Holidays on a Budget

Holidays on a Budget

Even in normal circumstances, the holidays can be stressful.  With the concerns about travel and the impact on many people’s income from COVID-19, the 2020 holidays are likely to be even more challenging.  In this post, I’ll provide ideas that might help alleviate some of that stress and help make the most of the season, even if you have to celebrate your holidays on a budget.

Gifts for Family

Most holiday celebrations in December and early January involve gift giving.  For me, finding the right gifts is far and away the most stressful part of the holidays even when money hasn’t been an issue.  If you need to get through the holidays on a budget, it becomes even more stressful.

Make a Holiday Budget

Every year, before I do any shopping, I make a list of all of the people for whom I “need” to buy gifts.  An important part of this process is figuring out who really needs a gift.  Did we exchange gifts last year?  Is each person really still so close I want to give him or her a gift?  Will it affect our relationship too severely if I suggest, in advance, that we not exchange gifts even if we’ve done so in the past?

Once I have my list, I then assign a budget amount to each person.  Parents get one amount per person, nieces and nephews another, and so on.  I check to make sure the total of my budgets isn’t more than I can or want to spend on gifts.  If it is, I revisit both the list of people and the individual budgets until the total amount is tolerable.

Having budgets for each person narrows the possible choices for gifts, sometimes making it easier to identify ideas for each person.  The hardest part is sticking to the budget, but paying your bills during or after the holidays will be much easier if you do.

Draw Names

Is your list of names too long?  One option is to draw names for people in a group, such as your family or other group that exchanges gifts.  A variation on this idea is Secret Santa (or whomever is associated with your holiday) where you keep the identity of the gift giver a secret.  In both cases, buying fewer presents will help keep your holidays on a  budget.

For many years, my husband’s family drew names for the people in my generation (his siblings and the spouses) and put a cap on the amount that could be spent on the gift.  Instead of having to buy gifts for 2 other couples or 4 other adults, we each bought just one gift for a single other person.  And, because the cap was less than we tended to spend before we started drawing names, the savings was even greater.   After a while, we decided that the people in our generation didn’t need gifts from each other at all, reducing both expenses and stress.

Make Presents

Lots of people enjoy getting homemade gifts.  Do you have a talent, like art or sewing?  Or do you enjoy cooking?  Some of my favorite gifts are things that my daughter has sewed for me and a ceramic pot for plants that a friend of mine made when I was sick many years ago.

Around the holidays, quick breads, such as banana, cranberry or zucchini bread, can be real treats to give as gifts.  They wrap really nicely, too.   Or, you could give pies or cookies.  One of my mother’s friends was quite a chef and gave homemade truffles as gifts.

One gift that I have given my kids and several nieces and nephews when they were newly living away from home (and not in a dorm) is a cooler full of frozen dinners.  I’d make a couple of extra servings of whatever meal I was making for our family and put them in labeled Tupperware containers.  They didn’t take much work and were greatly appreciated.

Coupon Books

Another essentially free gift idea is a coupon book of things you will do for a friend or family member.  One friend suggested giving 30-minute back rubs, car washing, cooking a favorite meal or taking a walk together.  My kids often gave me coupon books (see photo below) that included making a meal, doing the dishes, taking out the trash and the like.

Coupon Book

In many cases, you’ll enjoy giving the gift of your time as much as the recipient enjoys receiving it.

Making the Holidays More Fun for Kids

In many families, a large portion of the joy of the holidays comes from the laughs and smiles of young children.  Here are a few ideas for bringing more joy to your kids, even when putting your holidays on a budget.

Smaller Presents

When they were young, my kids seemed much more excited by having lots of things to unwrap than by getting expensive items.  Whenever possible, I would wrap the major pieces of a large present in several packages and wrap a number of inexpensive presents, just to increase the package count.  It might seem like a larger number of smaller packages might encourage kids to want too much.  I think, at very young ages (younger than 6 or 7), the joy is more important than that message.

New Book Every Few Days

If you want help getting your children into the holiday spirit, you could buy a handful of inexpensive books and give them one every few days leading up to your family’s big day. Robyn @ADimeSaved provides a list of 10 Ways to Get Free Books for Kids.  For some families, books focusing on the holiday might be appropriate whereas as any book that interests the child might be better in other families.  A nice benefit of buying books for your children is that you can then use them as an excuse to spend time together.  Bedtime stories were a very popular event every night at our house, even after both kids were old enough to read.

Advent Calendars

One of our family traditions was an Advent calendar.  An Advent calendar provides a small gift on each day from December 1 through 24.  While that tradition is specific to Christmas, it could easily be adapted for other holidays.

One of our nannies made Advent calendars for both of our kids, as it was a tradition in her family in Germany.  (As you can tell, we had some terrific nannies.)  She started with a heavy plastic sheet and covered one side with green felt.  Next, she cut it into the shape of a tree and sewed 24 pairs of numbers (from 1 to 24) and key rings.  She then found 24 inexpensive presents for each of the kids which she wrapped and hung from the key rings.  Below is a picture of a “loaded” Advent calendar below.

Advent Calendar

My kids loved getting up every morning to open their presents.  It was such a popular tradition that I kept it up until they were in their early 20s.  My goal was to spend no more than a $1 per day per kid on these presents.  Ideas included candy (limited to about 6 or 8 days), nail clippers, hair ties for our daughter, matchbox cars for our son (still not much more than $1 a piece if bought in a package), little pads of paper, small staplers and so on.  Where we lived, Target had a whole section of $1 items that I would peruse.  Another source of $1 items is the Dollar Store.

The picture above is from a few years ago when my son was in his early 20s.  By then, he was quite happy to have his gifts alternate between pairs of socks (the roll shape packages) and candy!

Create New Traditions

The holidays can be much more than just gift giving.  In our house, our big holiday tradition was cookie-making day.  Also, on Christmas day, the extended family played bingo with Grandpa leading the game.

Cookie-making day

One Saturday every December, all the cousins and both sisters-in-law on my husband’s side would come to our house to make cookies.  When the kids were young, they primarily decorated sugar cookies (frosting, sprinkles and the like) and went off to play in other parts of the house.  As they got older, they would help cut the sugar cookies, make corn flake wreath cookies (essentially corn flakes held together with melted butter and marshmallows, decorated with red hots) and join in making of other types of cookies, many of which had no relationship to the holiday but were well-loved.

One of the many memories from cookie-making day was the day that I put a metal teapot on the stove to make hot chocolate.  I got so involved in making cookies that I forgot about it.  A little while later, after all of the water had boiled away, the spout blew off the teapot and the heat caused the glass stove top to shatter.  There were glass shards not only all over the kitchen but into the dining room and family room.  As you can imagine, the adults spent a lot of time sweeping and vacuuming while we sent the kids to other rooms to play.  Fortunately, the only damage was to the teapot and stove top and no one was injured.

Make Decorations

Almost every holiday has decorations.  Keeping Up with the Bulls (@KUWTBulls) suggests growing your own pumpkins and gourds and using them to decorate for Halloween and Thanksgiving.  Similarly, she suggests making wreaths with greens and pine cones from nearby evergreen trees. I used to take greens from the yard and put them in baskets with ribbons to make our house more festive and smell nice at the same time.

Both when I was a kid and when our kids were young, our tree was decorated with paper chains or strings of popcorn and cranberries.  Although a tree is specific to Christmas, I suspect there are other decorations that could be made for whatever holiday you celebrate or just for winter, such as paper snowflakes.

When I was a teenager, I once made a gingerbread house from scratch.  The pieces didn’t go together very well, but, once it was covered in frosting and candy (the entire roof was made of Necco wafers), it looked pretty good!  Of course, now, you can buy the pieces for a gingerbread house in a box, though it probably costs more than making it from scratch.

A Family Game

As I mentioned, my husband’s family played Bingo on most holidays when it was too cold to spend much time outside.  Fabio Marciano (@fmarciano) suggested playing Bingo over Zoom.  There are several places to get Bingo cards that you can email, such as My Free Bingo Cards.  You just need to create and email them to your family members.  What a great way to keep everyone engaged if you can’t visit in person!

View Holiday Lights

When I was young, there was a pair of houses that shared a huge front yard on the way from our house to my father’s office.  Every year, that front yard was full of lighted decorations.  It was the highlight of our annual drive a few days before Christmas to look at lights.  I’m not sure how my father knew where to find the other locations we passed as this was long before the Internet.  These days many communities post tours on their websites that you can follow either by driving or on foot.  If you’ve gotten cold while looking at lights, especially if you walked, having cocoa, tea or hot apple cider is a nice way to end the evening.

Other Stuff to do in Winter

Here are some ideas of free or inexpensive things to do in the winter that aren’t related specifically to a holiday.  Nonetheless, they might help brighten your holiday season or help with the post-holiday lull.

Museums

@planneratheartblog tells me that some libraries have passes to museums that you can borrow for free in the same manner that you borrow books.  I’d never heard of such a thing!  You might check with your local library to see if they are available for museums in your community.

Outdoor Activities

For those of us that live in cold climates, there are many outdoor activities that can be done at little or no cost – sledding, hiking, ice skating on a local pond or outdoor rink, building snow forts or snow men, having a snow ball fight and so on.  Not only are these activities fun, but they also help eliminate cabin fever and provide an opportunity to get some exercise.  And, of course, exercise in and of itself is a great for morale and fighting the post-holiday blues.

Indoor Activities

When the weather isn’t conducive to any outdoor activities, there are plenty of things to do inside that are free or don’t cost much.  You can always have a cup of cocoa or hot cider after you’ve come in from your outdoor activity.  Or, you could watch a movie, play a game or read a book, all of which are even better on a cold night if you are able to do them in front of a fire.

For more information on these and many, many other ideas, check out this post from Marjoelin @RadicalFire.

Don’t Make these Financial Mistakes

Don't Make these Financial Mistakes

The world is going through a very difficult phase. Everywhere we are hearing that we need to get adjusted to the ‘new normal’. Nothing is normal as it used to be. Children are not able to go to schools.   Most people are working from home.  Healthcare professionals are working day and night for the recovery of people who get COVID-19.  In this situation, it’s quite natural that the economic situation is not good. Many people have lost jobs or are facing pay cuts and experts are predicting that an economic recession will set in.  We don’t have any control over this situation. But, what we can do is safeguard our finances, as much as we can, and avoid financial mistakes during this COVID-19 financial emergency.

Here are a few financial mistakes you should avoid.

Satisfying Wants to Avoid Boredom

Have you been browsing online shopping websites and ordering items? Is it because you need them or just to avoid boredom?

When the lockdown started, people were stockpiling grocery items. Now focus has shifted to buying items like clothes, books, entertainment things, and so on. So, in both situations, people are overspending.

But, now is not the time to do so. Rather, you should try to save as much as you can. We will discuss how to save more later in this article.

If you are getting bored at home, nurture a hobby (hopefully an inexpensive one). Do something which you’ve always wanted but didn’t get time to do so. If you wish, you can also do some online jobs as per your liking.

Following the Same Budget

Are you following your budget? You might say that you’re following it and saving. Good! But it’s a mistake. You’ll ask why? Because it’s necessary to re-assess your budget in light of the current situation and make modifications if required. If you’ve done that, well done!

If you still have income, it is time to save as much as possible. Doing so, you can be prepared for any future rainy days. If you save more, you won’t have to worry as much about losing your job. You know that you’ll be able to sustain yourself for a few months.

You can practice frugal budgeting to save more. Frugal budgeting doesn’t mean you’ll have to compromise with eating healthy or compromise with your life; it means to cut unnecessary expenses and increase your savings.

Overspending that Doesn’t Fit in your Budget

It is better to avoid buying big-ticket items during this time. Try to delay satisfying your wants for the time being.

To illustrate the previous point, let me highlight a survey conducted in January 2020 in Nebraska by First National Bank of Omaha.  It showed that about 50% of people in our country have a pay check to pay check lifestyle. So, it becomes quite tough to meet daily necessities when they face job loss, which has happened during this pandemic.

Therefore, you should try to have a good cash reserve. To do so, you need to save more and keep the amount in a high-yield savings account.

Check out how these ways to save more that you might be overlooking:

  • Stop eating out and have nutritious homemade food which is healthier too
  • Have a list when you go grocery shopping and don’t buy anything extra
  • Switch to debit cards if that can help you reduce your expenditures
  • Cancel your gym membership and work out in fresh air
  • Check out your magazine subscriptions and cancel if you rarely read them
  • Opt for bundling offers of television and internet
  • Opt for public schooling of kids instead of private schools
  • Start envelope budgeting to save more
  • Set temperature of water heater to 120 degrees to save electricity
  • Clip coupons and use them to save money

Using your Emergency Fund for Daily Necessities

Emergency funds are for rainy days. But, don’t touch it if you can manage without it.

Check how much you have in your emergency fund. Will you be able to sustain for about 6 months without a pay check? If not, try to have that amount in your emergency fund.

Do not touch your fund unless it’s an emergency. And, if you have to use it, try to save the required funds after the situation becomes normal and you start getting your usual pay check.

Every month, try to save a definite amount in your emergency fund. And, the account should be easily accessible so that you can withdraw funds whenever you need it.

Of course, if your emergency savings is the only thing between you and not paying your bills, you can start spending it.

Not using Available HSA funds

Instead of using your emergency fund for medical treatment, use your pre-tax HSA (Health Savings Account) funds. You can use the funds to get treated or tested for Coronavirus if required. You can even use the funds to consult a therapist if you’re anxious or depressed during this pandemic.

Delaying Filing your Taxes if You’re Eligible for a Refund

As per the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act, the federal tax filing deadline has been extended to July 15, 2020, including any estimated tax payments for 2020. But, if you’re eligible for a refund, file your taxes.

As per IRS, the average refund is about $2,908 this year. It can help you to cover your living expenses or even make debt payments during this pandemic.

Not Paying the Entire Amount on your Credit Cards

It is a mistake to make only the minimum payments on your credit cards. If you do so, you’ll have to pay the interest on the outstanding balance every month. Therefore, it is always better to pay the entire balance on your cards every billing cycle if you possibly can. So, before swiping your cards, check out whether or not you’ll be able to make the entire payment in the billing cycle.

Also, use your reward points if you’re ordering things online; otherwise, your reward points may expire.

If required and if the creditors agree, you can take out a balance transfer card and transfer your existing balance to the new card. Usually, a balance transfer card comes with an introductory period of zero or low-interest rate. So, repay the transferred balance within that period.

However, after making the payment, do not cancel your existing cards especially if they have a long credit history.  If you cancel cards, the credit limit and the history of credit will reduce thereby affecting your credit score negatively.

Getting Panicked and Selling Stocks

Selling stocks after a stock market decline is one of the major financial mistakes that often people commit. They sell stocks when the market is down. But, have faith. The market will surely recover. Do not touch your investment portfolio at this time. The market recovered even after the economic crisis of 2009. However, it may take a bit more time. So, do not sell stocks right at this moment.

Another thing that the financial advisers always tell not to do is check your portfolio every day. It will make you stressed. Instead, if you have an additional amount after meeting your necessities, you can invest it in stocks as the prices are low.

Withdrawing from Retirement Accounts without Considering the Cons

The CARES Act has made it quite easy to withdraw funds from your retirement accounts, such as IRAs (Individual Retirement Account) and 401(k)s.

Here are a few advantages of withdrawing funds:

  • You can borrow up to $100,000 from your 401(k) plan.
  • You can withdraw $100,000 from any qualified retirement plan without having to pay an early withdrawal penalty.
  • You have 3 years to repay the amount without paying any income tax on the withdrawn amount.

The main advantage of starting to save early in such retirement accounts is to take advantage of compound interest. However, if you withdraw, you’ll lose the benefit to some extent. So, weigh the pros and cons before opting for this.

Not Reviewing your Financial Condition with your Financial Advisor

It is not a good idea to skip reviewing your financial situation with your financial advisor. It is rather more important at this time to have a clear view of your financial situation.

Discuss with your financial advisor how you need to maintain your investment portfolio and what moves you need to take. Talk about your financial goals and how you’ll implement them.

Taking on Debts without Thinking about How to Manage

Mortgage rates are comparatively low. You may feel the urge to take out a loan to meet your daily necessities if you’re facing financial problems. However, it is better not to take out additional debts that you can’t handle.

However, if you’re already having difficulty managing your existing debts, you can consolidate your debt. You don’t have to meet with a debt consolidator in person. You can just call a good consolidation company and seek help.

Sitting in Front of a Screen

At last, I would like to mention that it is quite important to stay physically and mentally healthy during this time. So, do not be stressed. Restrict your screen timing and have some me-time. Do something which you like. Nurture a hobby. Use this opportunity to spend time with kids and family members.

Enjoy quality time and take help from your family members to manage finances efficiently. Not committing these mistakes can help you have a better financial future.

About Good Nelly

Good Nelly is a financial writer who lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She has started her financial journey long back. Good Nelly has been associated with Debt Consolidation Care for a long time. Through her writings, she has helped people overcome their debt problems and has solved personal finance related queries. She has also written for some other websites and blogs. You can follow her Twitter profile.

A Man is Not a (Sound Financial) Plan

A man is not a (sound financial) plan

“A Man is Not a Plan!” It sounds like a very dated statement, but a guide on a recent trip I took told me about a conversation he had with one of his nieces about her finances.  They were talking about how she could improve her financial situation by building a sound financial plan. As they were talking, one of them came up with the slogan, “A Man is Not a Plan.” He suggested I use it as the title for one of my posts. So, here it is!

In this post, I will talk about the key components of a sound financial plan. A financial plan provides the structure to help you organize your financial information and decisions. I’ll provide brief explanations of the things to consider about each component, what you need to do and, for most of them, links to posts I’ve written that provide much more detail. I’ll also provide insights on how to know when you need help and who to contact.

Sound Financial Plan

A sound financial plan includes the following sections:

    • A list of your financial goals – In this section, you’ll want to identify your three to five most important financial goals.
    • A list of your current assets and liabilities (debts)
    • Your budget
    • Your savings and investment strategies to help you attain your goals, including
      • Short-term savings
      • Designated savings
      • Retirement savings
    • Desired use of debt, including re-payment of current debt
    • Your giving goals
    • Risk management strategy, i.e., types and amounts of insurance to buy
    • Understanding of your income tax situation
    • What you want to have happen to you and your assets when you become incapacitated or die and related documents

     

  • You will likely be most successful if you create a formal document with all of these components of a sound financial plan. You’ll want to review and update your financial plan at least every few years, but certainly any time you have a significant change in your finances (e.g., a significant change in wages) or are considering a significant financial decision (e.g., buying a house, getting married or having children). Of course, a less formal format is much better than no plan at all, so you should tailor your efforts to what will best help you attain your financial goals.

    Budget

    A budget itemizes all of your sources of income and all of your expenses, including money you set aside for different types of savings. It provides the framework for all of your financial decisions. Do you need to change the balance between income and expenses to meet your goals? Can you make a big expenditure? How and what types of insurance can you afford? How much debt can you afford to re-pay?

    I think that a budget is the most important component of a sound financial plan and should be the first step you take. Everyone should have a good understanding of the amounts of their income and expenses to inform the rest of their financial decisions.  While some people will benefit from going through the full process of creating a budget and monitoring it, others can be a bit less detailed.

    In the text section of your financial plan, you’ll want to include a list of your financial goals as they relate to your budget and how you plan to implement them. You can include your actual budget in your financial plan itself or as a separate attachment.

    Savings

    I generally think of savings in three categories (four if you include setting aside money for your kids): emergency savings, designated savings and retirement savings. You will want to address each of these types of savings in your financial plan. The information you’ll want to include for each type of savings is:

    • How much you currently have saved.
    • The target amounts you’d like to have saved.
    • Your plan for meeting your targets.
    • For what you’ll use it.
    • How fast you’ll replenish it if you use it.
    • How much you need to include in your budget to meet your targets.
    • Your investing strategy.
    • A list of all financial accounts with location of securely stored access information.

    Emergency Savings

    Emergency savings is money you set aside for unexpected events. These events can include increased expenses such as the need to travel to visit an ailing relative or attend a funeral or a major repair to your residence. They also include unexpected decreases in income, such as the reduced hours, leaves of absence or lay-offs related to the coronavirus.

    The general rule of thumb is that a target amount for emergency savings is three to six months of expenses. I suggest keeping one month of expenses readily available in a checking or savings account that you can access immediately and the rest is an account you can access in a day or two, such as a money market account.

    Designated Savings

    Designated savings is money you set aside for planned large expenses or bills you don’t pay every month. Examples might include your car insurance if you pay it annually or semi-annually or money you save for a replacement for your car you are going to buy in a few years.

    To estimate how much you need to set aside for your designated savings each month, you’ll want to look at all costs that you don’t pay every month and figure out how often you pay them. You’ll want to set aside enough money each month to cover those bills when they come due. For example, if your car insurance bill is $1,200 every six months, you’ll want to put $200 in your designated savings in each month in which your insurance bill isn’t paid. You’ll then take $1,000 our of your designated savings and add $200 in each month it is due to pay the bill.

    Retirement Savings

    Saving for retirement is one of the largest expenses you’ll have during your working lifetime. There are many aspects of saving for retirement:

    • Understanding how much you will receive in retirement from government programs, such as Social Security in the US or the Canadian Pension Plan in Canada.
    • Setting your retirement savings goal.
    • Estimating how much you need to save each year to meet your retirement savings goal.
    • Deciding what are the best types of accounts in which to put your retirement savings – taxable, Roth (TFSA in Canada) or Traditional (RRSP in Canada).
    • Determining in what assets (bonds, stocks, mutual funds or ETFs, for example) to invest your retirement savings in light of your risk tolerance and diversification needs and how those choices affect your investment returns.

    Debt

    Debt can be used for any number of purchases, ranging from smaller items bought on credit cards to large items purchased with a loan, such as a home. Whether you have debt outstanding today, use credit cards regularly and/or are thinking of making a large purchase using debt, you’ll want to define your goals with respect to the use of debt.

    For example, do you want to never have any debt outstanding (i.e., never buy anything for which you can’t pay cash and pay your credit card bills in full every month)? Are you willing to take out a mortgage as long as you understand the terms and can afford the payments? Do you have a combination of a high enough income and small enough savings that you are willing to use debt to make large purchases other than your home? Do you have debts you want to pay off in a certain period of time?

    As you think about these questions, you’ll want to consider what debt is good for you and what debt might be problematic.  A sound financial plan includes a list of your debts, how much you owe for each one, your target for repaying them, and your strategy for using debt in the future.

    Credit Cards

    Credit cards are the most common form of debt. Your financial plan might include the number of credit cards you want to have and your goals for paying your credit card bills. As part of these goals, you might need to add a goal about spending, such as not buying anything you can’t afford to pay off in a certain period of time.

    Student Loans

    Many people have student loans with outstanding balances. In your financial plan, you’ll want to include your goal for paying off any student loans you have. Do you want to pay them off according to the original schedule? Are you behind on payments and have a goal for getting caught up? Do you want to pay off your student loans early?

    Car Loans

    In a perfect world, your car would last long enough that you could buy its replacement out of your designated savings. However, the world isn’t perfect and you may need to consider whether to take out a loan or lease a car. Your financial plan will include your strategy for ensuring that you always have a vehicle to drive. How often do you want to replace your car? What is your goal with respect to saving for the car, loans or leases? How much will it cost to maintain and repair your car?   Your budget will include the amounts needed to cover the up-front portion of the cost of a replacement car, any loan or lease payments and amounts to put in designated savings for maintenance and repairs.

    Mortgages

    Most homeowners borrow money to help pay for it As part of creating your financial plan, you might include your goal for home ownership. Are you happy as a renter for the foreseeable future or would you like to buy a house?

    If you want to buy a house either for the first time or a replacement for one you own, you then need to figure out how to pay for the house. How much can you save for a down payment? Can you set aside enough in designated savings each month to reach that goal? What is the price of a house that you can afford, after considering property taxes, insurance, repairs and maintenance?

    Once you have a mortgage, you’ll want to select a goal for paying it off. When a mortgage has a low enough interest rate, you might make the payments according to the loan agreement and no more. If it has a higher interest rate or you foresee that your ability to make mortgage payments might change before it is fully re-paid, you might want to make extra payments if you have money in your budget.

    Paying Off Debt

    If you have debt, you’ll want to include your goals and your strategy for paying it off in your financial plan. You’ll first want to figure out how much you can afford each month to use for paying off your debts. You can then compare that amount with the amount needed to meet your goals. If the former is less than the latter, you’ll need to either generate more income, reduce other expenses, put less money in savings or be willing to live with less aggressive goals. These decisions are challenging ones and are a combination of cost/benefit analyses and personal preference.

Giving Goals

Many people want to give to their community either by volunteering their time or donating money.  If you plan to give money or assets, you’ll first want to make sure that you can afford the donations by checking your budget and other financial goals.  It is also important to make sure that your donations are getting used in the way you intended, as not all charities are the same.  A Dime Saved provides many more insights about giving in her Guide to Giving to Charity.

  • Insurance

    Protecting your assets through insurance is an important part of a sound financial plan. The most common types of insurance for individuals cover your vehicles, residence, personal liability, health and life. There are other types of insurance, such as disability, dental, vision, and accidental death & dismemberment, that are most often purchased through your employer but can also be purchased individually.

    As I told my kids, my recommendation is that you buy the highest limits on your insurance that you can afford and don’t buy insurance for things you can afford to lose. For example, if you can afford to pay up to $5,000 every time your home is damaged, you might select a $5,000 deductible on your homeowners policy. Alternately, if you can afford to replace your car if it is destroyed in an accident, you might not buy collision coverage at all. Otherwise, you might set lower deductibles as your goal.

    For each asset in your financial plan, including your life and health which can be considered future sources of income or services, you’ll want to select a strategy for managing the risks of damage to those assets or of liability as a result of having those assets.

    A financial plan includes a list of the types of policies you purchase, the specifics of the coverage provided and insurer, changes you’d like to make to your coverage and your strategy for insurance in the future. You’ll also want to attach copies of either just the declaration pages or your entire policies to your financial plan.

    Car Insurance

    Car insurance can provide coverage for damage to your car, to other vehicles involved in an accident you cause and injuries to anyone involved in an accident. The types of coverages available depend on the jurisdiction in which you live, as some jurisdictions rely on no-fault for determining who has to pay while others rely solely on tort liability.

    Homeowners Insurance

    Homeowners insurance (including renters or condo-owners insurance) provides coverage for damage to your residence (if you own it), damage to your belongings and many injuries to people visiting your residence.

    Umbrella Insurance

    One way to increase the limits of liability on your car and homeowners insurance is an umbrella insurance policy. An umbrella also provides protection against several other sources of personal liability. If you have money in your budget for additional insurance, you might consider purchasing an umbrella policy.

    Health Insurance

    Health insurance is likely to be one of your most expensive purchases, unless your employer pays a significant portion of the cost. Whether you are buying in the open market or through your employer, you are likely to have choices of health insurance plan. Selecting the health insurance plan that best meets your budget and goals can be challenging.

    Life Insurance

    There are many types of life insurance, including term and whole life. Some variations of whole life insurance provide you with options for investing in addition to the death benefit. Once you have compiled the other components of your financial plan, you’ll be better able to assess your need for life insurance. If you have no dependents and no debt, you might not need any. At the other extreme, if you have a lot of debt and one or more dependents, you might want to buy as much coverage as you can afford to ease their financial burden if you die. To learn more specifics about buying life insurance, you might review this post.

    Income Taxes

    Some of your financial decisions will depend on your income tax situation.

    • Do you want your investments to produce a lot of cash income which can increase your current income taxes or focus on appreciation which will usually defer your taxes until a later date?
    • Is a Roth (TFSA) or Traditional (RRSP) plan a better choice for your retirement savings?
    • Are you having too little or too much income taxes withheld from your paycheck?
    • Do you need to pay estimated income taxes?
    • How will buying a house, getting married or having children affect your income taxes?
    • Will moving to another state increase or reduce your income taxes?

     

  • As you consider these and other questions, you’ll want to outline at least a basic understanding of how Federal and local income taxes impact your different sources of income as part of creating a sound financial plan.

    Legal Documents

    Although it is hard to imagine when you are young, at some point in your life you may become incapacitated and will eventually die. There are a number of documents that you can use to ensure that your medical care and assets are managed according to your wishes. You can either include these documents as part of your financial plan or create a list of the documents, the date of the most recent version of each one and where they are located.

    Powers of Attorney

    There are two important types of powers of attorney – medical and financial.

  • A medical power of attorney appoints someone to be responsible for making your medical decisions if you are physically or mentally incapable of doing so. You can supplement a medical power of attorney with a medical directive that is presented to medical personnel before major surgery or by the person appointed to make medical decisions that dictates specifically what is to happen in certain situations.A financial power of attorney appoints someone to be responsible for your finances if you are physically or mentally incapacitated. The financial power of attorney can allow that person to do only a limited number of things, such as pay your bills, or can allow that person to do anything related to your finances.

    Trusts

    There are several forms of trusts that can be used to hold some or all of your assets to make the transition to your beneficiaries easier when you die. Trusts can also be used to hold money for your children either before or after you die. While I am familiar with some types of trusts, I don’t know enough to provide any guidance about them. If you are interested in them, I suggest you research them on line and/or contact a lawyer with expertise in trusts.

    Your Will

    If you die without a will, your state or provincial government will decide how your assets will be divided. In many jurisdictions, your spouse, if you have one, will get some or all of your assets. Your children or parents may also get some of your assets. Most people want more control over the disposition of their assets than is provided by the government.

  • A will is the legal document that allows you to make those specifications. Your will can also identify who will become legally responsible for your minor children or any adult children who are unable to take care of themselves. That responsibility can be split between responsibility for raising your children and responsibility for overseeing any money you leave either to their guardian(s) or for them.

    How to Know When You Need Help

    As you can see, there are a lot of components to a sound financial plan and many of them are interrelated. There are many resources available to help you develop and refine your plan. Many of those resources are free, such as the links to the articles I’ve published on relevant topics. There are also many other sources of information, including personal stories, on line.

    You can also get more personalized assistance. There are many types of financial advisors, a topic I’ll cover in a post soon. Many financial advisors provide a broad array of services, while others specialize in one or two aspects of your financial plan.

    Sources of Advice for a Sound Financial Plan

    The table below lists the types of obstacles you might be facing and the types of advisors that might be able to help you create a sound financial plan.

    ObstaclePossible Advisors
    I can’t figure out how to make a budget or how to set aside money for emergency or designated savings.Bookkeeper, accountant, financial planner
    I can’t make my budget balance.Bookkeeper, accountant, financial planner
    I have more debt that I can re-pay.Financial planner, debt counselor, debt consolidator
    I don’t know what insurance I should buy.Financial planner, insurance agent or, for employer-sponsored health insurance, your employer’s human resource department
    I’m not sure I’m saving enough for retirement.Financial planner
    I have questions about how to invest my savings, including whether I am diversified or need to re-balance my portfolio.Financial planner or stock broker
    I don’t understand how income taxes work.Accountant
    I need help with a Trust, Power of Attorney or Will.Wills & estates lawyer

    Clearly, a financial planner can help with many of these questions, but sometimes you’ll need an advisor with more in depth expertise on one aspect of your financial plan.

Do I Really Need to Budget

Do I Really Need to Budget?

I wrote a guest post for The Smart Investor about deciding if you need a budget.  Here is the start of it, to read the entire post, click here.

Budgeting is critical to your financial health, especially when you are just getting started handling your own money.  A budget will help you figure out whether you can afford to make big purchases – a car, a home – whether you can afford a nice vacation and whether you need to find a way to make more money.  However, not everyone needs to make and stick to a budget.

In this post, I’ll talk about the characteristics of people who will benefit most and least from making a budget and will provide a questionnaire you can use to help figure out . . . Read More

Recovery from Financial Disaster

Recovery from Financial DIsaster

Ever wonder how you’d handle a complete reversal of your finances? I have a friend who had a lifestyle most people would envy and lost everything, including her marriage. I didn’t meet her until after her recovery from her financial disaster. She is one of the most resilient, generous people I know and was kind enough to let me interview her about the changes in her life, the financial lessons she learned and her advice to you on how to avoid finding yourself in a similar situation.

The High Life

“My life was very plentiful with many material objects.

  • 6,000+ square foot custom designed home – 6 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms and two full kitchens
  • Photography and recording studios
  • In ground swimming pool
  • Custom designed furniture
  • Six cars
  • Trips
  • Private education for both kids
  • Entertainment

I never priced groceries, just grab and dash.  We belonged to a private country club as well.  We also had an investment property that we rented to a family member.”

Tell Me about Your Finances

“I did not think of my financial future.  I was in my mid to late 40s and I thought the gravy train would never stop.  We had many investments, 401(k) and IRA retirement accounts for us as well as the children.  My husband was a very successful stock broker, financial planner and money management specialist. We had a dual income, and mine paid for the cream on the top.”

What Happened?

“The stock market along with the real estate market became very soft in 2007.  When I began to notice that these change were imminent, I suggested that we liquidate assets into a strong cash position.  My husband dismissed my thoughts on this topic because I had never been persistent in being a co-manager of our funds.  The economy was showing its ugly powerful head and so was our 40-year marriage.

Things went from bad to worse.  We lost our home. Instead of getting money from the buyer when we sold our house, we had to come to closing with a six-figure check to pay off the mortgage balance (because we owed more than we got for the house). Otherwise, we would have had to negotiate a short sale with the holders of the loan on the house to try to get them to accept only the amount for which we sold it, but chose to close in a traditional manner due to a prideful attitude that made no sense at all.

We divorced.  The money, the investments and the lifestyle were gone.  I was 59 years old. Our children were grown and gone.  Thank God they had their educations!”

What Did You Do?

“I moved into a house with five other people to secure a reasonable rent of $600 a month.  I rolled up my sleeves and decided to re-invent myself as a strong salesperson with a steady stream of income.  As part of creating a fiscally responsible lifestyle, I consolidated my debt and made a conscious effort to understand my taxes and my expenses.  These changes allowed me to pay off the tax liability for which I was half responsible after the divorce.”

What is Your Life like Now?

“My lifestyle now is very simple.

  • I use one credit card.
  • If I can’t afford something, I don’t buy it.
  • I shop at thrift stores, make curtains, paint, have learned some electrical skills and can do just about anything.

Having made the financial changes, I now have the opportunity to travel. I have investments and simple monthly debt. My credit score is very high and I am able to contribute to my savings account and an IRA on a regular basis.”

What Advice Do You Have?

“I learned these financial lessons that might help your readers:

  • Always know your cash position whether or not you are wealthy.
  • Have a good grasp on your finances.  Knowledge is power.
  • Cash is king.
  • Know your financial position at all times.
  • Stay away from credit cards and their incredible interest rates.
  • Save and keep adding to your retirement.”

Closing Thoughts from Susie Q

You’ll notice that my friend’s financial lessons learned are similar to themes you’ve seen in posts I’ve written, especially in the post on advice we gave our kids.

Her story, though, provides real-life insights into why these actions are so important.

You’d never know if you met my friend now that she had to make such a long recovery from financial disaster. She is always upbeat, willing to lend a hand and a great motivator. In fact, she contributed to the initial costs of this blog because she was so thrilled that I am willing to share my knowledge with others to help them be financially literate. I hope I am as resilient as she is if I ever face an equally daunting challenge.

Retirement Savings: How Much Do You Need

Retirement Savings

Retiring is one of the riskiest financial decisions you will make. On the day you retire, you can calculate your net worth. You won’t know, however, how much retirement savings you need because you don’t know:

  • how much you will actually spend on day-to-day expenses
  • how much those expenses will be impacted by inflation
  • whether you’ll have significant medical or other expenses
  • how long you will live or
  • what returns you will earn on your investments.

I retired a little over a year ago and realized that, even though I have a lot of money saved, it wasn’t enough to give me confidence we wouldn’t run out.  I took on a large consulting project to help cover our expenses for the next year or two. Researching this post, though, added even more confidence as we have more than enough to meet some of the simple rules of thumb.   We will see what happens.

In this post, I’ll provide some insights about how to think about a target you might want to set for your retirement savings.  As a follow up, I talk about how much you need to save to meet your retirement savings goal in this post.

4% Rule and Multiply by 25 Rule

As I checked to see what others were saying on this topic, I found a very common theme for determining how much you need to save for retirement.  In some places, it was called the 4% Rule and, in others, the Multiply by 25 Rule.  Being the math geek that I am, my first thought was that 4% = 1/25 so they are the same thing!  It turns out that, in the nitty gritty details, the Multiply by 25 Rule is intended to tell you how much you need to have available on the day you retire while the 4% Rule guides you in how much you can spend in your first year of retirement.  Nonetheless, as explained below, they both result in the same amount needed in savings on your retirement date.

4% Rule for Retirement Spending

The 4% rule is intended to tell you how much you can spend from your retirement savings each year.  Let’s say you have $1,000,000 in invested assets when you retire.  It says you can spend 4% of that amount or $40,000 (including all of your expenses and taxes) in your first year of retirement.  In each subsequent year of your retirement, you can spend $40,000 increased for the cumulative impact of inflation since you retired.   The 4% Rule assumes that you are invested 50% in stocks and 50% in bonds.

4% Rule Illustration

The graph below shows the amount you can spend each year (blue bars which use the left axis scale) and the amount you’ll have remaining at each age (red line which uses the right axis scale) if you retire at 65, inflation is 3% per year, bonds earn 2.5% and stocks earn 7% annually. These assumptions are similar to long-term average assumptions that are common these days.

Spending and savings by year in retirement

As you can see, in this scenario, the amount you can spend increases from $40,000 when you are 65 to almost $100,000 a year when you are 95 solely due to inflation. In the first few years, your spending is less than your investment returns, so your savings increases.  After you turn 72, your savings exceeds your investment returns so your savings starts to decrease.

4% Rule Background

The 4% rule was developed by William Bengen and is presented in detail in a 1994 study published in the Journal of Financial Planning.  (If you like numbers and graphs, check out this paper. It is a surprisingly easy read.)

Using historical data from 1926 to 1991, Bengen found that there were no 50-year periods in which a retiree would run out of money if his or her initial withdrawal rate was 3.5% or lower.  With a 4% initial withdrawal rate, the shortest time period in which the savings ran out was 33 years.  In only 10% of the scenarios did the money last for less than 40 years.

If you turn this rule around and know how much you want to spend in your first year of retirement, say $60,000, you can calculate the amount you need to have saved by dividing that amount by 4% (=0.04).  In this example, you need $1,500,000 (=$60,000/0.04) in savings on the day you retire using this rule.

Multiply by 25 Rule for Retirement Savings

The Multiply by 25 Rule says that the amount you need in retirement savings is 25 times the amount you want to spend in the first year of retirement.  Using the example above in which you want to spend $60,000 in your first year of retirement, you would calculate that you need $1,500,000 (=25 x $60,000) in savings.  As I said, the math is the same for determining how much you need to save because multiplying by 25 is the same as dividing by 0.04.  It is just that the rules are stated from different perspectives (how much you can spend given the amount saved as opposed to how much you need to save giving how much you want to spend).

When do you need more or less?

As indicated, those rules make assumptions that might not be right for you. There are a number of personal factors that impact how much you need in retirement savings.

Your Risk Tolerance

The 4% Rule assumes that you invest half in bonds and half in stocks. Some people are willing to take more risk by investing more heavily in stocks. Other people can’t tolerate the ups and downs of the stock market, so invest more heavily in bonds. As shown in this chart below, taken from my post on diversification and investing, the higher percentage of stocks in your portfolio, the higher your average return (the blue lines) but the more likely you are to lose some of your principal (the portion of the whiskers that fall below 0).

Annual returns on stock/bond portfolios from 1980 to 2018

If you plan to put more than 50% of your retirement assets in stocks, you can withdraw a bit more than 4% each year. Turning that around, it means you need a bit less than 25 times your estimated expenses in your first year of retirement. The table below was copied with permission from a March 19, 2019 article from Schwab found at this link.  It shows how your time horizon (see below) and investment risk impact the 4% Rule.

Probability you wont run out of money with different asset allocations

Life Expectancy and Retirement Age

The analysis underlying the 4% Rule focuses on a retirement period of 30 years.  If you retire in your mid-60s, it would imply that you would most likely have enough money to last through your mid-90s.  If you are in poor health or have a family history of dying early, you could consider spending a bit more than 4% (that is, multiply by less than 25 to determine how much you need to save).

On the other hand, if you plan to retire at 45 and want to have enough money to last until you are 95, you’ll need to save more.  The Schwab table above shows planning horizons up to 30 years.  Based on the numbers in the table, it looks like you could subtract about 0.1 percentage points from the numbers in the 30-year row for each year your planning horizon extends beyond 30 years to estimate how much you need to save.

For example, if you want to be highly confident (90% sure in this case) you will have enough money to last for 50 years, you would be looking at 20 years beyond the 30-year horizon.  Multiplying 20 years by 0.1 percentage point is 2.0%.  According to the table, you can spend 4.2% of your savings in the first year with a Moderately Conservative portfolio and 90% (highly) confident that you won’t run out of money in 30 years.  My approximation would subtract 2.0% from 4.2% to estimate that you could spend about 2.2% of your savings in the first year if you wanted to be 90% confident you won’t run out of money in 50 years.  You could then divide your estimated first year expenses by 2.2% or multiply by 45 to estimate how much you need to save.

Other Sources of Income

Some people’s employers provide defined benefit retirement plans.  These plans generally pay a flat amount every month starting at normal retirement age (as defined by the employer) until death.  In the US, people who have worked or whose spouses have worked are eligible for Social Security benefits, as discussed in this post.  Similarly, Canadians are eligible for Canadian Pension Plan benefits. Many other countries have similar programs.

When you are estimating how much you need to save for retirement, you can consider these sources of income.  If all of your other sources of income increase with inflation, it is a fairly straightforward adjustment.  You just need to subtract the income from these other sources from your first-year-of-retirement expenses before applying the 4% Rule (as adjusted for other considerations).

For example, if you plan to spend $100,000 a year in retirement and have $40,000 of Social Security and defined benefit plan benefits,  you would subtract $40,000 from $100,000 to get $60,000.  Using the Multiply by 25 Rule, you would multiply $60,000 by 25 to get $$1.5 million instead of multiplying the full $100,000 by 25 which would indicate you need $2.5 million in savings.  In this example, you need $1 million less in savings because you have other sources of income.

Unfortunately, most defined benefit plan benefits do not increase with inflation.  The math for adjusting the Multiply by 25 Rule is fairly complicated.  I’ve developed a simple approximation that you can use that will get you close to the correct percentage.  To approximate the adjustment to the amount you Multiply by 25, divide your defined benefit plan income by 2 before subtracting it from your first-year expenses.

You Want to Leave Your Assets to your Beneficiaries

I remember being a teenager and having my father explain to me how much I needed to save for retirement.  The approach he proposed was that you could spend 2% of your assets which is equivalent to a Multiply by 50 Rule.  (No wonder I was nervous about my finances when I retired!)  His logic was as follows:

  • Invest in the stock market and get a 10% return.  (He did this analysis a long time ago, when stock market average returns, inflation and taxes were all considered to be a bit higher than they are today, but not by so much as to make the logic faulty.)
  • You will pay taxes of 40% of your returns, which makes your after-tax return 6%.
  • Inflation will be 4% per year.  Because he wanted his investment income in every year to cover his expenses without dipping into the principal, he had to re-invest 4 percentage points of his investment return so he would have 4% more investment income in each subsequent year.
  • Subtracting the 4% reinvestment from the 6% after-tax return leaves an amount equal to 2% of his investments that he could spend each year (excluding taxes because he separately considered them).

So, if you are like my father, you will want to save closer to 50 times your first-year retirement expenses, rather than 25 times.  It is important to remember that my father’s Multiply by 50 rule applies to your expenses excluding income taxes and the Multiply by 25 Rule applies to your expenses including income taxes, so they aren’t quite directly comparable.

Liquidity of your Assets

As indicated above, the 4% Rule assumes your assets are invested 50% in stocks and 50% in bonds. You may have other assets that contribute to your net worth, such as equity in your home, your personal property, a family farm and rental property, among others. These other assets are all consider illiquid – that is, you can’t convert them to cash easily. Further, some of them are assets that you never want to have to convert to cash to cover expenses, such as your home and personal property.

As you project how much you will have in retirement savings, you’ll want to exclude any equity in your house as it isn’t available to invest.  A portion of it may be available at some point if you plan to downsize, but you’ll want to be cautious about including it in your savings plan.  Other of these assets, such as rental property, could be liquidated to cover retirement expenses.  In your planning, though, you’ll need to make sure you consider the selling costs (e.g., real estate agent’s commission) and taxes you need to pay on capital gains and that they may not generate a return as high as underlies the 4% Rule.

Irregular Large Expenses

The analysis that supports the 4% Rule assumes that you have the same expenses every year and that they change due only to inflation. That’s not how life works! You may want to be like me and want to take an expensive vacation every three or four years in retirement, you’ll likely have to replace your car at least once in retirement or you could have major home repairs if you own your home.  In addition, end-of-life medical bills can be very expensive.

As you are determining your first-year retirement expenses, you’ll want to include amounts for any such expenses in your budget at their average annual cost.  For example, let’s say I want to take a vacation (in addition to my already budgeted travel expenses) every five years that has a total cost of $10,000.  I need to add $2,000 (= $10,000 per vacation divided by one vacation every 5 years) to my regular annual expenses for these big vacations.  Similarly, if I plan to buy a $25,000 car every 15 years, I need to add $1,667 (= $25,000/15) to my annual expenses.  In both cases, you would add these amounts to your budgeted expenses before you divided by 4%.

How to Set Your Personal Target

So, what can you do to estimate your personal retirement savings target? Follow the following steps.

Make a Budget for Today if You Don’t Already Have One

It is hard to estimate your expenses in retirement, but it is very helpful to understand what you are spending today.  If you don’t have a budget or haven’t tracked your expenses to see where your money is going, I suggest starting there.  Here is a link to a post I wrote with a spreadsheet to help you monitor your expenses.

Estimate Your Expenses in Your First Year of Retirement

Next, look at your current budget and/or spending and estimate how it would change if you were retired today.  On what types of things might you want to spend money in the future that you don’t spend now?  Might you want to buy special gifts for your grandchildren that are more extravagant than what you spend for your children’s gifts now?  Also think about expenses you have now that you won’t have in the future, such as commute expenses and possibly a separate wardrobe for work.

Be sure to think about Social Security (or equivalent) and income taxes. In addition to Federal income taxes, you may pay state or provincial and possibly local income taxes.  If you plan to live somewhere else in retirement, it might have a higher or lower tax rate.  In the US, Social Security taxes are 6.2% (12.4% I you are self-employed) of your wages up to the limit ($128,400 in 2019).  As you adjust your budget, you can eliminate Social Security taxes and will want to think about whether your state or provincial and local tax rate will be substantially different from their current rates.

Some people say that your expenses will decrease by 20% when you retire.  In my very short retirement, I find I’m spending more than I expected as I have more time to do things and many of them cost money.  This post from Financial Samurai provide some insights as to how retirement might impact your expenses.

Increase Your Retirement Expenses for Special Purchases

Do you want to travel? How often do you think you’ll need to buy replacement cars and how much do you think you’d spend if you bought one today? What other expenses might you have that aren’t in your budget? For each of these expenses, divide the amount by the time between them to estimate an average annual cost, as I illustrated earlier in this post.

Adjust Your Budget for Inflation

All of the amounts you’ve estimated so far are in today’s dollars.  That is, they reflect the current prices of every item.  You’ll want to increase these amounts for inflation between now and the time you retire.  Over long periods of time, annual inflation has averaged 3% to 3.5% though it has been a bit lower recently.  To adjust your budget for inflation, you’ll want to multiply it by 1.03n, where n is the number of years until you retire.  Don’t like exponents?  The table below provides approximate multipliers by number of years until you plan to retire.

Years51015202530354045
Factor1.151.351.551.802.102.452.803.253.80

Subtract Other Sources of Income

If you think you’ll have a defined pension plan benefit or will receive social insurance (Social Security) benefit, you can subtract those amounts from your inflation-adjusted budget.  My post on Social Security provides insights on how to estimate your benefits for my US readers.

Figure Out your Risk Tolerance and Length of Retirement

If you want to be almost 100% confident you will have enough money to last for your full retirement, regardless of how long it is, and leave most or all of your principal to your heirs, multiply the difference between your inflated budget (excluding income taxes) and other sources of income by 50 to derive your retirement savings target.

If you plan to be retired for only 10 years, you can multiply by a number as low as 10, according to the chart from Schwab. Where between those two numbers you choose is up to you. The longer you expect to be retired, the more conservative your investments and the more confident you want to be that you won’t run out of money, the higher your multiplier.

 

 

The Best Ways to Pay Off Your Debt

The Best Ways to Pay Off Your Debt

The best way to pay off your short-term and revolving debt depends on your priorities and what motivates you.  Two of the common approaches for determining the order in which to re-pay your loans discussed in financial literacy circles are the Debt Snowball and Debt Avalanche approaches.

Both of these methods apply when you have more than one debt that needs to be re-paid.  If you have only one debt to re-pay, the best strategy is to pay it down as quickly as possible, making the minimum payments as often as you can to avoid finance charges which will be added to your principal in addition to the interest charges on any portion of your balance you don’t pay.

In this post, I’ll describe how the two debt-repayment methods work using some illustrations.  I will then help you understand which approach might be better for you.  For more information about the fundamentals of debt, check out my posts on loans and credit cards.

What’s Included and What’s Not

The debts covered by this post include credit cards (one kind of revolving debt), personal loans, car loans and other bills that are overdue. While longer-term loans, such as mortgages, are referenced in the budgeting process, I haven’t included them in the debt re-payment examples. If you have unpaid short-term debt, you’ll want to keep up with the payments on these longer-term loans first, but don’t need to pre-pay them. For this discussion, I will assume that you intend to re-pay all of your debts to your current debtholders. That is, you haven’t dug a hole so deep you need to declare bankruptcy and you don’t feel you’ll benefit from transferring some or all of your high-interest rate loan balances to one with a lower interest (i.e., debt consolidation).

Debt Snowball

Dave Ramsay, a well-known author on financial literacy topics, proposed the Debt Snowball method for paying off your debts.  Under this method, you do the following:

  1. Identify all of your debts, including the amounts of the minimum payments.
  2. Make a budget. (See this post for more on budgeting generally or this one for the first of a step-by-step series on budgeting including a helpful spreadsheet.) Your budget should include all of your expenses excluding your short-term and revolving debts but including the payments you plan to make on your longer-term debts (e.g., car loans and mortgages).
  3. Determine the total amount left in your budget available to re-pay your debts, remembering that you need to be able to pay for the total cost of all of your current purchases before you start paying off the balances on your existing debt. If the amount available to re-pay debts is less than the total of your minimum payments, you may need to look into your options to consolidate or re-structure your debts, get them forgiven or declare bankruptcy.
  4. Otherwise, make the minimum payment on all of your debts except the smallest one.
  5. Take everything left over in your budget from step (3) and reduce it by the sum of the minimum payments in step (4). Use that balance to pay off your smallest debt. After you fully re-pay the smallest debt, you’ll apply the remainder to the next smallest debt and so on.

Debt Avalanche

The Debt Avalanche method is very similar to the Debt Snowball method, except you re-pay your debts in a different order.

The first three steps under the Debt Avalanche method are the same as the first three steps under the Debt Snowball method.  It differs from the Debt Snowball method in that you pay the minimum payment on all of your debts except the one with the highest interest rate at any given time instead of the one with the smallest balance.

Examples

I’ve created the two examples to compare the two methods.  In both examples, I have assumed that you use a different credit card or pay cash for all new purchases until your current credit card balances are re-paid.  That is, to make progress on getting out of debt, you need to not only make extra payments on your existing debts, but also not create additional debt by borrowing to pay for new purchases.  It’s tough!

Example 1

In this example, you have two debts with the balances due, interest rates and minimum payments shown in the table below.

Example 1Balance DueInterest RateMinimum Payment
Debt 1$1,50020%$30
Debt 250010%10

You have determined you have  $100 available to pay off these two debts.  The minimum payments total $40 in this example, so you have $60 available to pay off more of the principal on your debts.

Example 1: Debt Snowball

Under the Debt Snowball method, you will use the additional $60 a month you have to pay off Debt 2 first, as it has the smaller balance.  That is, you will pay the minimum payment of $30 a month on Debt 1 and $70 a month on Debt 2 for 8 months, at which point Debt 2 will be fully re-paid.  You will then apply the full $100 a month to Debt 1 for the next 17 months until it is fully re-paid

Under this approach, you will have fully re-paid both debts in 25 months and will pay $428 in interest charges.

Example 1:  Debt Avalanche

In Example 1, you will use the additional $60 a month you have to pay off Debt 1 first under the Debt Avalanche method, as it has the higher interest rate, whereas you used the additional amount to pay off Debt 2 first under the Debt Snowball method.  That is, you will pay the minimum balance of $10 a month on Debt 2 and $90 a month on Debt 1 for 20 months, at which point Debt 1 will be fully re-paid.  You will then apply the full $100 a month to Debt 2 for the next 4 months until it is fully re-paid

Under this approach, you will have fully re-paid both debts in 24 months and will pay $352 in interest charges.

Example 2

In this example, you have five debts with the balances due, interest rates and minimum payments shown in the table below.

Example 2Balance DueInterest RateMinimum Payment
Debt 1$1,00010%$40
Debt 25000%25
Debt 310,00020%100
Debt 43,00015%75
Debt 57505%30

You have $500 available to pay off these debts.  In this example, the minimum payments total $270, so you have $230 available to pay off the principal on your debts in addition to the principal included in the minimum payments.

Example 2: Debt Snowball

Example 2 is a bit more complicated because there are more debts.  As a reminder, under this approach, you apply all of your extra payments ($230 in this example) to the smallest debt at each point in time.  In this example, you will make the additional payments on your debts in the following order:

Debt 2

Debt 5

Debt 1

Debt 4

Debt 3

It takes only two months to pay off Debt 2 and another four months to pay off Debt 4.  As such, you will have fully re-paid two of your debts in six months.  In total, it will take 43 months to re-pay all of your loans and you will pay $5,800 in interest.

Example 2:  Debt Avalanche

In this example, you will make the additional payments on your debts in the following order:

Debt 3

Debt 4

Debt 1

Debt 5

Debt 2

It turns out that Debt 2 is fully re-paid in 20 months even just making the minimum payments.  Debt 5 is paid off 7 months later again with only minimum payments, followed by Debt 1 2 months later.  As each of these debts is re-paid, the amounts of their minimum payments are added to the payment on Debt 3 until it is fully re-paid after 39 months.  At that point, the full $500 a month is applied towards Debt 4 which then takes only 2 additional months to fully re-pay.  In total, it will take 41 months to re-pay all of your loans and you will pay $5,094 in interest.

Comparison

Dollars and Sense – Two Examples

Looking at the two examples, we can get a sense for how much more interest you will pay if you use the Debt Snowball method instead of the Debt Avalanche method.  The table below compares the two methods under both examples.

Example 1Example 2
Interest PaidMonths of PaymentsInterest PaidMonths of Payments
Snowball$42825$5,80043
Avalanche352245,09441
Difference7417062

In these two examples, you pay more than 10% more interest if you use the Debt Snowball method than the Debt Avalanche method, leading to one or two additional months before your debts are fully re-paid.

Dollars and Sense – In General

The difference in the amount of additional interest depends on whether your debts are similar in size and the differences in the interest rates.  I’ll take that statement apart to help you understand it.

  • If the debt with the lower interest rate is very small, you will pay it off quickly.  As a result, there is only a very short period of time during which you are paying the higher interest on the larger loan under the Debt Snowball method.  As such, there will be very little difference in the total amount of interest paid between the two methods in that case.
  • If the debts all have about the same interest rate, it doesn’t really matter which one you re-pay first, as the interest charges on that first loan will be very similar to the interest charges on your other loans.

Dollars and Sense – Illustration

The graph below illustrates the impact of the differences in interest rates and sizes of two loans on the difference in the total interest paid.  To create this graph, I took different variations of Example 1.  That is, you have two loans with outstanding balances totaling $2,000 and the interest rate on the larger debt is 20%.

 

Interest saved using debt avalanche as compared to debt snowball

How to Read the Axes

The interest rate on the smaller loan was calculated as 20% minus the increment shown on the axis labeled on the right.  That is, the interest rate on the smaller loan for scenarios near the “front” of the graph was 18% or 2 percentage points lower than the 20% interest rate on the larger loan.  Near the “back” of the graph, the interest rate on the smaller loan is 0% or 20 percentage points lower than the interest rate on the larger loan.

The loan balance on the smaller loan divided by the total debt amount of $2,000 is shown on the axis that goes from left to right.  The small loan is $40 (2% of $2,000) at the far left of the graph and increases as you move to the right to $960 (48% of $2,000) on the far right.  Note that, if the small loan exceeded $1,000, it would have become the bigger loan!

The Green Curve

The green curve corresponds to the total interest paid using the Debt Snowball method minus the total interest paid using the Debt Avalanche method.  For example, at the front left, corresponding to the small loan being $40 with an 18% (=20% – 2%) interest rate, there is a $2 difference in the amount of interest paid.  At the other extreme, in the back right of the graph (0% interest rate on a small loan with a balance of $960), you will pay $167 more in interest ($308 versus $140 or more than twice as much) if you use the Debt Snowball method rather than the Debt Avalanche method.

What It Means

Interestingly, moving along only one axis – that is, only decreasing the interest rate on the small loan or only increasing the size of the smaller loan – doesn’t make very much difference.  In the back left and front right, the interest rate differences are only $15 and $22, respectively.  The savings from the Debt Avalanche method becomes most important when there is a large difference in the interest rates on the loans and the outstanding balances on the loans are similar in size.

Sense of Accomplishment

For many people, debt is an emotional or “mental-state” issue rather than a financial problem.  In those situations, it is more important to gain a sense of accomplishment than it is to save money on interest.  If you are one of those people  and have one or more small debts that you can fully re-pay fairly quickly (such as Debts 2 and 5 in Example 2 both of which were paid off in six months under the Debt Snowball method), using the Debt Snowball method is likely to be much more successful.

Key Points

Here are the key points from this post:

  • A budget will help you figure out how much you can afford to apply to your debts each month.
  • If you can’t cover your minimum payments, you’ll need to consider some form of consolidation, re-financing or even bankruptcy, none of which are covered in this post.
  • If you have only one debt to re-pay, the best strategy is to pay it down as quickly as possible, but making the minimum payments as often as you can to avoid finance charges.
  • You will always pay at least as much, and often more, interest when you use the Debt Snowball method as compared to the Debt Avalanche method.
  • Unless you have two or more debts that are all about the same size and have widely varying interest rates, the total interest you will pay is essentially the same regardless of the order in which you re-pay them.  As such, if the sense of accomplishment you get from paying off a few debts will help keep you motivated, using the Debt Snowball method may be the right choice for you.
  • If you have two or more debts that are all about the same size and have disparate interest rates, you will want to use the Debt Avalanche Approach.  Because the balances are all about the same, it will take about the same amount of time to re-pay the first loan regardless of which loan you choose to re-pay first!  As such, it is better to focus on the interest you will save by using the Debt Avalanche approach.

 

6 Ways to Slay Your Student Debt This Year

6 Ways to Slay Your Student Debt This Year

From Susie Q: I’m not as familiar with student debt as I am with the other topics on which I write, so was pleased to accept this guest post from Kate Underwood.  Kate is a freelance writer and staff writer for Club Thrifty, a website dedicated to helping people dream big, spend less, and travel more.  With Kate’s permission and approval, I’ve interspersed some comments and numerical examples in italics to expand on a few of her points.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’re probably aware that we’ve got a bit of a student loan crisis on our hands. The amount currently owed by borrowers isn’t in the billions…nope, it’s actually past the $1 trillion mark!

Chances are, you don’t want to be saddled with your own student debt forever. Debt can hold you back from buying a home, starting a family, traveling the world, and other exciting parts of life. Don’t let student loans ruin your dreams – it’s time to start slaying your student debt this year.

Think it’s impossible? Check out the following ways to attack your student loans with a vengeance.

Follow A Budget

A budget is an essential financial tool that gives a job to every dollar you earn. Get yourself on track by making and following a smart budget. Be sure to account for all necessary expenses, including your student loan payments.

Balance out how much you’re earning with how much you’re spending (and don’t spend money you don’t have). When you’re stuck with student loan debt, it’s key to eliminate luxury spending. Put every spare dollar, after necessities, into paying off your loans.

While it’s tempting to overspend when you get your first “real” job, it’s a bad move. Don’t make the mistake of financing new cars or spending too much on stuff you don’t need. Living within – or below – your means could make a big dent in your student debt. Just live like a college kid for a little longer.

Susie Q adds: For a more detailed discussion of how budgets can be helpful, check out this post or start here for my week-by-week guidance on creating a budget using a spreadsheet template I’ve provided.

Trust me, it’ll be worth it! The faster you pay off your loans, the sooner you can get started building wealth and planning for your next big goal!

Start Repayment Right Away

That little grace period from your lender is appealing, but don’t hang out there too long. The sooner you can begin repayment, the better.

Even during the grace period, interest accrues for many types of loans. So, while you’re allowed to postpone repayment for a time (usually 6 months), it’s prudent to begin repayment as soon as possible.

Susie Q adds: As an example, if you have a $30,000 balance on a 5% loan with 15 years left in the term and don’t defer your payments during the grace period, your payments will be $237 a month. You’ll pay a total of $12,703 in interest over the life of the loan. If you make the same payments and defer your loan, you’ll pay an extra $1,628 in interest payments and extend your loan by 13 months (6 months of grace period and 7 months of extra payments to cover the extra interest).

Pay Extra Each Month

Once you know what your minimum payment amount is every month, don’t get too comfy with it. If you push yourself to increase that amount by even $25 or $50 more each month, you could destroy those loans much faster! At the very least, round up to the nearest $10 or $50 mark. So, a minimum payment of $62 could be rounded up to $70 or $100.

Just be sure that, if you’re making extra payments, they’re applied to the principal, not the interest. If you’re in doubt, talk directly to your lender or loan provider to find out how you can go about doing this.

Susie Q adds: Using the same example as above, if you don’t defer your loan for the grace period and round up to $250 a month, you’ll save over $1,000 as you’ll pay only $11,676 in interest and will pay off your loan a full year earlier.   You can include your student debt in your debt repayment strategy to figure out how much you can pre-pay each month, as discussed in this post.

Another tip: make biweekly payments rather than monthly. After one year, this simple step will add up to having slashed an extra month’s payment off your total. However you choose to set it up, paying more than the minimum will lead to student loan freedom sooner!

Refinance Your Loans

One strategy for paying off your loans faster is to refinance your student loans. The general idea is that if you refinance to a lower interest rate, you’ll end up paying less over the life of the loan. Plus, you can pay them off faster, since you won’t owe as much in interest! Win-win!

A couple of factors to beware of: you usually don’t want to refinance if your credit score has taken a recent hit. That will likely only get you a higher interest rate – you definitely don’t want that! Also, if you plan on utilizing student loan forgiveness programs, you typically need to stay away from refinancing. Most of the forgiveness programs will disqualify you if you’ve refinanced.

If you’re unsure about how to go forward with refinancing, Credible is an online loan marketplace that can make that decision easier. Compare interest rates for which you may qualify with different lenders in order to make the best choice.

Susie Q adds: Using the same example as above, if you are able to re-finance your loan at 3.5% and continue to make the same $237-a-month payment, you’ll save over $5,000 as you’ll pay only $7,485 in interest and will pay off your loan almost two years earlier. This savings will be offset by any fees you need to pay when you re-finance your loan.

Now, if you’re such a rock star that you plan to pay off the full balance within a really short time, like 2 or 3 years, refinancing might not be worth the trouble. Just pay those babies off and be done with them!

Start A Side Hustle

One of the best ways to pay off any debt fast is to increase your income. I’m a big proponent of side hustles. You can make extra cash to pay down debt and side hustles are often super flexible with your other responsibilities.

If you’re looking to begin your own side hustle, you can check out these work-from-home jobs and see which might be a good fit. The possibilities are nearly limitless, so be creative and think about your skills and things you enjoy doing anyway.

You could start doing freelance writing or blogging from home (our favorites!). Or start selling your to-die-for cakes for special occasions. Try your hand at bookkeeping, photography, or proofreading or any number of other ways people are raising their income.

Susie Q adds: For more ideas about ways to increase income or reduce expenses to help free up money to reduce your student loan debt, check out this post. Also, if you decide to pursue a side hustle, you’ll want to make sure you don’t spend more money than you earn!

Just imagine how much extra money you could throw at your student debt by starting a side hustle!

Use Employer Benefits

Some companies are looking to build positive relationships with employees by offering student loan repayment assistance. So, before you decide to take a job, it might be beneficial to ask if it offers this option. If you’ve already signed on to work somewhere, talk to your HR department to see if it’s available.

You should also explore various government student loan forgiveness programs. Though it’s extremely important to follow all of their rules to be eligible, if you’re working in a career field that allows you loan forgiveness, you might as well go for it!

A piece of advice: save enough during your repayment period that you could pay the entire loan balance off just in case the forgiveness doesn’t come through! Most applications for forgiveness so far have been rejected, so those borrowers are still on the hook for the full balance.

Say Goodbye to Student Loans Fast

Debt sucks. You know you don’t want to keep your student loans around forever, so use any and all of these tips to slay your student debt as fast as you can!

 

 

 

How to Budget Step 9 – Monitoring your Budget

How to Budget: Monitoring Your Expenses

You may have thought you were done when you created and balanced your budget.  However, there is one very important step left in the budgeting process – making sure you are living within the guidelines set by your budget, i.e., monitoring your budget.  That is, are you earning as much income as you planned? Are you limiting your expenses to the amounts in your budget?  Did you put aside the savings you included in your budget, whether for expenses you pay infrequently, for retirement or something in between?

In this post, I’ll tell you how to use a new, budget-monitoring worksheet to compare your budget with your actual income and expenses.

Entering Your Budget

Since the purpose of the spreadsheet is to compare your actual expenses with your budget, the first thing to do is to enter your budget.  Most people find it easiest to monitor their budget on a monthly basis, even if they created an annual budget.  If you created an annual budget, you’ll want to divide all of the values in your budget by 12.

Once you have your monthly budget, you’ll enter it on the Budget Monitoring tab of the budget-monitoring spreadsheet at the link below.  Note that this spreadsheet is different from the one you used to track your expenses and create your budget, though many aspects of it will work the same as the budget creation spreadsheet (named Budget Template).

Enter Your Category Names

To enter your budget, enter the names of the categories from your budget in Column A starting in Row 8. Here are three different ways you can input your category names:

  1. Type the names directly into Column A.
  2. Use Excel’s copy and paste features to copy them from your Budget Template spreadsheet.
    1. On the Budget tab in your Budget Template spreadsheet, highlight all of your category names by putting your cursor on cell A11, holding down the shift key and moving the down arrow until all of them are highlighted. Let go of the shift key.
    2. Hold down the Ctrl key while you hit C or hit the copy button if you have one.
    3. Go to the Budget Comparison tab of the monitoring spreadsheet.
    4. Put your cursor in A8.
    5. Hold down the Alt key while you hit E, S and V or hit the paste-values button if you have one. If you just use a regular paste button, you will get errors because the cells from which you are copying have formulas in them.
  3. Link your monitoring spreadsheet to your Budget Template spreadsheet.
    1. Put your cursor in A8 of the Budget Comparison tab of your Budget Monitoring spreadsheet.
    2. Hit the equal sign on your keyboard.
    3. Go to the Budget Template spreadsheet.
    4. Go to the Budget tab.
    5. Put your cursor in A11.
    6. Hit Enter.
    7. Excel should return you to cell A8 of your Budget Monitoring spreadsheet.
    8. Hit the F2 (edit) key.
    9. Hit the F4 key 3 times. Hit Enter. There should now be no $ in the cell reference.
    10. Copy the formula in A8 and paste it in as many cells in Column A as needed until all of your category names appear.

When you enter the category names, make sure that the row with the total amount of income is called “Total Income,” the row with the expense total is called “Total Expenses,” and the difference between those two values is called “Grand Total.”

Enter Your Budget Amounts

Next, enter the monthly budget amounts in Column B next to each of the category names in Column A. You can use any of the three approaches described above for the category names. If you have an annual budget, you’ll need to divided the values by 12 before copying them if you use the second approach or add “/12” (without the quotes) in step (i) before you hit enter if you use the third approach.

Entering Your Actual Income and Expenses

You can enter your actual income and expenses using the same instructions as were used for entering them in the Budget Template spreadsheet.  See my posts on tracking expenses and paychecks and income for more details or review the instructions at the top of each tab.  Be sure to use the same category names as you used in your budget so all of your income and expenses will be included in the Actual column on the Budget Comparison tab.

For monitoring your actual income and expenses, you don’t need to enter the number of times per year you receive each type of income or pay each bill since your goal is compare what you actually received and paid with your budget.

Options for Expenses You Don’t Pay Monthly

Here are three different ways to monitor expenses that you don’t pay monthly:

  1. Enter them in the Monitoring Spreadsheet as you pay them and keep them in mind as known variances from your budget each month. This approach is the easiest to implement but also the least helpful for comparing your actual expenses to your budget.
  2. Adjust the budget amounts to reflect the amount of those expenses you expect to pay in each month. For example, if you pay your car insurance bill four times a year in March, June, September and December, you would
    • take your budget amount
    • adjust it to a full year if you budgeted on a monthly basis by multiplying by 12
    • divide the annual amount by 4
    • include the result in your budget for March, June, September and December
    • put 0 in your budget column in all other months

This approach is a little more complicated to implement, but will make comparing actual expenses with your budget much easier.

  1. Add an expense transaction every month equal to 1/12thof your annual expense on the Bank Transactions, Cash Transactions or Credit Card Transactions tab. In the months in which you actually make the payment, you’ll enter 1/12th of your actual annual expense.  If the total of the amounts you set aside in previous months differs from the amount you actually pay, you’ll need to include this difference in the actual payment amount in the month you make the payment. This approach is equivalent to moving money from your checking account to your savings account in every month you don’t have this expense and moving it back to your checking account in the month in which you pay the expense.

You can also use any one of the above approaches for income you don’t receive monthly.  If you use the third approach, you’ll put 1/12th of your actual annual income on the Income tab.

Monitoring Your Budget – What Happens When Your Actual Isn’t as Good as Your Budget

There are many reasons why your actual income and expenses might look worse than your budget.  You may have been planning to work overtime or get a second job to increase your income.  Those lifestyle changes can be challenging, so you might not have done them.

More likely, you spent more than you budgeted, either due to an emergency, an impulse purchase or difficulty in breaking long-standing habits.  Emergencies happen to everyone.  If possible, you’ll want to include building or re-building your emergency savings (see this post for more on that topic) in your budget. While overspending your budget can be problematic, especially if you do it continuously, don’t be too hard on yourself. Changing your spending habits is really hard.

A Few More Words about Budget

Congratulations!  You made it through the entire budgeting process. As I said in my first post on budgeting, staying on a budget is like being on a diet.  Just as every calorie counts, so does every dollar spent.  Sticking to your budget will increase the likelihood you will meet your financial goals, so do your best!

Download Budgeting Monitoring Spreadsheet Here

How to Budget Step 8 – Refining your Budget

Refining Your Budget

Very few people have a balanced budget on the first try.  This week, I’ll talk about how to refine your preliminary budget if it isn’t in balance.  I have been very fortunate in that it has been a long time since I found it challenging to meet my financial goals.  Also, I don’t know the specifics of any of your budgets, life-styles or financial goals. So, in this post, I will identify the changes you can make to refine your budget at a high level and provide links to articles by other financial literacy bloggers that provide a whole host of ideas on the specifics.  I hope that one or more of those articles will provide you with the ideas you need to successfully balance your budget.

The Bottom Line

The number on which you’ll want to focus is the Grand Total on the Budget tab.  If it is close to zero (i.e., within a percent or two of your total income) and you have incorporated all of your financial goals, you are done.  Otherwise, you’ll want to look at the section below that reflects your situation, i.e., whether the Grand Total is positive or negative, to learn how to refine your budget.

Your Budget Shows a Large Positive Balance

Congratulations!  If the value in the Grand Total line of the Budget tab shows a large positive number, you have more income than you are spending and saving.  You are among the fortunate few.

Before spending your excess income, you might want to review your financial goals.   Questions you could ask yourself include:

  • Do I have emergency savings of three to six months of expenses?
  • Are there other large purchases I’d like to make in the future?
  • Do I have enough savings to take maternity/paternity leave?
  • If you have children, am I saving for their education?
  • Have I studied the full costs of retirement and am I saving enough?
  • Have I contributed the maximum amounts to all of my tax-advantaged retirement savings accounts (IRAs and 401(k)s in the US, RRSPs and TFSAs in Canada)?
  • Do I want to retire sooner (which would require more savings now)?

If you still have a positive balance after your review, you can consider increasing your discretionary expenses (possibly a newer car or a nice vacation or the addition of a regular treat).  Of course, there is never any harm in increasing your savings.

Your Budget Shows a Large Negative Balance

A large negative balance is much more common than a large positive balance.  I wish I could give you a magic answer to resolve this situation, but there are really only three options.

  • Increase your income.
  • Decrease your expenses.
  • Borrow money either from a third party or by drawing down your savings.

Unless absolutely necessary, I suggest avoiding the third option.  If your expenses exceed your income and you make up the difference by borrowing either from your savings or a third party, you are likely to have a worse problem next year.  Unless either your income or expenses change, it can lead to a downward spiral.

Increase Your Income

Increasing your income can be a more effective way to balance your budget.  However, it has its own challenges and often requires a significant investment of your time and/or money.   Examples of ways to increase your income include:

  • Get a part time job, but make sure it won’t jeopardize your primary job.
  • Work overtime if you are eligible.
  • Make sure you are earning a competitive wage by looking at relevant salary surveys. If you aren’t, ask your boss for a raise, such as described in this post, or look for another job in your field that pays more or offers more benefits.
  • Consider getting more education that will provide you with the opportunity to make more money in the future. Some employers will pay for some or all of your tuition if the additional education is related to your job.  This choice is likely to cause more pain in the short term, but can produce large benefits.  As an example, check out this post.
  • Sell things that you don’t need. Here is a  post on this topic.
  • Start your own business. This option is one that I suggest you pursue only very cautiously if you already have a tight budget.  Starting a business can be very expensive, which of course will put further pressure on your budget.  Also, a large percentage of new businesses fail which means the owners lose money. According to Investopedia, 30% of business fail within two years of opening and 50% fail within five years.  Of those that survive, one source indicates that many business don’t make money until the third year.  If you want to start a side business, turning a hobby into a business is one of the most fun ways to do so.  Here is an article with some suggestions on how to do so.
  • There are hundreds of articles about “side hustles.” I’ve provided a few examples. There are lots of pitfalls with side hustles, including many that might end up costing you money rather than making it. So, as with starting your own business, I suggest exercising caution if you decide to proceed with one or more of them.

Decrease Your Expenses

To be blunt, it is hard to decrease your expenses.  Here are some tips on things to consider:

  • Separate your discretionary expenses from your required expenses. Required expenses include the cost of basic housing, a basic car, gas, groceries, medical care, insurance and the like.  Discretionary expenses are things you could live without, even if you don’t want to.  Here are several posts I’ve seen that provide ideas on how to cut back on discretionary expenses.
  • Review the amount you pay for your necessities to see if you can reduce any of these costs. Here are several posts that provide some ideas.
    • 40 Smart Ways to Reduce Your Monthly Bills
    • 5 Ways To Save $532.30 On A Tight Budget
    • This post focuses specifically on your cell phone bill.
    • This post discusses your energy costs.
    • I really like this post as it covers one of my biggest areas of savings – cooking at home instead of in restaurants. Here is another variation on the same theme.
    • Figure out how much you are spending to pay off your debts, particularly if you have a lot of credit card debt. Research ways to re-finance your debt to reduce interest rate or, if necessary, lengthen time to payment.  For example, if you have something you can use as collateral, a collateralized loan will have a much lower interest rate than your credit cards. See my post on loans to understand the factors that affect the interest rate on a loan and the sensitivity of your monthly payments to changes in interest rates and term.  This post has a lot of great information on re-paying student loans. I also like this post which talks about refinancing student loans – are you ready for it and some options.
    • There are dozens (hunderds?) of blogs on FIRE (Financial Independence, Retire Early). These bloggers tend to post their personal stories about how they are living very frugally so they can retire very early.  Although many of their approaches seem almost draconian, reading one of more of their posts might give you some ideas how you can cut back on your expenses.

There are a few other expenses you can adjust to balance your budget, but I suggest you do them only after you have fine-tuned your budget and looked into re-financing your debt.

  • Reduce the amount you set aside for savings. Clearly, covering the basics, such as food and shelter, take priority over meeting your longer-term financial goals.   Once you have covered those expenses, you’ll need to balance your short-term wants with your long-term goals.  For example, you’ll need to decide whether you want to spend more today on entertainment or put more into your savings so you can have the retirement you desire. The idea of foregoing things today to the benefit of something you will get in the future is called delay of gratification.  It is a difficult concept to implement in practice but is often a key to long-term financial success.
  • Avoid taking on too much more risk. For example, one way to save money on insurance (cars, homeowners/renters or health) is to increase your deductible, lower your limit of liability or, in the case of car insurance, not purchase physical damage coverage.  As I discussed in my post on making financial decisions, these choices reduce your upfront cost, but can have serious consequences in an adverse situation.  If your budget is tight, you may not be able to afford to pay your full share of costs in the case of a serious accident, damage to your home or serious illness.

Closing Thoughts

Working to refine your budget to bring it in balance can be a real challenge. If you can’t do it on the second or third try, be patient with yourself. Learning to be financially responsible is often a long, challenging process.