely have to liquidate any of my equity positions in less than three-to-four years.

For many of you, your most significant goal for long-term savings is likely retirement. As such, your time horizon for your long-term savings is longer than mine and you can withstand even more volatility. That is, you have a longer time for stock prices to recover to the recent highs and even higher.     In the final section of this post, I’ll talk about how long it has taken equity markets to recover from past “crashes” to help you get more perspective on this issue.

Know Your Investments

My view is that, if I wait long enough, the overall stock market will recover. It always has in the past. If it doesn’t, I suspect something cataclysmic will have happened and I will be focused on more important issues such as food, water and heat, than my long-term savings. For now, though, my view is that my investments in broad-based index funds are going to recover from the recent price drops though it may take a while and be a tough period until then. As such, I am not taking any action with respect to those securities. Once the stock market seems to settle down a bit (and possibly not until it starts going up for a while), I might invest a bit more of my cash to take advantage of the lower prices.

I have a handful of investments in stocks and bonds of individual companies. These positions have required a bit more thought on my part.   I already know the primary products and services of these companies and the key factors that drive profitability, as I identified these features before I purchased the stocks or bonds as part of my financial plan. I can now look at the forces driving the economic changes to evaluate how each of the companies might be impacted.

Example 1

I own some bonds that mature in two to three years in a large company that provides cellular phone service. As discussed in my post on bonds, as long as you hold bonds to maturity, the only risk you face is that the issuer will default (not make interest payments or re-pay the principal). With the reduction in travel and group meetings, I see an increased demand for technological communication solutions, such as cell phones. While the stock price of this company has gone down, I don’t see that its chance of going bankrupt has been affected adversely, so don’t plan to sell the bonds.

Example 2

One company whose stock I’ve owned for a very long time focuses on products used to test food safety. While the company’s stock price has dropped along with the broader market, I anticipate that people will have heightened awareness of all forms of ways of transmitting illness, including through food-borne bacteria and other pathogens. As such, I am not planning to sell this stock as the result of recent events.

Example 3

I own stock in an airline that operates primarily within North America. This one is a bit trickier. It looks like travel of all types is going to be down for a while. I’m sure that US domestic airline travel will be significantly impacted, but suspect it will not be affected as much as international or cruise ship travel. The reduction in revenue might be slightly offset by the lower cost of fuel, but that is probably not a huge benefit in the long term.

I’ve owned this company for so long that I still have a large capital gain and would have to pay tax on it if I sold the stock. At this point, I don’t think there is a high probability that this airline will go bankrupt (though I’m not an expert and could be wrong). I expect the price to drop more than the overall market average in the coming months, but also expect that it will recover. As such, I don’t plan to sell this stock solely because of recent events.   However, if this company had most of its revenue from operating cruise ships, was smaller, or had more foreign exposure, I would study its financials and business model in more detail to see if I thought it would be able to withstand the possibility of much lower demand for an extended period of time.

Summary

I have gone through similar thought processes for each of the companies in my portfolio to create my action plan. I will re-evaluate them as time passes and more information becomes available.

What We Can Learn from Past Crashes

Although every market cycle is different, I thought it might be insightful to provide information about previous market crashes. For this discussion, I am defining a market crash as a decrease in the price of the S&P 500 by more than 20% from its then most recent peak. I have identified 11 crashes using this definition, including the current one, over the time period from 1927 to March 14, 2020.

As you’ll see in the graphs below, the market crash starting at the peak in August 1929 is much different from most of the others. It took until 1956 before the S&P 500 reached its pre-crash level! Over the almost three years until the S&P 500 reached its low and then again during the recovery period (from the low until it reached its previous high), there were several crashes. I have counted this long cycle as a single crash, though it could be separated into several.

Magnitude of Previous Crashes

The table below shows the dates of the highest price of the S&P 500 before each of the 11 crashes since 1927.  It also shows the percentage decrease from the high to the low and the number of years from the high to the low.

Date of Market Peak

Price ChangeYears from High to Low

9/17/29

-86%2.7

8/3/56

-21%

1.2

12/13/61-28%

0.5

2/10/66-22%

0.7

12/2/68

-36%

1.5

1/12/73

-48%1.7

12/1/80

-27%1.7

8/26/87

-34%

0.3

3/27/00-49%

2.5

10/10/07-57%

1.4

2/20/20-27%

0.1

While they don’t happen all that often, this table confirms that the S&P 500 has suffered significant decreases in the past. What seems a bit different about the current crash is the speed at which prices have dropped from the market high reached just a few weeks ago. In the past, the average time from the market peak to the market bottom has been 1.4 years, but the range has been from 0.3 years to 2.7 years. While the 27% decrease in the S&P 500 from its peak on February 20, 2020 until March 14, 2020 is large and troubling, the average price change of 10 preceding crashes is -41% (-36% if the 1929 crash is excluded). As such, it isn’t unprecedented.

What Happened Next?

This table shows how long it took after each of the first 10 crashes for the S&P 500 to return to its previous peak. It also shows the average annualized return from the lowest price until it returned to its previous peak.

Date of Market Peak

Years from Low Back to PeakAnnualized Average Return During Recovery

9/17/29

22.29.3%

8/3/56

0.929.8%
12/13/611.2

31.7%

2/10/660.6

55.3%

12/2/681.8

28.3%

1/12/73

5.812.0%

12/1/80

0.2293.4%

8/26/87

1.6

28.1%

3/27/004.6

15.7%

10/10/074.1

22.9%

For example, it took 1.6 years after the market low price on December 4, 1987 (the low point of the cycle starting on August 26, 1987) for the S&P 500 to reach the same price it had on August 26, 1987. Over that 1.6-year period, the average annual return on an investment in the S&P 500 would have been 28%!

Because the values from the 1929 and 1980 cycles can distort the averages, I’ll look at the median values of these metrics. At the median, it took 1.7 years for the S&P 500 to reach its previous high with a median annualized average return of 28%.   There are obviously wide ranges about these metrics, but, excluding the 1929 crash, the S&P 500 never took more than 6 years to recover from its low. This time frame is important as you are thinking about the length of time until you might need to use your long-term savings.

After hitting bottom, the S&P 500 always had an average annual return of 12% or more over the recovery period, a fair amount higher than the overall annual average return on the S&P 500. Anyone who sold a position in the S&P 500 at any of the low points missed the opportunity to earn these higher-than-average returns – a reminder to not panic.

From Crash to Recovery

The graph below shows the ratios of the price of the S&P 500 to the price at the peak (day 0) over the 30 years after each of the first 10 market peaks in the tables above.

The light blue line that stays at the bottom is the 1929 crash. As you can see, by 30 years later, the S&P 500 was only twice as high as it was at its pre-crash peak. For all of the other crashes, the S&P 500 was at least four times higher than at each pre-crash peak, even though in many cases there were subsequent crashes in the 30-year period.

To get a sense for how the current crash compares, the graph below shows the same information for only the first 100 days after each peak. The current crash is represented by the heavy red line.

As indicated above, one of the unique characteristics about the current crash is that it occurred so quickly after the peak. The graph shows that the bright red line is much lower than any of the other lines on day 17. However, if you look at the light blue line (after the peak on September 17, 1929) and the brown line (after the peak on August 26, 1987), you can see that there were similarly rapid price decreases as occurred in the current crash, but they started a bit longer after their respective peaks.

Current Crash

We can’t know the path that the stock market will take going forward in the current cycle. It could halt its downward trend in a few days to a week and return to set new highs later this year. On the other hand, if other events occur in the future (such as the weather conditions that led to the dust bowl in the 1930s and World War II in the 1940s that exacerbated the banking issues that triggered the 1929 crash), it is possible stock prices could decline for many years and take a long time to recovery. Based on the patterns observed, this trend is less likely, but it is still a possibility.

As such, it is important as you consider your situation that you look at your investment horizon, your ability to live with further decreases in stock prices and your willingness to forego the opportunity to earn higher-than-average returns when the stock market returns to its pre-crash levels if you sell now, among other things.

Closing Thoughts

My goal in writing this post was to provide you with insights on how to view the disruptions in the economy and financial markets in recent weeks and plan your responses to them. My primary messages are:

  1. Don’t panic. While significant action may be the best course for your situation, do your best to make well-reasoned and not emotional decisions. Although you might want to sell your investments right away to avoid additional decreases in value, it isn’t the best strategy for everyone.
  2. Stick with (or make) a financial plan. Having a financial plan provides you with the ability to look at the impact of the uncertainties in financial markets and the overall economy on each aspect of your financial future separately, making the decision-making process a little easier.

 

Mutual Funds and ETFs

Mutual-Funds-and-ETFs

Mutual fund and ETFs (exchange-traded funds) allow you to invest in securities without having to select individual positions. Instead, the fund manager makes the decisions as to when to buy and sell each security. As such, a fund is an easy way for new or busy investors to participate in financial markets. This post will help you learn about the different types of funds, their pros and cons and other considerations of owning mutual funds and ETFs.

What is a Mutual Fund?

A mutual fund is pool of money collected from the investors in the fund. The investors own shares in the mutual fund itself, but not in the individual securities owned by the fund. However, other than closed-end funds discussed below, an investor’s return is his or her share of the returns of the aggregation of the returns of the individual securities owned by the mutual fund. That is, if, on average, the securities in the mutual fund issue dividends of 3% and appreciate by 2%, fund owners will receive a dividend distribution equal to 3% of the value of their share of the pool plus the value of their ownership share will increase by 2%.

Most mutual funds also issue capital gain distributions once or twice a year. If the mutual fund had a gain on the aggregate amount of securities sold in the year, it will often distribute the amount of the gain to investors as a capital gain distribution in proportion to their ownership shares in the pool.

Mutual funds can be purchased directly from the fund manager or through a broker. Most mutual funds are not traded on exchanges. Purchases and sales of mutual funds occur once a day, with all buyers and sellers receiving the same price which is equal to the net asset value of the underlying assets. (See below for more information and exceptions.)

What is an ETF?

Exchange-traded funds or ETFs have several characteristics in common with mutual funds:

  • They are pools of money collected from their investors.
  • Investors share in the returns of the aggregation of the individual securities.
  • ETFs can hold a wide range of securities, including stocks, bonds and commodities.

These are a few of the ways in which ETFs differ from mutual funds:

  • They are exchange-traded securities (as implied by their name), so they can be bought and sold any time the exchange is open. As such, the price you pay or receive when you buy or sell an ETF can vary over the course of a day.
  • While many mutual funds have a minimum investment requirement, most ETFs do not.

Types of Mutual Funds and ETFs

There are many features of mutual funds and ETFs that are important in determining the best funds for your portfolio. Almost all of these features apply to both mutual funds and ETFs.

Active vs. Passive Management

An actively managed fund has a fund manager who is responsible for selecting the securities that will be owned by the fund. The manager decides when to buy and sell each security.  By comparison, the securities owned by a passively managed fund are determined so that the performance of the fund tracks a certain basket of assets.

Index funds are a common type of passively managed funds.   An index fund is a mutual fund or ETF that has a goal of matching the performance of an index, such as the S&P 500, the Dow Jones Industrial Average or the Fidelity US Bond Index.

There are other passively managed funds whose trades are determined so as to produce returns similar to a certain segment of a market, such as a particular industry or region of the world, that may or may not have an index that measures those returns.

Securities Owned

Funds can own a wide variety of securities – everything from stocks and bonds to commodities, among others. As you are looking for a fund, you’ll want to decide what type of security you are seeking.

Geography

Most funds focus on a specific geography. Many mutual funds focus on US investments, while others purchase securities from within a region of the US, the whole world or segments thereof, such as the developed world excluding the US. While I hold most of my North American equity positions in individual companies, I use mutual funds to diversify my portfolio globally.

Market Segment

Just as funds focus on a specific geography, they sometimes invest in one or more market segments.   Some funds focus on a specific industry, such as natural resources or technology or financial companies. If you think a particular industry is going to benefit from trends in the economy, such as healthcare as the population ages, you might want to buy a fund that focuses on the healthcare industry. On the other hand, you might want to avoid healthcare stocks if you think that the healthcare industry might be at risk of significant disruption from changes in the government’s role in healthcare.

Other funds focus on the size of companies.  For example, an S&P 500 Index fund only buys positions in companies in the S&P 500 which, by definition, are large.  Other funds focus on middle-sized companies (middle-sized capitalization of mid-cap) or smaller companies (small-cap).

Another “industry” on which many funds focus is municipal bonds. These funds invest in bonds issued by municipalities. In many cases, interest from municipal bonds and municipal bond funds is not taxed by the Federal government or in the state in which the municipality is located. For example, if you buy a bond issued by the City of Baltimore, it is likely that it will not be taxed at all if you are a Maryland resident.

Appreciation vs. Dividends

Some funds focus on high-dividend investments, while others focus on appreciation in the value of the securities they own. You can learn the focus of a fund by looking at its details either in a summary or its prospectus. Funds that focus on high-dividend yields often have “high-dividend” in their name, but not always. The type of return targeted by funds you purchase will impact the specific securities owned by the fund. In addition, the type of return impacts the taxes you will pay (discussed below).

Growth vs. Value

Companies are often categorized between growth and value, reflecting the two primary reasons that stock prices increase. The stock price of a growth company is expected to increase because the company will increase its profits. By comparison, the stock price of value company is expected to grow because its valuation, often measured by the price-to-earnings or P/E ratio, is considered low and likely to return to normal.

Closed-end vs. Open-end Funds

Most funds are open-end funds. The price you pay for these funds is equal to the market value of the securities owned by the fund divided by the number of shares outstanding.   This price is known as the Net Asset Value. You can buy shares from and sell shares back to the fund owner at any time at the net asset value.

A closed-end fund differs in that the number of shares available is fixed when the fund is first created. When you buy and sell shares in a closed-end fund, the other party to the transaction is another investor, not the fund owner.  In fact, closed-end fund shares trade in the same manner as if the fund were a company. As such, the price is not the net asset value, but rather has a market value that reflects not only the net asset value but also investors views of the future performance of the fund.

I found Investopedia to have some great information about open-end funds and closed-end funds.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Mutual Funds and ETFs

The biggest advantage of mutual funds and ETFs is the ease with which you can diversify your portfolio, especially in asset classes or market segments with which you are unfamiliar. I think index-based ETFs are a terrific way for new investors to participate in markets. As I mentioned above, I use mutual funds for international stocks, as I don’t know enough about economies and market conditions outside the US, much less about individual companies, to make informed buying decisions.

A drawback to actively-managed funds is that they tend to underperform the market. That is, there are not many money managers who can consistently produce returns that exceed their target benchmarks. This difference is even greater when returns are reduced for fees paid by investors (discussed later in this post).

There are many sources for statistics about mutual fund returns. CNBC states that, in every one of the nine years from 2010 through 2018, more than half of actively managed large-cap funds produced returns less than the S&P 500. The same article also indicates that 85% of those funds underperformed the S&P 500 over a ten-year period and 92% underperformed over a 15-year period. As such, care should be taken when investing in actively managed funds. If you are looking for funds that will produce returns similar to broad market indices, such as the S&P 500, an index fund might be a better choice.

Income Taxes

There are four types of returns that are taxed when you own mutual funds or ETFs that hold stocks or bonds held in taxable accounts. Funds held in tax-deferred or tax-free accounts will have different tax treatment. The taxable returns on other types of funds will depend on the types of returns generated by the underlying assets.

Capital Gains

When you sell your ownership position in a fund, the difference between the amount you paid when you bought it and the amount you received when you sell it is a capital gain.   The taxation of short-term capital gains (related to securities owned for less than one year) is somewhat complicated in the US. Long-term capital gains are taxed in the same manner as dividends in the US, at 15% for most people. In Canada, capital gains are taxed at 50% of the rate that applies to your wages.

Interest

When you own a bond fund, interest paid by the issuers of the bonds owned by the fund is taxable in the year the interest payment was made. In the US and Canada, interest held in taxable accounts is taxed at the same rate as wages, except for certain municipal and government bonds which may be exempt from state or Federal taxes.

Dividends

Dividends paid by companies owned by a fund are taxable in the year the dividends payments are made. For most people in the US, there is a 15% Federal tax on dividends from investments held in a taxable account plus any state taxes. In Canada, dividends are taxed at the same rate as wages.

Capital Gain Distributions

Over the course of a year, a mutual fund may sell some of its assets. The capital gains earned from those assets are distributed to owners as capital gain distributions. Capital gain distributions are taxed in the same manner as capital gains.

Fees

There are generally three types of fees that can affect your returns on ETFs and mutual funds: front-end loads, operating expenses and commissions. Schwab identifies two other hidden costs that are a bit more obscure, so I’ll refer you to its post on this topic if you want more information.

Front-End Loads

Some mutual funds require you to pay a fee when you make a purchase. The fee is usually a percentage of your investment. For example, you would pay $10 for every $1,000 you invest in a fund with a 1% front-end load. If you purchased this fund, its total return on the underlying investments would need to be 1% higher over the entire period over which you owned it than the same fund with no front-end load for you to make an equivalent profit.

Funds that don’t have a front-end load are called no-load funds.

Operating Expenses

Mutual funds and ETFs, even those that are passively managed, have operating expenses. The operating expenses are taken out of the pool of money provided by investors. Every fund publishes its annual operating expense load, so you can compare them across funds. Funds with higher expense loads need to have higher returns on the underlying investments than fund with lower expense loads every year for you to make an equivalent return.

ETFs tend to have much lower operating expense loads than mutual funds. Similarly, passive funds tend to have lower operating expense loads than actively managed funds.

Commissions

If you purchase a mutual fund or ETF through a broker, you may pay a commission both when you buy the fund and when you sell it. A commission is a fee paid to the broker for the service it provides allowing you to buy and sell securities. Many brokers have recently reduced or eliminated commissions on many ETFs. If you purchase the mutual fund or ETF directly from the fund manager, you will not pay a commission.

Dividend Reinvestment

Many funds allow you to automatically reinvest distributions (i.e., interest, dividends and capital gain distributions). Although it includes all types of distributions, it is often called dividend reinvesting or reinvestment. It is a great way to ensure that all of your returns stay invested, as you don’t have to keep track of the payment dates on any distributions so you can reinvest them.

I have a few cautions about dividend reinvestment.

First, you want to reevaluate your choice of fund periodically. If you blindly reinvest all of your dividends and something changes that makes the fund a poor fit for your portfolio, automatic dividend reinvestment will cause you to have more money invested in something that you don’t want.

Second, you’ll want to be aware of the tax implications of dividend reinvestment – one of which is helpful and one of which requires some care – if you hold the fund in a taxable account.

Increased Cost Basis

As indicated above, when you sell a fund, you pay capital gains tax on the difference between your proceeds on sale and what you paid for the fund. The distributions that you reinvest are considered part of what you paid for the fund. You’ll need to take care to keep track of the amounts you’ve reinvested, as they increase your cost basis (the amount you paid) and decrease your capital gains tax.

Taxes on Distributions

Even if you reinvest your distributions, you need to pay taxes on them in the year in which they were paid. As such, if 100% of your distributions are automatically reinvested, you’ll need to have cash available from another source to pay the income taxes on the distributions.

Selecting Mutual Funds and ETFs

There are thousands of mutual funds and ETFs from which to choose. Here are my thoughts on how you can get started.

Set your Goals

  1. Determine what type of fund you are seeking. Are you trying to focus on a small niche or the broader market?
  2. Narrow down the type of fund that will meet your needs. Do you want an actively managed fund or a passive one? Are you interested in an open end or closed end fund?  Do you want the fund to look for growth companies or those with low valuations?

Identify Some Funds

  1. Once you’ve narrowed down the type of fund you’d like, you can use a screener to help you further narrow down your choices. Most large brokerage firms, as well as many independent entities, have mutual fund and ETF screeners. For example, Morningstar, a global investment-research and investment-services firm, has a free screener (after you sign up at no charge) at this link.
  2. Look at the ratings of the funds that are identified. The entity assigning the ratings usually expects higher rated funds to perform better than lower rated funds.
  3. Look at the historical returns. While past performance is never a guarantee of future performance, funds that have done well in the past and have consistent management and strategy may do well in the future.
  4. Read the details of the fund either on the fund manager’s web site or in the prospectus. Look to see if the objectives of the fund are consistent with your objectives. Make sure the types of securities the manager can purchase are in line with what you would like to buy. The names of some funds can be much narrower than the full range of securities the manager is allowed to buy. Find out if the fund management and objectives have been stable over time. Some funds can change their objectives on fairly short notice, potentially exposing you to risks you may not want to take or lower expected returns that you desire. To learn more about reading a prospectus, check out the article on Page 9 of this on-line magazine.
  5. Compare the fees among the funds on your list. If the underlying assets are similar and are expected to produce the same returns, funds with lower fees are more likely to provide you with higher returns (after expenses) than funds with higher fees. Don’t forget to look at both front-end loads and annual operating expense ratios.
  6. Select a strategy for buying your mutual funds or ETFs, such as dollar-cost averaging, waiting for a price drop or buying at the market price.

Make a Decision

  1. Buy a position in the fund(s) that best fit your requirements. As indicated above, you can buy most funds either through a broker (which can sometimes add a commission to your expenses) or directly from the fund manager.
  2. Last, but not least, be sure to monitor your positions to make sure that the fund objectives, holdings, management and fees remain consistent with your objectives.

Picking Stocks

Many investors create their own portfolios by picking stocks in individual companies. As discussed in my post on the basics of stocks, picking stocks in individual companies is one of several strategies for creating an investment portfolio. Alternatives to picking stocks in individual companies include buying mutual funds and exchange-traded funds. I’ll talk about those strategies in another post.

When I first started investing in the early 1980s, mutual funds were quite common but index funds and exchange-traded funds, while they existed, were not well known. I started my investment story by picking stocks in individual companies. One of the best books I’ve ever read on investing is One Up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch, originally published in 1989.

Confirmation of Independence: I have no affiliation with the author or publisher of the book I am reviewing. I do not receive any compensation for recommending it or if you purchase it.     I truly think it is a great source of investing information.

Lynch was the manager of a very successful mutual fund, the Fidelity Magellan fund, from 1977 to 1990. During that time, the fund had a 29.3% annual average return or more than twice the average return on the S&P 500 over the same time period. If you are considering picking stocks in individual companies, I recommend his book even though it is quite dated. It references companies and trends with which you may not be familiar, but the fundamental concepts are still relevant and it is a quick, easy read.

In this post, I’ll essentially provide an overview of some of the key points I learned from One Up on Wall Street and illustrate them with some personal examples when I can.

Picking Stocks in Companies You Know

One of the first concepts that Lynch introduces is that you are your own local expert. You are familiar with the business in which you work and shop. You are a consumer and you can observe trends in the area in which you live. By watching the world around you, you can identify possible investment opportunities, possibly even before the “market” or “experts” discover them. In many cases, if you identify a trend very early and invest in a company that will benefit from it, you can earn a much-higher-than-market-average return on your investment. In fact, Lynch points to this opportunity as giving individual investors a better chance of beating the market than professional investors who have to invest larger amounts so tend to purchase more mature companies.

Our Kids’ Choices

To illustrate what I mean by “invest in what you know,” I will use an experience we had with our children as an example. When they were in their early teens (probably around 2004 or 2005), we gave them each a very small amount of money to invest. Our son, who was very interested in trains and large equipment, chose the following companies:

  • Microsoft
  • John Deere
  • Canadian Pacific Railway
  • Canadian National Railway
  • ASV – a company that makes skid-steer loaders.

Our daughter, who was much more aware of what was happening in the retail space, chose the following companies:

  • Apple
  • Nordstrom
  • JC Penney
  • Target
  • One other company that I don’t recall.

How it Turned Out

I don’t remember exactly when we started this exercise, so have looked at the two- and five-year average annual returns starting on January 1, 2006. By using two-year returns, I have excluded the impact of the market decline in 2008 and early 2009. The five-year returns go through December 31, 2010, so include the market decline and part of the recovery.

The S&P 500 averaged a 4.5% increase per year during the two-year period and was essentially flat for the five-year period. By comparison, my daughter’s stocks increased at an annual average rate of 9% over the two-year period and 8% over the five-year period. My son did even better, with annual average returns of 15% over the two-year period and 9% over the five-year period.

What is even more impressive about my son’s returns is that his returns were dragged down significantly by a single company – ASV. When my son bought it, the company had its own patented suspension system for its tracks. As I recall, not too much later, it had a change in management. The new management decided to license the patent to Caterpillar. Unfortunately for ASV, Caterpillar’s much larger market share caused a large reduction in ASV’s sales that couldn’t be made up by the licensing fees. Over a several year period, ASV’s stock price went down by about one-third. This experience illustrates another lesson when looking a company’s fundamentals for investment decisions – carefully follow the decisions of any new management teams.

Without ASV, our son’s returns were much more impressive – 19% over the two-year period and 13% over the five-year period.

Don’t Invest in What You Don’t Understand

A related concept, but somewhat different one, is to avoid picking stocks in companies and sectors you don’t understand. Lynch has all sorts of great examples of why people buy stock in companies whose business they don’t understand – hot tips from a “rich uncle,” aggressive buy recommendations from a broker and so on and so forth.

Not understanding a company’s business can be everything from it having a very technical focus to not being familiar with its marketplace (i.e., to whom and how it sells its products) to being so diverse that it is hard to figure out what drives profits.   Essentially, his advice is that, if you can’t explain to someone what the company does in a few sentences, you shouldn’t buy its stock.

One Example of My Choices

I fell into that trap. We had a little extra money many years ago and decided to take some risk by making a very small investment in a private placement. When a company sells its stocks to a small group of investors and not the general public, it is called a private placement.

The two choices we were offered were a company that was marketing telemedicine to the Veterans Administration and a barbeque restaurant that was just opening its first locations. Our assessment was that the restaurant space was grossly overcrowded and that telemedicine would catch on quickly with the aging population and increases in technology. Not understanding that the telemedicine company didn’t actually have any customers or the challenges of getting a contract with the Veterans Administration, we made a very small investment in it.

Were we wrong! Many years later, we wrote off the entire value of the investment in the telemedicine company as it had become worthless. The restaurant was Famous Dave’s.

Ten Baggers

One of Lynch’s goals is picking stocks that are ten-baggers. These are companies whose stocks appreciate to at least 10 times what you paid for them in relatively short periods of time. By identifying trends in your local area, you are more likely to be able to earn the high returns associated with companies that start small and grow rapidly. As an example, consider the increases in Apple’s stock price.

The picture above shows the annual appreciation of Apple stock from 1981 through 2018. If you had owned the stock during any of the years circled in green, you would have more than tripled your money in two years. Not quite 10 times, but 3 to 5 times in 2 years is still a return anyone would envy. If you look at the returns in more recent circled in orange, you’ll see much more modest appreciation. The returns were still very attractive, but much lower than the earlier period.

Lynch points out the benefit of having just one ten-bagger in a portfolio with otherwise mundane performers. For example, if you invest the same amount in 9 stocks each having a total return of 5% per year, your total return in 5 years will be 27.6%. If you add a ten bagger to the mix, your total return increases to 115% or 16.5% per year.

Although our daughter didn’t have any ten baggers, her portfolio benefited from a similar effect. From 2006-2010, her three retail stocks had an annual average return of -1.6%. Apple, on the other hand, was almost a 4.5-bagger (its price at the end of 2010 was 4.4 times its price at the end of 2005). The addition of that one company to her portfolio increased her return from -1.6% to +8.2%!

Do Your Research

Once you’ve identified a company with an appealing product or service, it isn’t time to buy yet! Lynch suggests looking at the company’s financial statements and several financial metrics. I’ll talk about a few of them here.

Percent of Sales

The first thing to check is whether the new “thing” is big enough to have an impact on the profitability of the company. To illustrate, let’s look at two companies that make widgets. Company A makes primarily widgets, so 90% of its sales is from widgets. Company B makes a lot of things. Only 5% of Company B’s sales is from widgets. A new thingamabob has been designed that will double the sales of widgets with no impact on the profit margin (percent of sales cost that turns into profit). Company A’s profit will increase by 90%, whereas Company B’s profit will increase by only 5%. Because stock prices are driven in large part by estimates of future profitability, you would expect that Company A’s stock price would increase much more if it added thingamabobs to its widgets than Company B’s stock price.

Future Earnings

For many reasons identified by Lynch, stock prices don’t always move in line with earnings. Nonetheless, the more that earnings increase, the more that the stock price is likely to go up. Lynch suggests that you make sure you understand how a company plans to grow its earnings.

Ways to Increase Earnings

He identifies the following five ways for increasing earnings:

  • Reduce costs
  • Raise prices
  • Expand into new markets
  • Sell more product to existing markets
  • Revitalize, close or otherwise dispose of losing operations

If you plan to hold the company’s stock for a fairly short time, any of these ways of increasing earnings could provide nice returns. I tend to buy and hold my stocks for a long time (over 25 years in several cases), so I prefer companies whose growth strategies include expanding into new markets or selling more product to existing markets. The other three approaches tend to produce one-time increases to earnings that can’t be replicated over and over again.

Expanding into New Markets

One of the most common ways existing companies expand into new markets is through acquiring other companies. There are many companies that have grown very successfully through acquisition.

Berkshire Hathaway

One such company is Berkshire Hathaway, whose chairman is Warren Buffett. Over the past 40 years, Berkshire Hathaway has purchased such companies as Burlington Northern, Dairy Queen, and Fruit of the Loom, among others. The graph below shows the value of $1 invested in Berkshire Hathaway (stock symbol: BRK-A) since 1980 as compared to a $1 investment in the S&P 500.[1]

Clearly, Berkshire Hathaway has been highly successful in its acquisition strategy.

General Electric

Other companies have been less successful with their expansion and acquisition strategies. One such example is General Electric (GE). When I was young, I thought of GE as primarily manufacturing appliances and light bulbs. The graph below shows how the value of $1 invested in GE increased between 1962 and 2000 as compared to the same investment in the S&P 500.

Clearly, over that time frame, GE was very successful. In fact, my in-laws bought a few shares of GE for each of my kids when they were young (in the 1990s) because it was considered such a great, stable company.

Over the past 20 years, it has expanded its operations into loans, insurance and medical products and related services.   In hindsight, it appears that GE wasn’t sufficiently familiar with all of the business it entered or acquired.  It also used a lot of debt to finance its acquisitions and expansions.  As a result, its stock price suffered. The graph below shows how much a $1 investment in GE’s stock has changed over the past 20 years as compared to the S&P 500.[2]

Comparison

From 2000 to late 2019, Berkshire Hathaway’s stock price went up by a factor of almost 5 while GE’s stock price decreased by more than 50%. Interestingly, GE’s new CEO (hired in 2018) announced a transformation plan that includes selling several of its businesses, allowing it to focus primarily on “safely delivering people where they need to go; powering homes, schools, hospitals, and businesses; and offering more precise diagnostics and care when patients need it most.”[3]

You’ll want to make sure you understand which new markets a company plans to enter, think about whether management has sufficient experience or expertise to expand successfully and understand how much debt the company is using to finance these expansions.

P/E Ratio

The ratio of the price of a company’s stock to its annual earnings is known as the P/E ratio. A P/E ratio is one way to measure whether a company’s stock price is expensive. A rule of thumb mentioned by Lynch is that a stock is reasonably priced when its P/E is about the same as its future earnings growth rate. He acknowledges the important point that the future earnings growth rate isn’t ever known and that lots of experts spend a lot of time incorrectly estimating the earnings growth rate.

Nonetheless, you can at least look to see if a company’s P/E ratio is the right order of magnitude. For example, if you are looking at a company that slowly expands its sales in its current market, its earnings growth rate might be 5% to 7%. If that company’s P/E were 25, you’d know it was expensive. If the P/E ratio were 2, it might be an attractive buy. So, it isn’t necessarily important to know whether the company’s earnings growth rate is going to 5% or 7%, but rather whether it is likely to be 5% or 25%.

Schwab has an entire post on using the P/E ratio as part of stock analyses.

Debt/Equity Ratio

Companies can get cash from three sources to finance their operations – equity (selling shares of stock), borrowing and profits. Long-term debt is the amount of money that a company has borrowed, other than to meet short-term cash needs (such as through a line of credit). Long-term debt frequently is in the form of bank loans or bonds issued by the company.

The ratio of the amount of long-term debt to equity (the difference between assets and liabilities which is an estimate of the value of the company to the stockholders) is known as the debt-to-equity ratio. There are both advantages and disadvantages to a high debt-to-equity ratio. Let’s look at an example.

Company A has $100 of profit before interest (and ignoring taxes) and $60 of interest payments, for net income of $40 ($100 – $60). Company B is the same as Company A but it has no long-term debt, so its net income is $100. If profit before interest went down by 40%, Company B’s net income would also decrease by 40% to $60. Company A’s net income, though would go from $40 to $0 or a 100% decrease. The primary disadvantage of debt is that it magnifies the impact of bad news. The 40% decrease in profit before interest turned into a 100% decrease in net income for Company A with all its debt. This magnification is called leverage or debt leverage.

On the plus side, increases in profits are also magnified. If Company A’s profit before interest increased by 50% to $150, its net income would increase by $50 to $90. The percentage increase in net income in this case is +125% as compared to the +50% increase in Company B’s net income.

Other Metrics

Lynch discusses several other things to check on a company’s financial statements before making an investment.   I talk about one of them, the dividend payout ratio, in my post on investing for dividends. I’ll let you read One Up on Wall Street to learn more about the other metrics and to get Lynch’s views and examples on the ones I’ve discussed here.

Create Your Story

For every company in which you invest, Lynch recommends that you create a story. There are two parts to the story.

Two-Minute Story

First, you should be able to describe the company’s business in what I would call an “elevator speech.” That is, it is important to be able to explain to someone else what the company does and why you think it will grow all in two minutes. If your explanation takes longer, it is likely an indication that the company’s business is too complex to benefit from a trend you observe or you don’t fully understand its business.

Additional Details

Second, you’ll want to have a story for yourself that includes a bit more detail about what you think will cause earnings (and hopefully therefore the stock price) to increase. Is it one of the one-time actions, such as cutting expenses or increases prices, or a longer-term plan to increase sales?

If the former, you’ll want to monitor the progress of those actions. Are they being implemented? Have they been effective? Has their full impact been reflected in earnings and/or the stock price? If the company’s plans don’t come to fruition or they were successful and reflected in earnings, you’ll want to evaluate whether you want to continue to own the company’s stock or whether it is time to sell it.

If the latter, you’ll want to understand what steps the company plans to take to increase sales. You can then monitor the company’s progress towards those plans. If it doesn’t appear to be on track, it might be time to considering selling the stock and investing in another company.

Final Thoughts

As I re-read Lynch’s book in preparation for writing this post, I was reminded how many useful tidbits he provides in it. Interspersed among the anecdotes are lots of lists, checklists and guidance on everything from identifying a company in which to possibly invest to determining the company’s growth pattern to reading financials to designing your portfolio. If you plan to start picking stocks in individual companies, I highly recommend One Up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch as a good first book on the topic. If you are looking for a shorter source for similar information, I suggest this post from Schwab.

 

 

[1] Taken from Yahoo Finance, November 8, 2019.

[2] Taken from Yahoo Finance on November 8, 2019

[3] General Electric 2008 Annual Report, https://www.ge.com/investor-relations/sites/default/files/GE_AR18.pdf, p3.

Investing for Dividends

Investing for dividends is one of many strategies investors use to identify stocks for their portfolios. Among the strategies I identified in my post on what you need to know about stocks, this is not one that I have ever used.  So I reached out to one of my Twitter followers who uses it to get more information, Dividend Diplomats (aka Lanny and Bert) to get some real-life insights. With Lanny’s and Bert’s help, I will:

  • define dividends.
  • talk about the criteria that Lanny and Bert use for selecting companies and why they are important.
  • show some historical returns for dividend-issuing companies.
  • explain the tax implications of dividends on your total return.

What are Dividends?

A dividend is a cash distribution from a company to its shareholders. The amount of the dividend is stated on a per-share basis.  The amount of cash you receive is equal to the number of shares you own times the amount of the dividend. When companies announce that they are going to pay a dividend, they provide two dates.  The first is the date on which share ownership is determined (also known as the ex-dividend date).  The second is the date on which the dividend will be paid. For example, a company might declare a 15₵ dividend to people who own shares on May 1 payable on May 15. Even if you sell your stock between May 1 and May 15, you will get 15₵ for every share you owned on May 1.

When a company earns a profit, it has two choices for what to do with the profit. Under one option, the company can keep the profit and use it to support future operations. For example, the company might buy more equipment to allow it to increase the number of products is makes or might buy another company to expand its operations. Under the second option, the company distributes some or all of its profit to shareholders as dividends. My experience is that companies that are growing rapidly tend to keep their profits, whereas companies that can’t find enough opportunities to reinvest their profits to fund growth tend to issue dividends.

Dividend Diplomats – A Little Background

Lanny and Bert have been blogging for over 5.5 years and have been best friends for 7.  They both are pursuing the same goal of reaching financial freedom and retiring early to break the “9 to 5” chains.  They hope to achieve financial freedom through dividend investing, frugal living, and using as many “personal finance” hacks as possible to keep expenses low and bring in additional income. For more information about the Dividend Diplomats, check out their web site at www.dividenddiplomats.com.

Why Use the Investing for Dividends Strategy

As you’ll see in future posts, I have used several strategies for my stock investments, but have never focused on investing for dividends.

My Preconceived Notions

I have always considered investing for dividends as most appropriate for people who need the cash to pay their living expenses, such as people who are retired. I am retired, but currently have cash and some bonds that I use to cover my living expenses. As I get further into retirement, I will need to start liquidating some of my stocks or start investing for dividends.

Lanny’s & Bert’s Motivation

So, when I started reading about Lanny and Bert, I wondered why people who are still working (and a lot younger than I am) would be interested in investing for dividends.   Here’s what they said.

“There were a few different motivating factors.

Lanny had endured a very difficult childhood, where money was always limited and his family had struggled financially.   Due to this, he personally wanted to never have to worry about money, period.

Bert was not a dividend growth investor until he met Lanny.  Once he talked to Lanny, learned about dividend investing, and saw the math, he was sold and hasn’t looked back since.

Therefore, we are looking to build a growing passive income stream so we can retire early and pursue our passions.  Building a stream of growing, truly passive dividend income has always been a very attractive option to us.  We love the fact that dividend income is truly passive (outside of initial capital, we don’t have to lift a finger) and we are building equity in great, established companies that have paid dividends throughout various economic cycles.

Second, the math just makes sense.  It is crazy how quickly your income stream grows when you are anticipating a dividend growth rate of 6%+ (on average).  Lanny writes an article each quarter showing the impact of dividend increases and we have demonstrated the impact of dividend reinvesting on our site in the past. When you see the math on paper, it is insane. “

Lanny and Bert provided links to a couple of their posts that illustrate the math: Impact of Dividend Increases and Power of Dividend Reinvesting.

Lanny’s & Bert’s Strategy

Lanny and Bert developed a dividend stock screener that helps them identify undervalued dividend growth stocks in which to consider investing.  At a minimum, the companies must pass three metrics to be further considered for investment:

  • Valuation (P/E Ratio) less than the market average.
  • Payout Ratio Less than 60%. (Unless the industry has a higher benchmarked figure. i.e. oil, tobacco, utilities, REITs, etc., then they compare to the industry payout ratio.)
  • History of increasing dividends.

They don’t consider dividend yield until later in the process.  They never advocate chasing dividend yield at the risk of dividend safety. That is, they would rather a dividend that has very low risk of being reduced or eliminated (i.e., safety) than a higher dividend be unsustainable over the long term.

That’s why they don’t look at yield initially.  It allows them to focus on the important metrics that help them gain comfort over the safety of the dividend.  Here is a link to their Dividend Stock Screener.

Payout Ratio

Lanny and Bert mention that that one of their key metrics is a payout ratio. A dividend payout ratio is the annual amount of a company’s dividend divided by its earnings per share.  For more about earnings per share, check out my post on reading financial statements.

A dividend payout ratio of less than 1 means that a company is retaining some of its earnings and distributing the rest. If the ratio is more than 1, it means that the company is earning less money than it is paying out in dividends.

I worked for a company that had a payout ratio of more than 1. When I first started working there, the company had more capital than it could use. The company was returning its excess capital to its shareholders through the high dividend. After several years, the company’s capital approached the amount it needed to support its business. If it had cut its dividend to an amount lower than its earnings, the stock price might have decreased significantly. Instead, the company was sold. Had the company not been sold, its shareholders might have had both a decrease in future dividend payments and a reduction in the value of their stock at the same time.  This double whammy (dividend cut at the same time as a price decrease) is a risk of owning a stock in a dividend-issuing company especially those with high dividend payout ratios.

Performance – Lanny and Bert’s View

Lanny and Bert are not assuming they can do better than management or the market.  As noted above, they tend to focus on companies with a dividend payout ratio less than 60%.  This approach allows for all three of increasing dividends to shareholders, share repurchases, and internal growth for profit.  Also, this approach ensures the company is continuing to invest in itself as well.  You can’t pay a dividend in the future if you can’t grow, or even maintain, your current earnings stream.  Therefore, if revenues are stagnant or shrinking, the safety of the company’s dividend comes into question.  Companies “can” pay out a dividend that is larger than your earnings over the short-to-medium term.  However, it is not sustainable as was the case with the company for which I worked.

Historical Performance

I was curious about how stocks that met Lanny and Bert’s criteria performed. I have a subscription to the ValueLine Analyzer Plus. It contains current and historical financial data and stock prices about hundreds of companies. I looked at two time periods.  I first looked at the most recent year (November 2018 to November 2019).  Because I was curious about how those stocks performed in the 2008 crash, I also looked at the ten-year period from 2003 to 2013. I would have used a shorter period around the 2008 crash and the period thereafter, but didn’t save the data in the right format so had to look at time periods for which I had saved the data in an accessible manner.

How I Measured Performance

For both time periods, I identified all stocks for which the data I needed for the analysis were available at both the beginning and end of the period.  There were 1,505 companies included in the sample in the 2018-2019 period and 952 companies for the 2003 to 2013 period.

I then identified companies (a) whose dividend grew in each of the previous two fiscal years, (b) whose dividend payout ratio was less than 60% and (c) whose P/B ratio was less than the average of all of the companies in the same. That is, I attempted to identify the companies that met Lanny and Bert’s criteria. There were 332 companies in the 2018-2019 period and 109 companies in the 2003-2013 period that met these criteria.

ValueLine ranks companies based on what it calls Timeliness, with companies with Timeliness ratings of 1 having the best expected performance and those having a rating of 5 having the worst expected performance. Because I suspected that Bert and Lanny’s screen would tend to select more companies with favorable Timeliness ratings than those with poorer ones, I looked at both the overall results, as well as the results by Timeliness rating.

November 2018 – November 2019

In the most recent year, the stocks that met Lanny’s and Bert’s criteria had an average total return (dividends plus change in stock price) of 11% as compared to 8.5% for the total sample. That is, in the current market, dividend issuing companies meeting their criteria returned more than the average of all companies.

Interestingly, when I stratified the companies by Timeliness rating, it showed that for companies with good Timeliness ratings (1 and 2), the Lanny’s and Bert’s companies underperformed the group. For companies with two of the three lower Timeliness ratings (3 and 5), though, Lanny’s and Bert’s companies not only did better than the average of all companies in the group, but also did better than even the group of companies with a Timeliness rating of 1! It looks to me as if their approach might identify some gems in what otherwise appear to be poorer performing companies.

The chart below shows these comparisons.

2003 to 2013

Over the longer time period from 2003 to 2013, the companies meeting Lanny’s and Bert’s criteria didn’t do quite as well as the average of all companies. In this case, the stocks meeting their criteria had a compound annual return of 5% as compared to 7% for all stocks in the sample. Without more data, it is hard to tell whether the difference in return is the sample of dividend-issuing companies is small, because those companies didn’t fare as well during the Great Recession or something else.

I looked at the total returns by Timeliness rating and the results were inconsistent for both the “all stocks” group and the ones that met our criteria. A lot can happen in 10 years! Nonetheless, it was interesting to see that the dividend-yielding stocks that had Timeliness ratings of 5 in 2003 out performed all other subsets of the data. So, while these stocks didn’t have quite as high a total return over the 10-year period in the aggregate, there are clearly some above-average performers within the group.

Tax Ramifications of Dividends

One of the drawbacks of investing in companies with dividends, as opposed to companies that reinvest their earnings for growth, is that you might need to pay taxes on the dividend income as it gets distributed.

Types of Accounts

If you hold your dividend-yielding stocks in a tax-deferred (e.g., Traditional IRA or 401(k) in the US or RRSP in Canada) or tax-free (e.g., Roth IRA or 401(k) in the US or TFSA in Canada), it doesn’t matter whether your returns are in the form of price appreciation or dividends. Your total return in each of those types of accounts gets taxed the same. That is, if you hold the stocks in a tax-deferred account, you will pay tax on your total returns, regardless of whether it is interest, dividends or appreciation, at your ordinary income tax rate. If you hold the stocks in a tax-free account, you won’t pay taxes on any returns.

The only type of account in which it matters whether your return is in the form of price appreciation or dividends is a taxable account. In the US, most people pay 15% Federal income tax plus some additional amount for state income taxes on dividends in the year in which they are issued. They pay taxes at the same rate on capital gains, but only when the stock is sold, not as the price changes from year to year. In Canada, the difference is even greater. Dividends are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate (i.e., they are added to your wages) and capital gains are taxed at 50% of your ordinary income tax rate and only when you sell the stock.

Dividend Reinvestment

When you earn dividends from a company, you often have the option to automatically reinvest the dividends in the same company’s stock. This process is a dividend reinvestment plan. Lanny and Bert take this approach.

Dividend reinvestment plans are terrific ways to make sure you stay invested in companies that you like, as you don’t have to remember to buy more stock when the dividend is reinvested. The drawback of dividend reinvestment plans is that you will owe tax on the amount of the dividend, even if you don’t receive it in cash. If you reinvest 100% of your dividends, you’ll need to have cash from some other source to pay the taxes unless you hold the investments in a tax-free or tax-deferred account.

Illustration

Let’s assume you are a US investor subject to the 15% Federal tax rate and pay no state income tax. You have two companies you are considering. You expect each to have a total return of 8%. One company’s return will be 100% in dividends, while the other company issues no dividends. You plan to own the stock for 10 years. Your initial investment will be $1,000 and you will pay your income taxes out of your dividends, so you reinvest 85% of the dividends you earn each year.

At the end of the 10th year, you will have $1,931 if you buy the company with 8% dividends. If you buy the company with no dividends, your stock will be worth $2,159. After you pay capital gains tax of $174, you will have $1,985 or 2.8% more than if you buy stock in the company that issues 8% dividends.

If you pay Canadian taxes, the difference is even bigger because of the much lower tax rate on capital gains than dividends. Over the full ten-year period, you will end up with almost 11% more if you buy stock in the company with no dividends than if you buy stock in the dividend-issuing company.

As such, you’ll want to put as much of your portfolio of dividend-issuing stocks in a tax-deferred or tax-free account as possible to minimize the impact of taxes on your total return.

Reading Financial Statements

Reading financial statement guides many investors in their decisions to buy and sell stocks.   Investors who focus on financial fundamentals look at recent financial statements in the context of other trends to estimate how much a company’s future profit might grow.  High-dividend yield investors need to understand the company’s financial statements to evaluate the sustainability of current dividend payments into the future.

Before investing in the stock of individual companies, it is good to understand the basics of their financial statements. In this post, I’ll identify the important values in the income statement and balance sheet and discuss important ratios that investors use to evaluate financial performance.  This post provides the basics of how stocks work.  In future posts, I’ll illustrate how these values can be used to evaluate companies and their stock prices under different investment strategies.

McCormick

Every company’s financial statements will be slightly different because every business is different. For illustration, I will use excerpts from the financial statements in the McCormick 2018 Annual Report. McCormick sells spices under its own name, but also owns the French’s mustard, Club House crackers and Lawry’s seasonings brands, among others. To be clear, my selection of McCormick for illustration is not intended to be a recommendation.

In this post, I’ll explain the key line items in McCormick’s financial statements.  If you are interested in other line items, you can either ask me in the comments or by e-mail or do some research on your own.

Income Statement

An income statement presents a summary of the financial aspects of a company’s operations and other financial transactions that occur during the financial reporting period. Publicly traded companies are required to provide their income statements to financial regulators (e.g., the Security & Exchange Commission in the US) quarterly and annually in reports known as the 10-Q and 10-K, respectively.

Here is a picture of the income statement from the McCormick 2018 Annual Report.[1]   All of the numbers in the excerpts from McCormick’s financial statements are in millions.

Revenue is the money that a company receives for the goods and services it delivered during the year.  As you can see in its income statement McCormick had $5.4 billion in total revenues (net sales) in 2018.

Expenses

Expenses represents all the money that a company spends in the year, with one exception.

Depreciation

When the company purchases something that is expected to last for a long time, it is called a capital asset. Companies don’t include the full cost of capital assets in expenses in the year in which they buy them. Rather, they spread the costs of capital assets over several years. The amount spread to each year is called depreciation. The depreciation of capital assets is included on the Income Statement, not the actual cash expense.

Operating Expenses or Cost of Goods Sold

Operating expenses, sometimes called Cost of Goods Sold for sellers of products, are those that are directly related to the manufacture of products or provision of services sold in the year. For McCormick, these expenses were $3.0 billion in 2018.

General and Administrative (G&A) Expenses

G&A expenses, sometimes called overhead expenses, represent the cost to run the company and are not directly related to specific products or services. Some companies include research and development (R&D) expenses with G&A expenses while others show them separately. For McCormick, these expenses were about $1.4 billion, an amount I had to find in its Notes to Financial Statements.

Other Income/Expenses

There are many types of income and expenses that don’t relate to products and services and aren’t G&A expenses. These items are usually small relative to the other line items on the income statement. For McCormick, there are three line items that fall in the Other Income/Expenses category

  • Transaction and integration expenses of $22 million
  • Special charges of $16 million
  • Other income, net of $13 million

These amounts combine to a net total of $25 million (=$22 million + $16 million – $13 million) in 2018. Compared to the other revenue and expense items, all of which are measured in billions of dollars, these amounts are small, as expected.

Interest Expenses

Interest expense represents interest that the company pays on its debt.  McCormick’s had $175 million of interest expense in 2018.

Income Taxes

These expenses represent income taxes that the company pays to any federal, state or local governments. McCormick had a tax benefit of $157 million in 2018. By looking at the Notes to Financial Statements included in the Annual Report, I found that McCormick owed $183 million in taxes related to 2018 operations, but the reduction in the US Federal tax rate on corporations in early 2018 caused an adjustment to McCormick’s tax liabilities. The decrease in tax rate created a benefit of $340 million. The $157 million tax benefit on the income statement is equal to the $183 million for current operations offset by the $340 million reduction in future taxes. When looking at McCormick’s profits going forward, the $183 million of taxes for current operations is the more important number because the $340 million is a one-time adjustment.

Accrual Basis vs. Cash Basis

One of the hardest things for most people to understand about income statements is the difference between the values on the income statement and the cash the company receives and pays. The income statement is said to be on an “accrual” basis. Accrual amounts relate to goods and services delivered during the year, regardless of when the cash is actually received or paid.

To clarify, revenues on the income statement represent the amount of cash the company has or will receive for goods or services delivered in the year. If the company hasn’t received some of its compensation for goods or services by the end of the year, it creates an asset on its balance sheet for accounts receivable. If it receives the cash before it delivers the goods or services, it creates a liability for goods or services due to customers.

Similarly, the expenses on the income statement relate to the products or services delivered in the year. If a company has to pay for components of its products, for example, before it delivers them, it will create an asset on its balance sheet for inventory. If it hasn’t paid all of the bills related to products delivered in the year, it creates a liability on the balance sheet for accounts payable.

As you can see, many balance sheet items (discussed further below) are really differences between amounts accrued on the income statement and actual cash received or paid.

Measures of Profit

Companies have several measures of profit. They can be measured as either dollar amounts or percentages or revenues. In this post, I’ll put “%” after the type of profit when I’m referring to the profit as a percentage of revenue.

Gross Margin

The gross margin is calculated as revenues minus operating expenses. This line is labeled as “Gross profit” in the McCormick income statement. In 2018, McCormick’s gross margin was $2.4 billion and corresponds to 44% of revenues. It represents the amount of profit the company would have had if its only expenses were those directly related to products and services.

Operating Income

Operating income is calculated as the gross margin minus G&A expenses and some components of other income and expenses. For 2018, McCormick’s operating income was $903 million or 17% of revenues. It represents the amount of profit the company would have had if it didn’t have any interest expense or taxes. It is sometimes called EBIT or earnings before interest and taxes.

Pre-tax Income

Pre-tax income is calculated as operating income minus interest expense and some components of other income and expenses. For 2018, McCormick had $741 million of pre-tax income (also known as EBIT or earnings before income taxes) or 14% of revenues.

Net Income

Net income is the bottom-line profit after taxes. It is calculated as pre-tax income minus income taxes. For 2018, McCormick had net income of $899 million. Recall, though, that McCormick had a one-time benefit from the change in tax rate of $340 million, so its net income would have been $559 million on a “normalized” basis or 10% of revenues. This adjusted net income is a better value for estimating future profits, as McCormick won’t get the benefit of a tax rate change every year.

Other Comprehensive Income

There are some values that impact the net worth of a company that don’t appear in the calculation of net income, but rather appears either at the bottom of the Income Statement or on a separate schedule in the financials. These items are referred to as Other Comprehensive Income. They can include the impact of changes in foreign exchange rates, certain transactions or changes in valuation related to investments and changes in the value of pension plans. As with other income, Other Comprehensive Income is usually small relative to other values on the income statement. If it isn’t, you’ll want to read the Notes to Financial Statements to understand the sources of Other Comprehensive Income and how it might affect profitability and growth in the future.

Balance Sheet

A balance sheet shows everything that a company owns or is owed (assets) and owes (liabilities) on a particular date.  As I mentioned earlier that many balance sheet items represent the differences between what the company has accrued on its income statement and what it has actually paid or received in cash. The balance sheet also shows the difference between assets and liabilities, which corresponds to its net worth or shareholders’ equity.

Here is a picture of McCormick’s 11/30/18 balance sheet taken from its Annual Report.[2]

Assets

Assets represent the value of things the company owns and amounts it is owed. Current assets are assets that a company can sell and turn into cash within a year. They are usually reported separately on a balance sheet.

McCormick had $10 billion in total assets on November 30, 2018. As you can see, inventory was its largest current asset at $786 million. Inventory represents the amount already spent on products that are ready to be sold or are in the process of being manufactured.

McCormick’s largest assets overall are its $4.5 billion of goodwill and $2.9 billion of intangible assets. These assets appear on some companies’ financial statements but not others. As you look at the net worth of a company, you’ll want to understand these assets.

Goodwill is created when one company buys another for a price that is higher than the net worth of the acquired company. That difference between the price and the net worth is intended to represent the present value of future profits on the acquired business. Goodwill is generally reduced as the profits emerge. In 2017, McCormick’s bought RB Foods which includes the French’s mustard, Frank’s RedHot and Cattlemen’s brands. More than three-quarters of McCormick’s goodwill was created when it bought RB Foods.

In McCormick’s case, the intangible assets represent the value of its brand names and trademarks. Although not exactly correct, the amount can be thought of as the present value of the future profits McCormick thinks it will get as the result of owning the brand names and trademarks.

Liabilities

Liabilities represent money or the value of products or services a company owes to others. McCormick had $7.1 billion in liabilities on November 30, 2018. The largest of these liabilities was Long Term Debt of $4.1 billion. McCormick issued roughly $3.4 billion in debt to finance its acquisition of RB Foods in 2017.

Equity

Shareholders’ equity represents the difference between assets and liabilities. It represents what is known as the “book value” of the company. On November 30, 2018, Boeing’s shareholders’ equity was $3.2 billion.

Key Financial Ratios

When deciding whether to buy or sell stock in a company, there are a number of ratios that many investors consider. I’ve highlighted a few important ones in this section, using the McCormick financial statement excerpts from above for illustration. I note that I have used simplified versions of the financial statements and the calculations, so you will likely see published values for McCormick that differ a bit from those calculated here.

ROE or Return on Equity

Return on equity (ROE) can be approximated as Net Income for the year divided by Shareholders’ Equity at the beginning of the year. For McCormick, it is approximated for 2018 as the $899 million of net income divided by the $2,571 million of shareholders’ equity at the end of its 2017 fiscal year or 35%. That ROE is very high. Recall, though, that McCormick had a one-time tax benefit of $340 million in 2018. If we exclude that benefit as it won’t be repeated in the future, we get an adjusted ROE of 22%.

According to CSI Market[3], the average ROE for the total market for 2018 was around 13%. ValueLine, a source for lots of qualitative and quantitative information about companies, reports that the average ROE for companies in the food processing industry (in which McCormick falls) is about 15%.[4] As such, even McCormick’s adjusted ROE is higher than these averages.

P/E Ratio or Price/Earnings Ratio

The Price/Earnings or P/E ratio is the stock price divided by the earnings per share. McCormick had roughly 130 million shares of stock outstanding in 2018. As such, its earnings per share was about $7 (=$899 million/130 million shares). McCormick’s stock price on November 30, 2018 (the date of the financial statements) was $150, which corresponds to a P/E ratio of about 22.

According to ValueLine, the average P/E of companies in the food processing industry on October 31, 2019 was 23. By comparison, the average P/E for the market has been between 16 and 18 for the past year or so. As such, McCormick’s P/E is in line with its peers. If we adjust McCormick’s earnings to exclude the one-time tax benefit, its earnings per share would have been about $4.25 per share. When we divided the $150 stock price by this smaller number, the adjusted P/E is about 35 or much higher than its peers.

P/B Ratio or Price/Book Ratio

The Price/Book or P/B ratio is the stock price divided by shareholders’ equity (book value) per share. McCormick’s equity as of November 30, 2018 was $3,182 million. When divided by the number of outstanding shares, the book value per share was $24. The stock price divided by the book value is about 0.90. ValueLine indicates that the average P/B ratio on October 31, 2019 for the food processing industry was about 3.3 or much higher than McCormicks’ P/B ratio.

P/B Ratio > 1

When the P/B ratio is greater than 1, the difference between the stock price and the book value per share is the present value of future earnings estimated by investors. The higher the P/B ratio, the higher the value investors place on future earnings.

P/B < 1

When the P/B ratio is less than 1, it means that investors either think that the future earnings are going to negative (which doesn’t appear to be the case for McCormick) or they don’t think shareholders’ equity is fairly valued. In the case of McCormick, it could be that investors think that the goodwill and intangible assets might be overvalued or they might be concerned that the future reductions to income as the goodwill and intangible assets are reduced will have a significant adverse impact on earnings. If either of those is the case, investors may be adjusting the company’s book value (equity) in their analyses for their perceived overstatement of goodwill and intangible assets.

Within the group of investors who look at financial fundamentals for decision-making, there is a subset called “value investors.” Value investors look for companies whose stock price doesn’t full reflect the value of the company which is often determined by P/B ratios of less than 1.00. A value investor who was confident that McCormick could maintain its current profitability and that the company had fairly estimated its goodwill and intangible assets might find McCormick to be an attractive stock.

Debt-to-Equity Ratio

Both debt and equity are ways in which a company can get money to finance their operations – either when it issues bonds or new shares of stock. The sum of the two is sometimes called total capital.

The Debt-to-Equity ratio is the amount of long-term debt divided by shareholders’ equity and is a measure of the mix the company has chosen to use for financing its operations, growth or acquisitions. McCormick has a total of $4.1 billion of debt ($4.05 billion recorded as long-term debt plus $84 million reported as the portion of long-term debt on its balance sheet). The debt-to-equity ratio is 1.30 (=4.1/3.2).

The higher the debt-to-equity ratio, the more leveraged a company is said to be. To clarify, when there is a lot of leverage, its ROE will be much higher than if some or all of the debt were equity instead. For example, McCormick’s ROE for 2018 was 35%. If all of its debt had been equity instead, its ROE would have been 13% (=$899 million/[$3.2 billion + $4.1 billion]).   The opposite it true when a company has a negative ROE. If McCormick’s ROE in 2018 had been -10% based on its current leverage, it would have been only -4% if it had only equity capital instead of its current mix of debt and equity.

Tangible Equity/Total Equity

I wasn’t planning to talk about tangible equity in this post, but my choice of McCormick almost forces me to. If you recall, I pointed out earlier in this post that McCormick’s two biggest assets are Goodwill and Intangible Assets. If a company encounters financial difficulties, it sometimes has to reduce or write-off the value of any goodwill or intangible assets. When these assets are reduced, its total equity will be reduced by the same amount, after adjustment for income taxes. In addition, goodwill and intangible assets are reduced as the future profits are expected to be earned. As such, goodwill and other intangible assets cause future net income to be lower than it would otherwise be, even if there are no write-offs.

Tangible equity is equal to total equity minus goodwill minus intangible assets. Because these assets can’t be quickly turned into cash and can have their value reduced, many investors look at ratio of tangible equity to total equity. The total of McCormick’s goodwill and intangible assets was $7.4 billion. This amount is more than twice its shareholders’ equity. What this means is that McCormick’s book value would become negative if it were required to write-down more than half of its goodwill and intangible assets.  As long as everything goes as expected, though, McCormick will be just fine. As such, this ratio is a measure of the riskiness of the stock price.

Earnings Growth Rate

Another important metric that investors consider is the earnings growth rate. When considering when to buy a stock, investors try to estimate future earnings growth rates. In the estimation process, they often consider historical growth rates. The historical earnings growth rate is the ratio of this year’s net income to last year’s net income minus 1.00.

For McCormick, after adjustment for the one-time tax benefit, the earnings growth rate from 2017 to 2018 was 25% (=$559 million / $444 million – 1). From 2016 to 2017, it was a much more modest 2%.

Stock prices tend to reflect estimated future earnings as well as estimated future earnings growth rates. There are many investment analysts who estimate the future earnings growth rates for publicly-traded companies. Yahoo Finance and most large brokerage firms’ web sites include information about analysts’ estimates of future earnings growth rates. Also, some investors look at recent growth rates and trends in the markets in which companies operate to estimate the future earnings growth rates.

Investing Decisions

These ratios, along with others, are often used by investors to evaluate the financial condition of the company and the reasonableness of its stock price. For example, one rule of thumb is that stocks are fairly priced when the P/E ratio is less than the expected future earnings growth rate. I’ll take about this rule of thumb and other decision criteria in future posts in my series on investing in stocks.

[1] https://ir.mccormick.com/financial-information, 2018 Annual Report, p50.

[2] https://ir.mccormick.com/financial-information, 2018 Annual Report, p. 51.

[3] https://csimarket.com/Industry/industry_ManagementEffectiveness.php?&hist=4, November 7, 2019

[4] ValueLine Investment Analyzer, October 31, 2019.

What You Need to Know About Stocks

Stocks are a common choice for many investors.  There are two types of stocks – preferred and common.  Because most investors buy common stocks, they will be the subject of this post.  I’ll talk about what you need to know about stocks before you buy them, including:

  • Stocks and how they work.
  • The price you will pay.
  • The risks of owning stocks.
  • Approaches people use for selecting stocks.
  • How stock are taxed.
  • When you might consider buying stocks.
  • How to buy a stock.

What are Stocks?

Stocks are ownership interests in companies.  They are sometimes called equities or shares.  When you buy a stock, you receive a certificate that indicates the number of shares you own.  If you buy your investments through a brokerage firm, it will hold your certificates for you.  If you buy them directly, you will usually receive the certificate (and will want to maintain it in an extremely safe place as it is your only proof that you own the stock).  Some companies track their stock’s owners electronically, so you may not always get a physical certificate.

How Do Stocks Work?

Companies sell stock as a way to raise money.  The company receives the amount paid for the shares of stock when they are issued, minus a fee paid to the investment banker that assists with the sale.  The process of issuing stock is called a public offering.  The first time a company offers its shares to the public, it is called an initial public offering (IPO).

Stockholder-Company Interactions

After the stock has been sold by the company, the stockholder has the following interactions with the company:

  • It receives any dividends paid by the company.
  • It gets to vote on matters brought before shareholders at least annually.  These issues include election of directors, advisory input on executive compensation, selection of auditors and other matters.
  • It has the option to sell the stock back to the company if the company decides to repurchase some of its stock.

In addition to these benefits of owning stock, you also can sell it at the then-current market price at any time.

Why Companies Care About Their Stock Prices

Interestingly, after the stock has been sold by the company, future sales of the stock do not impact the finances of the company other than its impact on executive compensation.  That is, if you buy stock in a company other than when it is issued, you pay for the stock and the proceeds go to the seller (who isn’t the company)!

You might wonder, then, why a company might care about its stock price.  That’s where executive compensation comes in!  Many directors and senior executives at publicly traded companies have a portion of their compensation either paid in stock or determined based on the price of the company’s stock.  When the leadership owns a lot of stock or is paid based on the stock price, it has a strong incentive to act in a way that will increase the price of the stock.  As such, with appropriate incentive compensation for directors and executives, their interests are more closely aligned with yours (i.e., you both want the price of the company’s stock to go up).

What Price Will I Pay?

The price you will pay for a stock is the amount that the person selling the stock is willing to take in payment.  Finance theory asserts that the price of a stock should be the present value of the cash flows you will receive as the owner of a stock.

In my post on bonds, I explain present values.  They apply fairly easily to the price of a bond, as the cash flows to the owner of a bond are fairly clear – the coupons or interest payments and the return of the principal on a known date.

By comparison, the cash flows to the owner of a stock are much more uncertain.  There are two types of cash flows to the owner of a stock – dividends and the money you receive when you sell the stock.

Dividends

Dividends are amounts paid by the company to stockholders.  Many companies pay dividends every quarter or every year.  In most cases, the amount of these dividends stay fairly constant or increase a little bit every year.  The company, though, is under no obligation to pay dividends and can decide at any time to stop paying them.  As such, while many people assume that dividends will continue to be paid, there is more uncertainty in whether they will be paid than there is with bond interest.

Proceeds from the Sale of the Stock

The owner of the stock will receive an amount equal to the number of shares sold times the price per share at the time of sale.  This cash flow has two components of uncertainty to it.

  1. You don’t know when you will sell it. You therefore don’t know for how long you need to discount this cash flow to calculate the present value.
  2. It is impossible to predict the price of a stock in the future.

What are the Risks?

The biggest risk of buying a stock is that its value could decrease.   At the extreme, a company could go bankrupt.  In a bankruptcy, creditors (e.g., employees and vendors) are paid first.  If there is money left after creditors have been paid, then the remaining funds are used to re-pay a portion of any bond principal.  By definition, there isn’t enough money to pay all of the creditors and bondholders when there is a bankruptcy.  As such, the bondholders will not get all of their principal re-paid and there will be no money left after payment has been made to bondholders and creditors.  When there is no money left in the company, the stock becomes worthless.

Any of the following factors (and others) can cause the price of the stock to go down.

Economic Conditions Change

Changes in economic conditions can cause the interest rate used for discounting in the present value calculation to increase. When the interest rate increases, present values (estimates of the price) will go down.

Company Changes

Something changes at the company that causes other investors to believe that the company’s profits will be less than previously expected. One simple way that some investors estimate the price of a company’s stock is to multiply the company’s earnings by a factor, called the price-to-earnings ratio or P/E ratio.  Although P/E ratios aren’t constant over time, the price of a stock goes down when its earnings either decrease or are forecast to be lower than expected in the future. For more about P/E ratios and how a company calculates and reports on its earnings, check out this post

Increased Risk

Changes either in the economy or at the company can cause investors to think that the future profits of the company are more uncertain, i.e., riskier. When a cash flow is perceived to be riskier, a higher interest rate is used in the present value calculation.  This concept is illustrated in my post on bonds in the graph that shows how interest rates on bonds increase as the credit rating of the company goes down.  Recall that lower credit ratings correspond to higher risk.  The same concept applies to stock prices.  The prices of riskier stocks are less than the prices of less risky stocks if all other things are equal.

How Do People Decide What to Buy?

There are a number of approaches investors use to decide in which companies to buy stocks and when to buy and sell them.   I will discuss several of them in future posts.

Reasonable Price Investing

Reasonable price investors look at the financial fundaments and stock prices of companies to decide whether and when to buy and sell them.

Technical Analysis

Technical analysts, sometimes called momentum investors, look at patterns in the movement of the prices of companies’ stocks.  Day traders tend to be technical analysts whose time horizon for owning a stock can be hours or days.

High-Yield Investing

Some investors focus on companies who issue dividends.

Mutual Funds and Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs)

Rather than invest in individual companies, some investors purchase either mutual or exchange-traded funds.  Under this approach, the investor relies on the fund managers to select the companies and determine when to buy and sell each position.

Investing Clubs

A great way to get started with investing or expand your research is to join an investing club.  They provide the opportunity to pool your money with other investors to buy positions in individual companies that the group has resourced.  In addition, you get to know other people with interests similar to yours.

Turnaround Plays

Turnaround plays (companies that have struggled but are about to become successful) can produce some of the highest returns in the market.  However, identifying companies that will actually be successful under their new strategies is difficult.  As such, investing in turnaround plays can also be quite risky. The Piotroski score is one tool that can be helpful in identifying companies that are more likely to produce above-market-average returns.

How are Stocks Taxed?

There are two ways in which stocks can impact your income taxes:

  • When you receive a dividend.
  • When you sell your ownership interest in the stock.

The total amount of the dividend is subject to tax.  The difference between the proceeds of selling the stock and the amount you paid for the stock is called a realized capital gain or loss.  It is gain if the sale proceeds is more than the purchase amount and a loss if the sale proceeds are less than the purchase amount.

In the US, realized capital gains and losses on stocks you have owned for more than a year are added to dividends.  For most people, the sum of these two amounts is taxed at 15%.  For stocks owned for less than a year, the realized capital gains are taxed at your ordinary tax rate (i.e., the rate you pay on your wages).

In Canada, dividends and half of your realized capital gains are added to your wages.  The total of those amounts is subject to your ordinary income tax rate.

When Should I Buy Stocks?

Understand Stocks

The most important consideration in determining when to buy stocks is that you understand how stocks work.  One of the messages I wished I had given our children is to invest only in things you understand.  If you don’t understand stocks, you don’t want to invest in them.

Understand the Companies or Funds

You also want to make sure you understand the particular company or fund you are purchasing.  One of the biggest investing mistakes I made was when I was quite young and didn’t understand the business of the company whose stock I owned.

My parents gave me some shares of a company called Wang Laboratories.  In the 1970s and early 1980s, Wang was one of the leaders in the market for dedicated word processors.  Picture a desktop computer with a monitor that’s only software was Microsoft Word, only much harder to use.  That was Wang’s biggest product.  At one time, the stock price was $42.  Not understanding that PCs were entering the market and would be able to do so much more than a dedicated word processor, I was oblivious.  As the stock started going down, I sold a few shares in the high $30s.  When the stock dropped to $18, I told myself I would sell the rest when it got back to $21.  It never did.  A year or so later, the stock was completely worthless. Fortunately, I was young enough that I had a lot of time to recover and learn from this mistake.

Be Willing and Able to Understand the Risks

You should also not buy stocks if you can’t afford to lose some or all of your principal.  Even though only a few companies go bankrupt, such as Wang, the price of individual stocks can be quite volatile.  As discussed in my post on diversification, you can reduce the chances that your portfolio will have a decline in value by either owning a large number of stocks or owning them for a long time.  Nonetheless, you might find that the value of your portfolio is less than the amount you invested especially over short periods of time when you invest in stocks.  If you want to invest in stocks, you need to be willing to tolerate those ups and downs in value both mentally and financially.

Market Timing

There is an old investing adage, “Buy low, sell high.”  In principle, it is a great strategy.  In practice, though, it is hard to identify the peaks and valleys in either the market as a whole or an individual stock.

People who invest over very short time frames – hours or days – often use technical analysis to try to identify very short-term highs and lows to create gains.  I anticipate that most of my followers, though, will be investing for the long term and not day trading.  While you will want to select stocks that are expected to produce a return commensurate with their riskiness, it is very difficult to time the market.

That is, my suggestion for new investors with long-term investment horizons (e.g., for retirement or your young children’s college expenses) is to buy stocks or mutual funds you understand and think are likely to appreciate whenever you have the time and money available to do so.  If you happen to buy a fundamentally sound stock or index fund just before its price drops, it will be difficult to hang on but it is likely to increase in the price by the time you need to sell it.

As Chris @MoneyStir learned when he reviewed the post I wrote about whether he should pre-pay his mortgage, a fall in the stock market right after he started using his extra cash to buy stocks on a monthly basis was actually good for him!  While he lost money at first on his first few month’s investments, the ones he made over the next several months were at a lower stock price and produced a higher-than-average return over his investment horizon.  The process of buying stocks periodically, such as every month, is called dollar-cost averaging.

How and Where Do I Buy Stocks?

You can buy stocks, mutual funds and ETFs at any brokerage firm.  This article by Invested Wallet provides details on how to open an account at a brokerage firm.

Once you have an account, you need to know the name of the company or its symbol (usually 2-5 letters that can be found using Google or Yahoo Finance, for example), how many shares you want to buy and whether you want to set the price at which you purchase the stocks, use dollar-cost averaging to purchase them over a period of time or buy them at the market price.

Limit Orders

If you determine you want to buy a stock at a particular price, it is called a limit order.  The advantage of a limit order is you know exactly how much you will pay.  The disadvantages of a limit order are:

  • You might pay more than you have to if the stock price is lower at the time you place your order.
  • You might not buy the stock if no one is interested in selling the stock at a price that is a low as your desired purchase price.

Market Orders

If you place a market order, you will buy the stock at whatever price sellers are willing to take for their stock at the moment you place your order.  In some cases, you may end up paying more than you want for a stock if the price jumps up right at the time you place your order.  The advantages of a market order are (1) you know you will own the stock and (2) you know you are getting the best price available at the time you buy the stock.

Transaction Fees

Many of the major brokerage firms have recently announced that they will no longer charge you each time you purchase or sell a stock.  Some firms charge you small transaction fees, such as $4.95, each time you place a buy or sell order.  Other firms have higher charges.  You’ll want to consider the fees when you select a brokerage firm.