Annual Retirement Savings Targets

Once you know how much you want to save for retirement, you need a plan for building that savings.  Your annual retirement savings target depends on your total savings target, how many years you have until you want to retire and how much risk you are willing to take in your portfolio.  In this post, I’ll provide information you can use to set targets for how much to contribute to your retirement savings each year.

Key Variables

There are several variables that will impact how much you’ll want to target as contributions to your retirement savings each year.  They are:

  • Your total retirement savings target.
  • How much you already have saved.
  • The number of years you are able to contribute to your retirement savings.
  • How much risk you are willing to take in your portfolio.
  • The impact of taxes on investment returns between now and your retirement. That is, what portion of your retirement savings will be in each of taxable accounts, tax-deferred retirement savings accounts and tax-free retirement savings accounts.  For more information on tax-deferred and tax-free retirement savings accounts, check out this post.  I provide a bit more insight on all three types of accounts in these posts on how to choose which assets to buy in which type of account in each of the US and Canada.

Some of these variables are fairly straightforward.  For example, you can check the balances of any accounts with retirement savings that you already have and you can estimate (within a few years, at least) how many years until you retire.

Other variables are more challenging to estimate.  For example, I dedicated a whole separate post to the topic of setting your retirement savings target.

Your Risk Tolerance

Your risk tolerance is a measure of how much volatility you are willing to take in your investments.  As indicated in my post on risk, the more risk you take the higher your expected return but the wider the possible range of results.  My post on diversification and investing shows that the longer period of time over which you invest, the less volatility has been seen historically in the annualized returns.

Here are a few thoughts that might guide you as you figure out your personal risk tolerance.

  • If you have only a few years until you retire, you might want to invest fairly conservatively. By investing conservatively, you might want to invest in money market or high-yield savings accounts that currently have yields in the 1.75% to 2% range.
  • If you have five to ten years until you retire or are somewhat risk averse (i.e., can’t tolerate the ups and downs of the stock market), you might want to invest primarily in bonds (discussed in this post) or bond mutual funds. Depending on the maturity, US government bonds are currently yielding between 1.5% and 2% and high-quality corporate bonds are currently returning between 2.5% and 4%.
  • If you have a longer time period to retire and/or are able to tolerate the volatility of equities, you might invest in an S&P 500 index fund or an index fund that is even more risky. These funds have average annual returns of 8% or more.

As can be seen, the more risk you take, the higher the average return.  As you are estimating how much you need to save each year for retirement, you’ll need to select an assumption about your average annual investment return based on these (or other) insights and your personal risk tolerance.

Taxability of Investment Returns

In addition to considering your risk tolerance, you’ll need to adjust your investment returns for any taxes you need to pay between the time you put the money in the account and your retirement date.  For this post, I’ve assumed that your savings amount target includes income taxes, as suggested in my post on that topic.  If it does, you only need to be concerned with taxes until you retire in estimating how much you need to save each year.

In the previous section, you selected an average annual investment return.  The table below provides approximations for adjusting that return for Federal income taxes based on the type of financial instruments you plan to buy and the type of account in which you hold it.

US – Taxable

Canada – Taxable

All Tax-Deferred & Tax-Free Accounts

Money Market

Multiply by 0.75

Multiply by 0.75

No adjustment

Bonds and Bond Mutual Funds

Multiply by 0.75

Multiply by 0.75

No adjustment

Equity Mutual Funds

Multiply by 0.85

Multiply by 0.87

No adjustment

Equities and Index Funds

Multiply by 0.85

Multiply by 0.87

No adjustment

Further Refinements to Tax Adjustments

You’ll need to subtract your state or provincial income tax rate from each multiplier. For example, if you state or provincial income tax rate is 10%, you would subtract 0.10 from each multiplier. For Equities and Index Funds, the 0.85 multiplier in the US-Taxable column would be reduced to 0.75.

The assumptions in this table for equities and index funds in particularly and, to a lesser extent, equity mutual funds, are conservative.  Specifically, if you don’t sell your positions every year and re-invest the proceeds, you will pay taxes less than every year.  By doing so, you reduce the impact of income taxes.  Nonetheless, given all of the risks involved in savings for retirement, I think these approximations are useful even if they cause the estimates of how to save every year to be a bit high.

Also, the tax rates for bonds and bond mutual funds could also be conservative depending on the types of bonds you own.  The adjustment factors shown apply to corporate bonds.  The tax rates on interest on government bonds and some municipal bonds are lower.

Calculation of After-Tax Investment Return

From the table above, it is clear that calculating your after-tax investment return depends on both the types of investments you plan to buy and the type of account in which you plan to hold them.  The table below will help you calculate your overall after-tax investment return.

Investment Type

Account Type

Percent of Portfolio Pre-tax Return Tax Adjustment

Product

Money Market, Bonds or Bond Mutual Funds

Taxable

0.75

Equity Mutual Funds, Equities, Index Funds

Taxable

0.85 if US; 0.87 if Canada

All

Other than Taxable

1.00

Total

There are three assumptions you need to enter into this table that reflect the types of financial instruments you will buy (i.e., reflecting your risk tolerance) and the types of accounts in which you will hold those assets in the Percent of Portfolio column.  These assumptions are the percentages of your retirement savings you will invest in:

  • Money markets, bonds or mutual funds in taxable accounts.
  • Equities, equity mutual funds and index funds in taxable accounts.
  • Tax-deferred or tax-free accounts (IRAs, 401(k)s, RRSPs and TFSAs).

For each of these three groups of assets, you’ll put the average annual return you selected from the Risk Tolerance section above in the Pre-Tax return column.  You also may need to adjust the multipliers as discussed above.

Once you have filled in those six boxes, you will multiply the three numbers in each row together to get a single product in the last column of each row.  Your weighted average after-tax investment return will be the sum of the three values in the last column.

Illustration of Weighted Average Return Calculation

I have created an illustration in the table below.  For this illustration, I have assumed that you will invest 50% of your portfolio in bonds and 50% in equities.  You are able to put 60% of your portfolio in tax-deferred and tax-free accounts.  Although not consistent with my post on tax-efficient investing, you split your bonds and stocks between account types in the same proportion as the total.  As such, you have 20% of your portfolio in taxable accounts invested in each of bonds and equities.  The 60% you put in your tax-deferred and tax-free accounts goes in the All Other row.

Investment Type

Account Type

Percent of Portfolio Pre-tax Return Tax Adjustment

Product

Money Market, Bonds or Bond Mutual Funds

Taxable

20% 3% 0.75

0.5%

Equity Mutual Funds, Equities, Index Funds

Taxable

20% 8% 0.85 if US; 0.87 if Canada

1.4%

All

Other than Taxable

60% 5.5% 1.00

3.3%

Total

5.2%

I’ll use a pre-tax return on bonds of 3% and equities of 8%.  Because the All Other category is 50/50 stocks and bonds, the average pre-tax return for that row is the average of 3% and 8% or 5.5%.

I then calculated the products for each row.  For example, in the first row, I calculated 0.5% = 20% x 3% x 0.75.  The weighted average after-tax investment return is the sum of the three values in the product column or 5.2% = 0.5% + 1.4% + 3.3%.  The 5.2% will be used to help estimate how much we need to save each year to meet our retirement savings target.

Annual Savings Targets

By this point, we have talked about how to estimate:

  • Your total retirement savings target
  • The number of years until you retire
  • An after-tax investment return that is consistent with your risk tolerance and the types of accounts in which you plan to put your savings

With that information, you can now estimate how much you need to save each year if you don’t have any savings yet.  I’ll talk about adjusting the calculation for any savings you already have below.

I assumed that you will increase your savings by 3% every year which would be consistent with saving a constant percentage of your earnings each year if your wages go up by 3% each year.  For example, if you put $1,000 in your retirement savings this year, you will put another $1,030 next year, $1,061 in the following year and so on.  In this way, your annual retirement savings contribution will be closer to a constant percentage of your income.

Annual Savings/Total Target

The graph and table below both show the same information – the percentage of your retirement savings goal that you need to save in your first year of savings based on your number of years until you retire and after-tax annual average investment return.

After-tax Return

Years to Retirement
5 10 15 20 25 30 35

40

2%

17.6% 7.8% 4.6% 3.0% 2.1% 1.6% 1.2% 0.9%

3%

17.3% 7.4% 4.3% 2.8% 1.9% 1.4% 1.0% 0.8%

4%

16.9% 7.1% 4.0% 2.5% 1.7% 1.2% 0.9% 0.6%

5%

16.6% 6.8% 3.7% 2.3% 1.5% 1.0% 0.7%

0.5%

6% 16.3% 6.5% 3.5% 2.1% 1.3% 0.9% 0.6%

0.4%

7% 16.0% 6.2% 3.2% 1.9% 1.2% 0.7% 0.5%

0.3%

8% 15.7% 6.0% 3.0% 1.7% 1.0% 0.6% 0.4%

0.3%

As you can see, the more risk you take, the less you need to save on average.  That is, as you go down each column in the table or towards the back of the graph, the percentage of your target you need to save in the first year gets smaller.  Also, the longer you have until you retire (as you move right in the table and graph), the smaller the savings percentage.  I caution those of you who have only a few years until retirement, though, that you will want to think carefully about your risk tolerance and may want to use the values in the upper rows of the table corresponding to lower risk/lower return investments, as there is a fairly high chance that your savings will be less than your target due to market volatility if you purchase risky assets.

How to Use the Table

First find the percentage in the cell with a row that corresponds to your after-tax investment return and a column that corresponds to your time to retirement.  You multiply this percentage by your total retirement savings target.  The result of that calculation is how much you need to save in your first year of saving.  To find out how much to save in the second year, multiply by 1.03.  Keep multiplying by 1.03 to find out how much to save in each subsequent year.

Earlier in this post, I created an example with a 5.2% after-tax investment return.  5.2% is fairly close to 5%, so we will look at the row in the table corresponding to 5% to continue this example.  I have calculated your first- and second-year savings amounts for several combinations of years to retirement and total retirement savings targets for someone with a 5% after-tax investment return below.

Years to Retirement

Savings % from Table (5% Row) Total Retirement Savings Target First-Year Savings Amount Second-Year Savings Amount

5

16.6% $500,000 $83,000 $85,490

15

3.7% 2,000,000 74,000

76,220

30 1.0% 500,000 5,000

5,150

40 0.5% 1,000,000 5,000

5,150

The first-year savings amounts in this table highlight the benefits of starting to save for retirement “early and often.”   It is a lot easier to save $5,000 a year than $75,000 or $85,000 a year.  By comparing the last two rows, you can see the benefits of the extra 10 years between 30 years of savings and 40 years of savings.  With the same starting contributions, on average, you end up with twice as much if you save consistently for 40 years than if you do so for 30 years.

Adjusting for Savings You Already Have

The calculations above don’t take into account that you might already have started saving for retirement.  If you already have some retirement savings, you can reduce the amount your need to save each year.

The math is a bit complicated if you don’t like exponents, but I’ll provide a table that will make it a bit easier.  To adjust the annual savings calculation for the amount you already have saved, you need to subtract the future value of your existing savings from your total retirement savings target.  The future value is the amount to which your existing savings will grow by your retirement date.  The formula for future savings is:

where n is the number of years until you retire.  The annual return is the same return you’ve been using in the formulas above.  If you don’t want to deal with the exponent, the table below will help you figure out the factor by which to multiply your current amount saved.

After-tax Return

Years to Retirement
5 10 15 20 25 30 35

40

2%

1.10 1.22 1.35 1.49 1.64 1.81 2.00 2.21

3%

1.16 1.34 1.56 1.81 2.09 2.43 2.81 3.26

4%

1.22 1.48 1.80 2.19 2.67 3.24 3.95 4.80
5% 1.28 1.63 2.08 2.65 3.39 4.32 5.52

7.04

6% 1.34 1.79 2.40 3.21 4.29 5.74 7.69

10.29

7% 1.40 1.97 2.76 3.87 5.43 7.61 10.68

14.97

8% 1.47 2.16 3.17 4.66 6.85 10.06 14.79

21.72

Illustration of Adjustment for Existing Savings

Let’s say you have $50,000 in retirement savings, 25 years until you retire and have selected an annual return of 5%.  You would use the factor from the 5% row in the 25 years column of 3.39.  You multiply $50,000 by 3.39 to get $169,500.

If your total retirement savings target is $1,000,000, you subtract $169,500 and use an adjusted target of $830,500.  Using the same time to retirement and annual return, your annual savings target is 1.5% of $830,500 or $12,458.  This annual savings amount compares to $15,000 if you haven’t saved any money for retirement yet.

Caution

Having been subject to Actuarial Standards of Practice for most of my career (which started before the standards existed), I can’t finish this post without providing a caution.  All of the amounts that I’ve estimated in this post assume that you earn the average return in every year.  There aren’t any financial instruments that can guarantee that you’ll earn the same return year in and year out.  As mentioned above, riskier assets have more volatility in their returns.  That means that, while the average return is higher, the actual returns in any one year are likely to be further from the average than for less risky assets.

As such, you should be aware that the amounts shown for annual savings will NOT assure you that you will have your target amount in savings when you retire.  I suggest that, if possible, you set a higher target for your total retirement savings than you think you’ll really need or save more each year than the amounts resulting from these calculations.

 

Tax-Efficient Investing Strategies – Canada

Tax-Effective-Investing-Canada

You can increase your savings through tax-efficient investing. Tax-efficient investing is the process of maximizing your after-tax investment returns by buying your invested assets in the “best” account from a tax perspective. You may have savings in a taxable account and/or in one or more types of tax-sheltered retirement accounts. Your investment returns are taxed differently depending on the type of account in which you hold your invested assets. In this post, I’ll provide a quick overview of the taxes applicable to each type of account (since I cover taxes on retirement plans in much greater detail in this post) and provide guidelines for how to invest tax-efficiently.

The strategy for tax-efficient investing differs from one country to the next due to differences in tax laws so I’ll talk about tax-efficient investing strategies in the Canada in this post. For information about tax-efficient investing in the US, check out this post.

Types of Investment Returns

I will look at four different types of investments:

  • Individual stocks with high dividends
  • Mutual funds
  • Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) with no dividends
  • Bonds

I will not look at individual stocks with little or no dividends. The returns on those stocks are essentially the same as the returns on ETFs and are taxed in the same manner.

The table below shows the different types of returns on each of these investments.

Type of Distribution: Interest Dividends Capital Gains Capital Gain Distributions
High dividend stocks x x
Mutual Funds x x x
ETFs x
Bonds x x

 

Cash Distributions

Interest and dividends are cash payments that the issuers of financial instruments (i.e., stocks, mutual funds or bonds) make to owners.

Capital Gains

Capital gains come from changes in the value of your investment. You pay taxes on capital gains only when you sell the financial instrument which then makes them realized capital gains. The taxable amount of the realized capital gain is the difference between the amount you receive when you sell the financial instrument and the amount you paid for it when you bought it. Unrealized capital gains are changes in the value of any investment you haven’t yet sold. If the value of an investment is less than what you paid for it, you are said to have a capital loss which can be thought of as a negative capital gain.

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are a bit different from stocks and ETFs. They can have the following types of taxable returns.

  • Dividends – A mutual fund dividend is a distribution of some or all of the dividends that the mutual fund manager has received from the issuers of the securities owned by the mutual fund.
  • Capital gain distributions – Capital gain distributions are money the mutual fund manager pays to owners when a mutual fund sells some of its assets.
  • Capital gains – As with other financial instruments, you pay tax on the difference between the amount you receive when you sell a mutual fund and the amount you paid for it.

Tax Rates

The four types of distributions are taxed differently depending on the type of account in which they are held – Taxable, Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA).

Accounts other than Retirement Accounts

I’ll refer to accounts that aren’t retirement accounts as taxable accounts.   You pay taxes every year on dividends and realized capital gains in a taxable account, whereas you pay them either when you contribute to or withdraw from a retirement account. The table below shows how the different types of investment returns are taxed when they are earned in a taxable account.

Type of Investment Return Tax Rates
Interest & Dividends Same as wages
Realized capital gains & capital gain distributions 50% of capital gains and capital gain distributions are added to wages

The marginal Federal tax rate on wages, and therefore on interest and dividends, for many employed Canadian residents is likely to be 20.5% or 26%.

In a taxable account, you pay taxes on investment returns when you receive them. In the case of capital gains, you are considered to have received them when you sell the financial instrument.

TFSA Retirement Accounts

Before you put money into a TFSA, you pay taxes on it. Once it has been put into the TFSA, you pay no more income taxes regardless of the type of investment return. As such, the tax rate on all investment returns held in a TFSA is 0%.

RRSP Retirement Accounts

You pay income taxes on the total amount of your withdrawal from an RRSP at your ordinary income tax rate. Between the time you make a contribution and withdraw the money, you don’t pay any income taxes on your investment returns.

After-Tax Returns by Type of Account

To illustrate the differences in taxes on each of these four financial instruments, I’ll look at how much you would have if you have $1,000 to invest in each type of account at the end of one year and the end of 10 years.

Here are the assumptions I made regarding pre-tax investment returns.

Annual Pre-tax Investment Return % Interest Dividends Capital Gains
Stocks 0% 3% 5%
ETFs 0% 0% 8%
Mutual Funds 0% 3% 5%
Bonds 4% 0% 0%

Mutual funds usually distribute some or all of realized capital gains to owners. That is, if you own a mutual fund, you are likely to get receive cash from the mutual fund manager related to realized capital gains. Whenever those distributions are made, you have to pay tax on them. For this illustration, I’ve assumed that the mutual fund manager distributes all capital gains to owners, so they are taxed every year.

Here are the tax rates I used for this illustration.

Type of Income Tax Rate
Wages 26%
Interest & Dividends 26%
Capital Gains 13%

One-Year Investment Period

Let’s say you have $1,000 in each account. If you put it in a taxable account, I assume you pay taxes at the end of the year on the investment returns. If you put the money in an RRSP, I assume that you withdraw all of your money and pay taxes at the end of the year on the entire amount at your ordinary income tax rate. (I’ve assumed you are old enough that you don’t have to pay a penalty on withdrawals without penalty from the retirement accounts.)

The table below shows your after-tax investment returns after one year from your initial $1,000. Note that the pre-tax returns are the same as the returns in the TFSA row, as you don’t pay income taxes on returns you earn in your TFSA.

One-Year After-tax Investment Returns ($) Stocks Mutual Funds ETFs Bonds
Taxable $66 $66 $70 $30
RRSP 59 59 59 30
TFSA 80 80 80 40

This table below shows the taxes you paid on your returns during that year.

Taxes Paid Stocks Mutual Funds ETFs Bonds
Taxable $14 $14 $10 $10
RRSP 21 21 21 10
TFSA 0 0 0 0

When looking at these charts, remember that you paid income taxes on the money you contributed to your Taxable account and TFSA before you put it in the account.  Those taxes are not considered in these comparisons. This post focuses on only the taxes you pay on your investment returns.

Comparison Different Financial Instruments Within Each Type of Account

Looking at across the rows, you can see that, for each type of account, stocks and mutual funds have the same one-year returns and tax payments. In this illustration, both stocks and mutual funds have the same split between dividends and appreciation. Your after-tax return on ETFs is higher than either stocks or mutual funds. All of the ETF return is assumed to be in the form of appreciation (i.e., no dividends), so only the lower capital-gain tax rate applies to your returns.

In all accounts, bonds have a lower after-tax return than any of the other three investments. Recall, though, that bonds generally provide a lower return on investment than stocks because they are less risky.

Comparison of Each Financial Instrument in Different Types of Accounts

Looking down the columns, you can see the impact of the differences in tax rates by type of account for each financial instrument. You have more savings at the end of the year if you purchase a financial instrument in a TFSA than if you purchase it in either of the other two accounts for each type of investment.

The returns on investments in a taxable account are higher than on stocks, mutual funds and ETFs held in an RRSP.  You pay taxes on the returns in a taxable account at their respective tax rates, i.e., at 50% of your usual rate on the capital gain portion of your investment return.  However, you pay taxes on RRSP withdrawals at your full ordinary income tax rate.  Because the ordinary income tax rate is higher than the capital gain tax rate, you have a higher after-tax return if you invest in a taxable account than an RRSP for one year.  For bonds, the taxes and after-tax returns are the same in an RRSP and a taxable account because you pay taxes on returns in taxable accounts and distributions from RRSPs at your marginal ordinary income tax rate.

Remember, though, that you had to pay income taxes on the money you put into your account before you made the contribution, whereas you didn’t pay income taxes on the money before you put it into your RRSP.

Ten-Year Investment Period

I’ve used the same assumptions in the 10-year table below, with the exception that I’ve assumed that you will pay ordinary income taxes at a lower rate in 10 years because you will have retired by then. I’ve assumed that your marginal tax rate on ordinary income in retirement will be 20.5%.

Ten-Year After-Tax Investment Returns ($) Stocks Mutual Funds ETFs Bonds
Taxable $917 $890 $1,008 $339
RRSP 921 921 921 382
TFSA 1,159 1,159 1,159 480

Comparison Different Financial Instruments Within Each Type of Account

If you look across the rows, you see that you end up with the same amount of savings by owning stocks, mutual funds and ETFs if you put them in either of the retirement account options. The mix between capital gains, capital gain distributions and dividends doesn’t impact taxes paid in a tax-sheltered account, whereas it makes a big difference in taxable accounts, as can be seen by looking in the Taxable row.

In taxable accounts, ETFs provide the highest after-tax return because they don’t have any taxable transactions until you sell them.  As discussed above, I have assumed that the stocks pay dividends every year.  You have to pay taxes on the dividends before you can reinvest them, thereby reducing your overall savings as compared to an ETF.  You have to pay taxes on both dividends and capital gain distributions from mutual funds before you can reinvest those proceeds, so they provide the least amount of savings of the three stock-like financial instruments in a taxable account.

Comparison of Each Financial Instrument in Different Types of Accounts

Looking down the columns, we can compare your ending savings after 10 years from each financial instrument by type of account. You earn the highest after-tax return for every financial instrument if it is held in a TFSA, as you don’t pay any taxes.

For bonds, you earn a higher after-tax return in an RRSP than in a taxable account. The tax rate on interest is about the same as the tax rate on RRSP withdrawals. When you hold a bond in a taxable account, you have to pay income taxes every year on the coupons you earn before you can reinvest them. In an RRSP, you don’t pay tax until you withdraw the money, so you get the benefit of interest compounding (discussed in this post) before taxes.  In addition, I have assumed that your ordinary income tax rate is lower in retirement, i.e., when you make your RRSP withdrawals.

Your after-tax return is slightly lower in a taxable account than in an RRSP for the three stock-like investments. The ability to compound your returns on a pre-tax basis more than offsets the higher tax rate you pay in the RRSP.

Illustration of Tax Deferral Benefit

The ability to compound your investment returns on a tax-deferred basis is an important one, so I’ll provide an illustration. To keep the illustration simple, let’s assume you have an asset that has a taxable return of 8% every year and that your tax rate is constant at 26% (regardless of the type of account).

The table below shows what happens over a three-year period.

Returns and Taxes by Year Taxable Account RRSP
Initial Investment $1,000 $1,000
Return – Year 1 80 80
Tax – Year 1 21 0
Balance – Year 1 1,059 1,080
Return – Year 2 85 86
Tax – Year 2 22 0
Balance – Year 2 1,122 1,166
Return – Year 3 90 94
Tax – Year 3 23 0
Balance – Year 3 1,188 1,260

By paying taxes in each year, you reduce the amount you have available to invest in subsequent years so you have less return.

The total return earned in the taxable account over three years is $255; in the tax-deferred account, $260. The total of the taxes for the taxable account is $66. Multiplying the $260 of return in the tax-deferred account by the 26% tax rate gives us $68 of taxes from that account. As such, the after-tax returns after three years are $188 in the taxable account and $192 in the tax-deferred account.

These differences might not seem very large, but they continue to compound the longer you hold your investments. For example, after 10 years, your after-tax returns on the tax-deferred account, using the above assumptions, would be almost 10% higher than on the taxable account.

Portfolios Using Tax-Efficient Investing

It is great to know that you get to keep the highest amount of your investment returns if you hold your financial instruments in a TFSA. However, there are limits on how much you can put in TFSAs each year. Also, some employers offer only an RRSP option. As a result, you may have savings that are currently invested in more than one of TFSA, RRSP or taxable account. You therefore will need to buy financial instruments in all three accounts, not just in a TFSA.

Here are some guidelines that will help you figure out which financial instruments to buy in each account:

  • If there is a wide difference in total return, you’ll want to put your highest returning investments in your TFSA.
  • For smaller differences in total return (e.g., less than 2 – 3 percentage points), it is better to put instruments with more distributions in your RRSP and then your TFSA, putting as few of them as possible in your taxable account.
  • Instruments with slightly higher yields, but little to no distributions can be put in your taxable account.
  • You’ll want to hold your lower return, higher distribution financial instruments, such as bonds, in your RRSP. There is a benefit to holding bonds in an RRSP as compared to a taxable account. The same tax rates apply to both accounts, but you don’t have to pay taxes until you withdraw the money from your RRSP, whereas you pay them annually in your taxable account.

Applying Tax-Efficient Investing to Two Portfolios

Let’s see how to apply these guidelines in practice using a couple of examples. To make the examples a bit more interesting, I’ve increased the annual appreciation on the ETF to 10% from 8%, assuming it is a higher risk/higher return type of ETF than the one discussed above. All of the other returns and tax assumptions are the same as in the table earlier in this post.

Portfolio Example 1

In the first example, you have $10,000 in each of a taxable account, an RRSP and a TFSA. You’ve decided that you want to invest equally in stocks, mutual funds and ETFs.

You will put your investment with the lowest taxable distributions each year – the ETF – in your taxable account. The stocks and mutual fund have higher taxable distributions each year, so it is better to put them in your tax-sheltered accounts. Because they have similar total returns in this example, it doesn’t matter how you allocate your stocks and mutual funds between your TFSA and RRSP.

Portfolio Example 2

In the second example, you again have $10,000 in each of a taxable account, an RRSP and a TFSA. In this example, you want to invest $15,000 in the high-yielding ETFs but offset the risk of that increased investment by buying $5,000 in bonds. You’ll split the remaining $10,000 evenly between stocks and mutual funds.

You again buy as much of your ETFs as you can in your taxable account. The remainder is best put in your TFSA, as the ETFs have the highest total return so you don’t want to pay any tax on the money when you withdraw it. The bonds have the lowest return, so it is best to put them in your RRSP as you will pay less tax on the lower bond returns than the higher stock or mutual fund returns. As in Example 1, it doesn’t matter how you allocate your stocks and mutual funds between your TFSA and RRSP.

Risks of Tax-Efficient Investing

There is a very important factor I’ve ignored in all of the above discussion – RISK (a topic I cover in great detail in this post). The investment returns I used above are all risky. That is, you won’t earn 3% dividends and 5% appreciation every year on the stocks or mutual funds or 10% on the ETFs. Those may be the long-term averages for the particular financial instruments I’ve used in the illustration, but you will earn a different percentage every year.

If your time horizon is short, say less than five to ten years, you’ll want to consider the chance that one or more of your financial instruments will lose value over that time frame. If you had perfect foresight, you would put your money-losing investments in your RRSP because you would reduce the portion of your taxable income taxed at the higher ordinary income tax by the amount of the loss when you withdraw the money. Just as the government gets a share of your profits, it also shares in your losses.

The caution is that financial instruments with higher returns also tend to be riskier. If you put your highest return investments – the ETFs in my example – in your TFSA, their value might decrease over a short time horizon. If they decrease, your after-tax loss is the full amount of the loss. If, instead, you had put that financial instrument in your RRSP, the government would share 26% of the loss in my example.

In conclusion, if you plan to allocate your investments using the above guidelines, be sure to adjust them if your time horizon is shorter than about 10 years to minimize the chance that you will have to keep all of a loss on any one financial instrument.